• We perform an extensive survey of non-standard Higgs decays that are consistent with the 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance. Our aim is to motivate a large set of new experimental analyses on the existing and forthcoming data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The explicit search for exotic Higgs decays presents a largely untapped discovery opportunity for the LHC collaborations, as such decays may be easily missed by other searches. We emphasize that the Higgs is uniquely sensitive to the potential existence of new weakly coupled particles and provide a unified discussion of a large class of both simplified and complete models that give rise to characteristic patterns of exotic Higgs decays. We assess the status of exotic Higgs decays after LHC Run 1. In many cases we are able to set new nontrivial constraints by reinterpreting existing experimental analyses. We point out that improvements are possible with dedicated analyses and perform some preliminary collider studies. We prioritize the analyses according to their theoretical motivation and their experimental feasibility. This document is accompanied by a website that will be continuously updated with further information: http://exotichiggs.physics.sunysb.edu.
  • A future proton-proton collider with center of mass energy around 100 TeV will have a remarkable capacity to discover massive new particles and continue exploring weak scale naturalness. In this work we will study its sensitivity to two stop simplified models as further examples of its potential power: pair production of stops that decay to tops or bottoms and higgsinos; and stops that are either pair produced or produced together with a gluino and then cascade down through gluinos to the lightest superpartner (LSP). In both simplified models, super-boosted tops or bottoms with transverse momentum of order TeV will be produced abundantly and call for new strategies to identify them. We will apply a set of simple jet observables, including track-based jet mass, N-subjettiness and mass drop, to tag the boosted hadronic or leptonic decaying objects and suppress the Standard Model as well as possible SUSY backgrounds. Assuming 10% systematic uncertainties, the future 100 TeV collider can discover (exclude) stops with masses up to 6 (7) TeV with 3 inverse attobarns of integrated luminosity if the stops decay to higgsinos. If the stops decay through gluinos to LSPs, due to additional SUSY backgrounds from gluino pair production, a higher luminosity of about 30 inverse attobarns is needed to discover stops up to 6 TeV. We will also discuss how to use jet observables to distinguish simplified models with different types of LSPs. The boosted top or bottom tagging strategies developed in this paper could also be used in other searches at a 100 TeV collider. For example, the strategy could help discover gluino pair production with gluino mass close to 11 TeV with 3 inverse attobarns of integrated luminosity.
  • In this paper we demonstrate the agreement of jet-veto resummation and pT resummation for explaining the WW cross sections at Run 1 of the LHC, and in the future. These two resummation techniques resum different logarithms, however via reweighting methods they can be compared for various differential or exclusive cross sections. We find excellent agreement between the two resummation methods for predicting the zero-jet cross section, and propose a new reweighting method for jet-veto resummation that can be used to compare other differential distributions. We advocate a cross-channel comparison for the high-luminosity run of the LHC as both a test of QCD and new physics.
  • The artificial separation of a full-theory mode into distinct collinear and soft modes in SCET leads to divergent integrals over rapidity, which are not present in the full theory. Rapidity divergence introduces an additional scale into the problem, giving rise to its own renormalization group with respect to this new scale. Two contradicting claims exist in the literature concerning rapidity scale uncertainty. One camp has shown that the results of perturbative calculations depend on the precise choice of rapidity scale. The other has derived an all-order factorization formula with no dependence on rapidity scale, by using a form of analytic regulator to regulate rapidity divergences. We deliver a simple resolution to this controversy by deriving an alternative form of the all-order factorization formula with an analytic regulator that, despite being formally rapidity scale independent, reveals how rapidity scale dependence arises when it is truncated at a finite order in perturbation theory. With our results, one can continue to take advantage of the technical ease and simplicity of the analytic regulator approach while correctly taking into account rapidity scale dependence. As an application, we update our earlier study of WW production with jet-veto by including rapidity scale uncertainty. While the central values of the predictions are unchanged, the scale uncertainties are increased and consistency between the NLL and NNLL calculations are improved.
  • The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in the $h\tau\tau$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $\Theta$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $h\tau\tau$ coupling through the $\tau^\pm \to \pi^\pm \pi^0 \nu$ decay mode. We examine two crucial questions that the real LHC detectors must face, namely, the issue of neutrino reconstruction and the effects of finite detector resolution. For the former, we find strong evidence that the collinear approximation is the best for the $\Theta$ variable. For the latter, we find that the angular resolution is actually not an issue even though the reconstruction of $\Theta$ requires resolving the highly collimated $\pi^\pm$'s and $\pi^0$'s from the $\tau$ decays. Instead, we find that it is the missing transverse energy resolution that significantly limits the LHC reach for measuring the CP phase via $\Theta$. With the current missing energy resolution, we find that with $\sim 1000\,\textrm{fb}^{-1}$ the CP phase hypotheses $\Delta = 0^\circ$ (the standard model value) and $\Delta = 90^\circ$ can be distinguished, at most, at the 95\% confidence level.
