• Using the tight-binding approach, we investigate the energy spectrum of square, triangular and hexagonal MoS$_2$ quantum dots (QDs) in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Novel edge states emerge in MoS$_2$ QDs, which are distributed over the whole edge which we call ring states. The ring states are robust in the presence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The corresponding energy levels of the ring states oscillate as function of the perpendicular magnetic field which are related to Aharonov-Bohm oscillations. Oscillations in the magnetic field dependence of the energy levels and the peaks in the magneto-optical spectrum emerge (disappear) as the ring states are formed (collapsed). The period and the amplitude of the oscillation decreases with the size of the MoS$_2$ QDs.
  • Efficient polarization of organic molecules is of extraordinary relevance when performing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging. Commercially available routes to dynamical nuclear polarization (DNP) work at extremely low-temperatures, thus bringing the molecules out of their ambient thermal conditions and relying on the solidification of organic samples. In this work we investigate polarization transfer from optically-pumped nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to external molecules at room temperature. This polarization transfer is described by both an extensive analytical analysis and numerical simulations based on spin bath bosonization and is supported by experimental data in excellent agreement. These results set the route to hyperpolarization of diffusive molecules in different scenarios and consequently, due to increased signal, to high-resolution NMR.
  • We systematically investigate the magnetic properties and local structure of Ba2YIrO6 to demonstrate that Y and Ir lattice defects in the form of antiphase boundary or clusters of antisite disorder affect the magnetism observed in this $d^4$ compound. We compare the magnetic properties and atomic imaging of (1) a slow cooled crystal, (2) a crystal quenched from 900\degree C after growth, and (3) a crystal grown using a faster cooling rate than the slow cooled one. Atomic imaging by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) shows that quenching from 900oC introduces antiphase boundary to the crystals, and a faster cooling rate during crystal growth leads to clusters of Y and Ir antisite disorder. STEM study suggests the antiphase boundary region is Ir-rich with a composition of Ba2YIrO6. The magnetic measurements show that Ba2YIrO6 crystals with clusters of antisite defects have a larger effective moment and a larger saturation moment than the slow-cooled crystals. Quenched crystals with Ir-rich antiphase boundary shows a slightly suppressed saturation moment than the slow cooled crystals, and this seems to suggest that antiphase boundary is detrimental to the moment formation. Our DFT calculations suggest magnetic condensation is unlikely as the energy to be gained from superexchange is small compared to the spin-orbit gap. However, once Y is replaced by Ir in the antisite disordered region, the picture of local non-magnetic singlets breaks down and magnetism can be induced. This is because of (a) enhanced interactions due to increased overlap of orbitals between sites, and, (b) increased number of orbitals mediating the interactions. Our work highlights the importance of lattice defects in understanding the experimentally observed magnetism in Ba2YIrO6 and other J=0 systems.
  • Coexistence of different geometric shapes at low energies presents a universal structure phenomenon that occurs over the entire chart of nuclides. Studies of the shape coexistence are important for understanding the microscopic origin of collectivity and modifications of shell structure in exotic nuclei far from stability. The aim of this work is to provide a systematic analysis of characteristic signatures of coexisting nuclear shapes in different mass regions, using a global self-consistent theoretical method based on universal energy density functionals and the quadrupole collective model. The low-energy excitation spectrum and quadrupole shape invariants of the two lowest $0^{+}$ states of even-even nuclei are obtained as solutions of a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian (5DCH) model, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent mean-field calculations based on the relativistic energy density functional PC-PK1, and a finite-range pairing interaction. The theoretical excitation energies of the states: $2^+_1$, $4^+_1$, $0^+_2$, $2^+_2$, $2^+_3$, as well as the $B(E2; 0^+_1\to 2^+_1)$ values, are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental values for 621 even-even nuclei. Quadrupole shape invariants have been implemented to investigate shape coexistence, and the distribution of possible shape-coexisting nuclei is consistent with results obtained in recent theoretical studies and available data. The present analysis has shown that, when based on a universal and consistent microscopic framework of nuclear density functionals, shape invariants provide distinct indicators and reliable predictions for the occurrence of low-energy coexisting shapes. This method is particularly useful for studies of shape coexistence in regions far from stability where few data are available.
