• We present the detection of very extended stellar populations around the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) out to R~21 degrees, or ~18.5 kpc at the LMC distance of 50 kpc, as detected in the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) performed with the Dark Energy Camera on the NOAO Blanco 4m Telescope. The deep (g~24) SMASH color magnitude diagrams (CMDs) clearly reveal old (~9 Gyr), metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-0.8 dex) main-sequence stars at a distance of 50 kpc. The surface brightness of these detections is extremely low with our most distant detection having 34 mag per arcsec squared in g-band. The SMASH radial density profile breaks from the inner LMC exponential decline at ~13-15 degrees and a second component at larger radii has a shallower slope with power-law index of -2.2 that contributes ~0.4% of the LMC's total stellar mass. In addition, the SMASH densities exhibit large scatter around our best-fit model of ~70% indicating that the envelope of stellar material in the LMC periphery is highly disturbed. We also use data from the NOAO Source catalog to map the LMC main-sequence populations at intermediate radii and detect a steep dropoff in density on the eastern side of the LMC (at R~8 deg) as well as an extended structure to the far northeast. These combined results confirm the existence of a very extended, low-density envelope of stellar material with disturbed shape around the LMC. The exact origin of this structure remains unclear but the leading options include a classical accreted halo or tidally stripped outer disk material.
  • We explore the stellar structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) disk using data from the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We detect a ring-like stellar overdensity in the red clump star count map at a radius of ~6 degrees (~5.2kpc at the LMC distance) that is continuous over ~270 degrees in position angle and is only limited by the current data coverage. The overdensity is clearly continuous in the southern disk, as covered by the SMASH survey, with an amplitude up to 2.5 times higher than that of the underlying smooth disk. This structure might be related to the multiple arms found by de Vaucouleurs (1955). We find that the overdensity shows spatial correlation with intermediate-age star clusters, but not with young (< 1Gyr) main sequence stars, indicating the stellar populations associated with the overdensity are intermediate in age or older. This suggests that either (1) the overdensity formed out of an asymmetric one-armed spiral wrapping around the LMC main body, which is induced by repeated encounters with the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) over the last Gyr, or (2) the overdensity formed very recently as a tidal response to a direct collision with the SMC. Both scenarios suggest that the ring-like overdensity is likely a product of tidal interaction with the SMC, but not with the Milky Way halo.
  • We present a study of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using ~2.2 million red clump (RC) stars selected from the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH). To correct for line-of-sight dust extinction, the intrinsic RC color and magnitude and their radial dependence are carefully measured by using internal nearly dust-free regions. These are then used to construct an accurate 2D reddening map (165 square degrees with ~10 arcmin resolution) of the LMC disk and the 3D spatial distribution of RC stars. An inclined disk model is fit to the 2D distance map yielding a best-fit inclination angle i = 25.86(+0.73,-1.39) degrees with random errors of +\-0.19 degrees, line-of-nodes position angle theta = 149.23(+6.43,-8.35) degrees with random errors of +/-0.49 degrees. These angles vary with galactic radius, indicating that the LMC disk is warped and twisted likely due to the repeated tidal interactions with the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). For the first time, our data reveal a significant warp in the southwest of the outer disk starting at rho ~ 7 degrees that departs from the defined LMC plane up to ~4 kpc towards the SMC, suggesting that it originated from a strong interaction with the SMC. In addition, the inner disk encompassing the off-centered bar appears to be tilted up to 5-15 degrees relative to the rest of the LMC disk. These findings on the outer warp and the tilted bar are consistent with the predictions from the Besla et al. (2012) simulation of a recent direct collision with the SMC.