  • The WW production cross section measured at the LHC has been consistently exhibiting a mild excess beyond the SM prediction, in both ATLAS and CMS at both 7-TeV and 8-TeV runs. We provide an explanation of the excess in terms of resummation of large logarithms that arise from a jet-veto condition, i.e., the rejection of high-pT jets with pT > pT(veto) that is imposed in the experimental analyses to reduce backgrounds. Jet veto introduces a second mass scale pT(veto) to the problem in addition to the invariant mass of the WW pair. This gives rise to large logarithms of the ratio of the two scales that need to be resummed. Such resummation may not be properly accounted for by the Monte Carlo simulations used in the ATLAS and CMS studies. Those logarithms are also accompanied by large pi^2 terms when the standard, positive sign is chosen for the squared renormalization scale. We analytically resum the large logarithms including the pi^2 terms in the framework of soft collinear effective theory (SCET), and demonstrate that the SCET calculation not only reduces the scale uncertainties of the SM prediction significantly but also renders the theory prediction well compatible with the experiment. We find that resummation of the large logarithms and that of the pi^2 terms are both comparably important.
  • The electroweak diboson production cross-sections are known to receive large radiative corrections beyond leading-order (LO), approaching up to 60% at next-to-leading order (NLO), compared to the scale uncertainties which are in the range 1-5% at LO. If the scale uncertainties are to be taken seriously, the NLO predictions are as much as 30 sigma away from their LO counterpart suggesting a very poor convergence of the perturbation theory. In this paper, we show that there is a second source of scale uncertainty which has not been considered in the literature, namely the complex phase of the scales, which can lead to large perturbative corrections. Using the formalism of soft-collinear effective theory, we resum these large contributions from the complex phase, finding that the scale uncertainties in fixed-order calculations can be grossly underestimated compared to the resummed predictions, which have uncertainties as large as 13-16% at LO. Even at NLO, we find that the scale uncertainties are marginally higher than previously estimated, depending on the choice of scale. Using our method of scale variation, the compatibility of LO and NLO results within the scale uncertainties is vastly improved so that the perturbation theory can be relied upon. This method of scale variation can be easily extended to beyond NLO calculations as well as other LHC processes.
  • The Standard Model (SM) has had resounding success in describing almost every measurement performed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. In particular, these experiments have put many beyond the SM models of natural Electroweak Symmetry Breaking into tension with the data. It is therefore remarkable that it is still the LEP experiment, and not the LHC, which often sets the gold standard for understanding the possibility of new color-neutral states at the electroweak (EW) scale. Recently, ATLAS and CMS have started to push beyond LEP in bounding heavy new EW states, but a gap between the exclusions of LEP and the LHC typically remains. In this paper we show that measurements of SM Standard Candles can be repurposed to set entirely complementary constraints on new physics. To demonstrate this, we use WW cross section measurements to set bounds on a set of slepton-based simplified models which fill in the gaps left by LEP and dedicated LHC searches. Having demonstrated the sensitivity of the WW measurement to light sleptons, we also find regions where sleptons can improve the fit of the data compared to the NLO SM WW prediction alone. Remarkably, in those regions the sleptons also provide for the right relic-density of Bino-like Dark Matter and provide an explanation for the longstanding 3 sigma discrepancy in the measurement of (g-2)_\mu.
  • We investigate the spectacular collider signatures of macroscopically displaced, neutral particles that decay to Higgs bosons and missing energy. We show that such long-lived particles arise naturally in a very minimal extension of the Standard Model with only two new fermions with electroweak interactions. The lifetime of the long-lived neutral particles can range from 10^{-2} mm to 10^6 mm. In some regions of the parameter space, the exotic signals would have already been selected by the ATLAS and CMS triggers in their 7 and 8 TeV runs, hence hiding in the existing data. We also discuss the possibility of explaining the mild anomalies observed in the diphoton Higgs channel and the WW production at the LHC.
  • Recent 7 TeV 5/fb measurements by ATLAS and CMS have measured both overall and differential WW cross sections that differ from NLO SM predictions. While these measurements aren't statistically significant enough to rule out the SM, we demonstrate that the data from both experiments can be better fit with the inclusion of electroweak gauginos with masses of O(100) GeV. We show that these new states are consistent with other experimental searches/measurements and can have ramifications for Higgs phenomenology. Additionally, we show how the first measurements of the WW cross section at 8 TeV by CMS strengthen our conclusions.
  • In the context of the MSSM the Light Stop Scenario (LSS) is the only region of parameter space that allows for successful Electroweak Baryogenesis (EWBG). This possibility is very phenomenologically attractive, since it allows for the direct production of light stops and could be tested at the LHC. The ATLAS and CMS experiments have recently supplied tantalizing hints for a Higgs boson with a mass of ~ 125 GeV. This Higgs mass severely restricts the parameter space of the LSS, and we discuss the specific predictions made for EWBG in the MSSM. Combining data from all the available ATLAS and CMS Higgs searches reveals a tension with the predictions of EWBG even at this early stage. This allows us to exclude EWBG in the MSSM at greater than (90) 95% confidence level in the (non-)decoupling limit, by examining correlations between different Higgs decay channels. We also examine the exclusion without the assumption of a ~ 125 GeV Higgs. The Higgs searches are still highly constraining, excluding the entire EWBG parameter space at greater than 90% CL except for a small window of m_h ~ 117 - 119 GeV.
  • Atomic Compton profiles (CPs) are a very important property which provide us information about the momentum distribution of atomic electrons. Therefore, for CPs of heavy atoms, relativistic effects are expected to be important, warranting a relativistic treatment of the problem. In this paper, we present an efficient approach aimed at ab initio calculations of atomic CPs within a Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) formalism, employing kinetically-balanced Gaussian basis functions. The approach is used to compute the CPs of noble gases ranging from He to Rn, and the results have been compared to the experimental and other theoretical data, wherever possible. The influence of the quality of the basis set on the calculated CPs has also been systematically investigated.