  • We have performed magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, muon spin relaxation, and neutron scattering measurements on three members of the family Ba3MRu2O9, where M = In, Y and Lu. These systems consist of mixed-valence Ru dimers on a triangular lattice with antiferromagnetic interdimer exchange. Although previous work has argued that charge order within the dimers or intradimer double exchange plays an important role in determining the magnetic properties, our results suggest that the dimers are better described as molecular units due to significant orbital hybridization, resulting in one spin-1/2 moment distributed equally over the two Ru sites. These molecular building blocks form a frustrated, quasi-two-dimensional triangular lattice. Our zero and longitudinal field muSR results indicate that the molecular moments develop a collective, static magnetic ground state, with oscillations of the zero field muon spin polarization indicative of long-range magnetic order in the Lu sample. The static magnetism is much more disordered in the Y and In samples, but they do not appear to be conventional spin glasses.
  • The coherent high-fidelity generation of nuclear spins in long-lived singlet states which may find application as quantum memory or sensor represents a considerable experimental challenge. Here we propose a dissipative scheme that achieves the preparation of pairs of nuclear spins in long-lived singlet states by a protocol that combines the interaction between the nuclei and a periodically reset electron spin of an NV center with local rf-control of the nuclear spins. The final state of this protocol is independent of the initial preparation of the nuclei, is robust to external field fluctuations and can be operated at room temperature. We show that a high fidelity singlet pair of a 13C dimer in a nuclear bath in diamond can be generated under realistic experimental conditions.
  • We propose to use a dissipatively engineered nitrogen vacancy (NV) center as a mediator of interaction between two nuclear spins that are protected from decoherence and relaxation of the NV. Under ambient conditions this scheme achieves highly selective high-fidelity quantum gates between nuclear spins in a quantum register even at large NV-nuclear distances. Importantly, this method allows for the use of nuclear spins as a sensor rather than a memory, while the NV spin acts as an ancillary system for the initialization and read out of the sensor. The immunity to the decoherence and relaxation of the NV center leads to a tunable sharp frequency filter while allowing at the same time the continuous collection of the signal to achieve simultaneously high spectral selectivity and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).
  • Over the past few decades, tremendous progress has been made in the development of particle-based discrete simulation methods versus the conventional continuum-based methods. In particular, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has evolved from a theoretical novelty to a ubiquitous, versatile and powerful computational methodology for both fundamental research and engineering applications. It is a kinetic-based mesoscopic approach that bridges the microscales and macroscales, which offers distinctive advantages in simulation fidelity and computational efficiency. Applications of the LB method have been found in a wide range of disciplines including physics, chemistry, materials, biomedicine and various branches of engineering. The present work provides a comprehensive review of the LB method for thermofluids and energy applications, focusing on multiphase flows, thermal flows and thermal multiphase flows with phase change. The review first covers the theoretical framework of the LB method, revealing the existing inconsistencies and defects as well as common features of multiphase and thermal LB models. Recent developments in improving the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic consistency, reducing the spurious currents, enhancing the numerical stability, etc., are highlighted. These efforts have put the LB method on a firmer theoretical foundation with enhanced LB models that can achieve larger liquid-gas density ratio, higher Reynolds number and flexible surface tension. Examples of applications are provided in fuel cells and batteries, droplet collision, boiling heat transfer and evaporation, and energy storage. Finally, further developments and future prospect of the LB method are outlined for thermofluids and energy applications.
  • T. Adam, F. An, G. An, Q. An, N. Anfimov, V. Antonelli, G. Baccolo, M. Baldoncini, E. Baussan, M. Bellato, L. Bezrukov, D. Bick, S. Blyth, S. Boarin, A. Brigatti, T. Brugière, R. Brugnera, M. Buizza Avanzini, J. Busto, A. Cabrera, H. Cai, X. Cai, A. Cammi, D. Cao, G. Cao, J. Cao, J. Chang, Y. Chang, M. Chen, P. Chen, Q. Chen, S. Chen, S. Chen, S. Chen, X. Chen, Y. Chen, Y. Cheng, D. Chiesa, A. Chukanov, M. Clemenza, B. Clerbaux, D. D'Angelo, H. de Kerret, Z. Deng, Z. Deng, X. Ding, Y. Ding, Z. Djurcic, S. Dmitrievsky, M. Dolgareva, D. Dornic, E. Doroshkevich, M. Dracos, O. Drapier, S. Dusini, M.A. Díaz, T. Enqvist, D. Fan, C. Fang, J. Fang, X. Fang, L. Favart, D. Fedoseev, G. Fiorentini, R. Ford, A. Formozov, R. Gaigher, H. Gan, A. Garfagnini, G. Gaudiot, C. Genster, M. Giammarchi, F. Giuliani, M. Gonchar, G. Gong, H. Gong, M. Gonin, Y. Gornushkin, M. Grassi, C. Grewing, V. Gromov, M. Gu, M. Guan, V. Guarino, W. Guo, X. Guo, Y. Guo, M. Göger-Neff, P. Hackspacher, C. Hagner, R. Han, Z. Han, J. Hao, M. He, D. Hellgartner, Y. Heng, D. Hong, S. Hou, Y. Hsiung, B. Hu, J. Hu, S. Hu, T. Hu, W. Hu, H. Huang, X. Huang, X. Huang, L. Huo, W. Huo, A. Ioannisian, D. Ioannisyan, M. Jeitler, K. Jen, S. Jetter, X. Ji, X. Ji, S. Jian, D. Jiang, X. Jiang, C. Jollet, M. Kaiser, B. Kan, L. Kang, M. Karagounis, N. Kazarian, S. Kettell, D. Korablev, A. Krasnoperov, S. Krokhaleva, Z. Krumshteyn, A. Kruth, P. Kuusiniemi, T. Lachenmaier, L. Lei, R. Lei, X. Lei, R. Leitner, F. Lenz, C. Li, F. Li, F. Li, J. Li, N. Li, S. Li, T. Li, W. Li, W. Li, X. Li, X. Li, X. Li, X. Li, Y. Li, Y. Li, Z. Li, H. Liang, H. Liang, J. Liang, M. Licciardi, G. Lin, S. Lin, T. Lin, Y. Lin, I. Lippi, G. Liu, H. Liu, H. Liu, J. Liu, J. Liu, J. Liu, J. Liu, Q. Liu, Q. Liu, S. Liu, S. Liu, Y. Liu, P. Lombardi, Y. Long, S. Lorenz, C. Lu, F. Lu, H. Lu, J. Lu, J. Lu, J. Lu, B. Lubsandorzhiev, S. Lubsandorzhiev, L. Ludhova, F. Luo, S. Luo, Z. Lv, V. Lyashuk, Q. Ma, S. Ma, X. Ma, X. Ma, Y. Malyshkin, F. Mantovani, Y. Mao, S. Mari, D. Mayilyan, W. McDonough, G. Meng, A. Meregaglia, E. Meroni, M. Mezzetto, J. Min, L. Miramonti, M. Montuschi, N. Morozov, T. Mueller, P. Muralidharan, M. Nastasi, D. Naumov, E. Naumova, I. Nemchenok, Z. Ning, H. Nunokawa, L. Oberauer, J.P. Ochoa-Ricoux, A. Olshevskiy, F. Ortica, H. Pan, A. Paoloni, N. Parkalian, S. Parmeggiano, V. Pec, N. Pelliccia, H. Peng, P. Poussot, S. Pozzi, E. Previtali, S. Prummer, F. Qi, M. Qi, S. Qian, X. Qian, H. Qiao, Z. Qin, G. Ranucci, A. Re, B. Ren, J. Ren, T. Rezinko, B. Ricci, M. Robens, A. Romani, B. Roskovec, X. Ruan, X. Ruan, A. Rybnikov, A. Sadovsky, P. Saggese, G. Salamanna, J. Sawatzki, J. Schuler, A. Selyunin, G. Shi, J. Shi, Y. Shi, V. Sinev, C. Sirignano, M. Sisti, O. Smirnov, M. Soiron, A. Stahl, L. Stanco, J. Steinmann, V. Strati, G. Sun, X. Sun, Y. Sun, Y. Sun, D. Taichenachev, J. Tang, A. Tietzsch, I. Tkachev, W.H. Trzaska, Y. Tung, S. van Waasen, C. Volpe, V. Vorobel, L. Votano, C. Wang, C. Wang, C. Wang, G. Wang, H. Wang, M. Wang, R. Wang, S. Wang, W. Wang, W. Wang, Y. Wang, Y. Wang, Y. Wang, Y. Wang, Z. Wang, Z. Wang, Z. Wang, Z. Wang, Z. Wang, W. Wei, Y. Wei, M. Weifels, L. Wen, Y. Wen, C. Wiebusch, S. Wipperfurth, S.C. Wong, B. Wonsak, C. Wu, Q. Wu, Z. Wu, M. Wurm, J. Wurtz, Y. Xi, D. Xia, J. Xia, M. Xiao, Y. Xie, J. Xu, J. Xu, L. Xu, Y. Xu, B. Yan, X. Yan, C. Yang, C. Yang, H. Yang, L. Yang, M. Yang, Y. Yang, Y. Yang, Y. Yang, E. Yanovich, Y. Yao, M. Ye, X. Ye, U. Yegin, F. Yermia, Z. You, B. Yu, C. Yu, C. Yu, G. Yu, Z. Yu, Y. Yuan, Z. Yuan, M. Zanetti, P. Zeng, S. Zeng, T. Zeng, L. Zhan, C. Zhang, F. Zhang, G. Zhang, H. Zhang, J. Zhang, J. Zhang, J. Zhang, K. Zhang, P. Zhang, Q. Zhang, T. Zhang, X. Zhang, X. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Z. Zhang, Z. Zhang, J. Zhao, M. Zhao, T. Zhao, Y. Zhao, H. Zheng, M. Zheng, X. Zheng, Y. Zheng, W. Zhong, G. Zhou, J. Zhou, L. Zhou, N. Zhou, R. Zhou, S. Zhou, W. Zhou, X. Zhou, Y. Zhou, H. Zhu, K. Zhu, H. Zhuang, L. Zong, J. Zou
    Sept. 28, 2015 hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is proposed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy using an underground liquid scintillator detector. It is located 53 km away from both Yangjiang and Taishan Nuclear Power Plants in Guangdong, China. The experimental hall, spanning more than 50 meters, is under a granite mountain of over 700 m overburden. Within six years of running, the detection of reactor antineutrinos can resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy at a confidence level of 3-4$\sigma$, and determine neutrino oscillation parameters $\sin^2\theta_{12}$, $\Delta m^2_{21}$, and $|\Delta m^2_{ee}|$ to an accuracy of better than 1%. The JUNO detector can be also used to study terrestrial and extra-terrestrial neutrinos and new physics beyond the Standard Model. The central detector contains 20,000 tons liquid scintillator with an acrylic sphere of 35 m in diameter. $\sim$17,000 508-mm diameter PMTs with high quantum efficiency provide $\sim$75% optical coverage. The current choice of the liquid scintillator is: linear alkyl benzene (LAB) as the solvent, plus PPO as the scintillation fluor and a wavelength-shifter (Bis-MSB). The number of detected photoelectrons per MeV is larger than 1,100 and the energy resolution is expected to be 3% at 1 MeV. The calibration system is designed to deploy multiple sources to cover the entire energy range of reactor antineutrinos, and to achieve a full-volume position coverage inside the detector. The veto system is used for muon detection, muon induced background study and reduction. It consists of a Water Cherenkov detector and a Top Tracker system. The readout system, the detector control system and the offline system insure efficient and stable data acquisition and processing.
  • Here we propose and analyse in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.
  • During its first six years of operation, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected >30 MeV gamma-ray emission from more than 40 solar flares, nearly a factor of 10 more than those detected by EGRET. These include detections of impulsive and sustained emissions, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the 2012 March 7 X-class flares. We will present an overview of solar flare detections with LAT, highlighting recent results and surprising features, including the detection of >100 MeV emission associated with flares located behind the limb. Such flares may shed new light on the relationship between the sites of particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission.
  • In this paper, we aim to investigate the implementation of contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting at a large density ratio. The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model [X. Shan and H. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 2941 (1994)] is a popular mesoscopic model for simulating multiphase flows and interfacial dynamics. In this model, the contact angle is usually realized by a fluid-solid interaction. Two widely used fluid-solid interactions: the density-based interaction and the pseudopotential-based interaction, as well as a modified pseudopotential-based interaction formulated in the present paper, are numerically investigated and compared in terms of the achievable contact angles, the maximum and the minimum densities, and the spurious currents. It is found that the pseudopotential-based interaction works well for simulating small static (liquid) contact angles, however, is unable to reproduce static contact angles close to 180 degrees. Meanwhile, it is found that the proposed modified pseudopotential-based interaction performs better in light of the maximum and the minimum densities and is overall more suitable for simulating large contact angles as compared with the other two types of fluid-solid interactions. Furthermore, the spurious currents are found to be enlarged when the fluid-solid interaction force is introduced. Increasing the kinematic viscosity ratio between the vapor and liquid phases is shown to be capable of reducing the spurious currents caused by the fluid-solid interactions.
  • The bio-inertness of titanium and its alloys attracts their use as bone implants. However a bioactive coating is usually necessary for improving the bone bonding of such implants. In this study, electrophoretic deposition(EPD) of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder on titanium plate was performed using butanol as solvent under direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) fields. The zeta potential of the suspensions was measured to understand their stability and the charge on the particles. Coating thickness was varied by adjusting the voltage and time of deposition. Surface morphology and cross section thickness were studied using scanning electron microscopy and image analysis software. Surface crack density was calculated from the micrographs. The results showed that the samples of similar thickness have higher grain density when coated using AC as compared to DC EPD. This facile but novel test proves the capability of AC-EPD to attain denser and uniform HA coatings from non-aqueous medium.
  • In this paper we present a new multi-scale simulation scheme for next-generation electronic design automation for nano-electronics. The scheme features a combination of the first-principles quantum mechanical calculation, semi-classical semiconductor device simulation, compact model generation and circuit simulation. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme, we apply our newly developed quantum mechanics/electromagnetics method to simulate the junctionless transistors. The simulation results are consistent with the experimental measurements and provide new insights on the depletion effect of the hetero-doped gate on the drain current. Based on the calculated I-V curves, a compact model is then constructed for the junctionless transistors. The validity of the compact model is further verified by the transient circuit simulation of an inverter.
  • We describe the concepts and technical realization of the high-resolution soft-X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) and Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES). The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0-180 deg rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well-established scheme of plane grating monochromator (PGM) operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/dE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed vs lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Due to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, high photon flux is achieved up to 1.0e13 photons/s/0.01%BW at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 um, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/dE better than 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, we give an overview of the control system, describe diagnostics and software tools, and discuss strategies used for the optical alignment. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realization of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given.
  • Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous turbulence under rapid rigid rotation are conducted to examine the predictions of resonant wave theory for both small Rossby number and large Reynolds number. The simulation results reveal that there is a clear inverse energy cascade to the large scales, as predicted by 2D Navier-Stokes equations for resonant interactions of slow modes. As the rotation rate increases, the vertically-averaged horizontal velocity field from 3D Navier-Stokes converges to the velocity field from 2D Navier-Stokes, as measured by the energy in their difference field. Likewise, the vertically-averaged vertical velocity from 3D Navier-Stokes converges to a solution of the 2D passive scalar equation. The energy flux directly into small wave numbers in the $k_z=0$ plane from non-resonant interactions decreases, while fast-mode energy concentrates closer to that plane. The simulations are consistent with an increasingly dominant role of resonant triads for more rapid rotation.
  • We show that Kolmogorov multipliers in turbulence cannot be statistically independent of others at adjacent scales (or even a finite range apart) by numerical simulation of a shell model and by theory. As the simplest generalization of independent distributions, we suppose that the steady-state statistics of multipliers in the shell model are given by a translation-invariant Gibbs measure with a short-range potential, when expressed in terms of suitable ``spin'' variables: real-valued spins that are logarithms of multipliers and XY-spins defined by local dynamical phases. Numerical evidence is presented in favor of the hypothesis for the shell model, in particular novel scaling laws and derivative relations predicted by the existence of a thermodynamic limit. The Gibbs measure appears to be in a high-temperature, unique-phase regime with ``paramagnetic'' spin order.
  • Experimental results are reported for the bulk motion induced in a bed of granular matter contained in a cylindrical pan with a flat bottom subjected to simultaneous vertical and horizontal vibrations. The motion in space of the moving pan is quantified. A number of distinct bulk dynamical modes are observed in which the particle bed adopts different shapes and motions. At the lowest pan excitation frequency $\omega$, the bed forms a ``heap,'' and rotates about the cylinder axis. As $\omega$ is increased, a more complex ``toroidal'' mode appears in which the bed takes the shape of a torus; in this mode, circulation occurs both about the cylinder axis, and also radially, with particles moving from the outer edge of the pan to the centre on the top surface of the bed, and back to the outer edge along the pan bottom. At the highest $\omega$, surface modulations (``surface waves'' and ``sectors'') of the toroidal mode occur. The origin of this family of behavior in terms of the pan motion is discussed.
  • The structure of the Al_{70}Pd_{21}Mn_{9} surface has been investigated using high resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). From two large five-fold terraces on the surface in a short decorated Fibonacci sequence, atomically resolved surface images have been obtained. One of these terraces carries a rare local configuration in a form of a ring. The location of the corresponding sequence of terminations in the bulk model M of icosahedral i-AlPdMn based on the three-dimensional tiling T*(2F) of an F-phase has been estimated using this ring configuration and the requirement from the LEED work of Gierer et al. that the average atomic density of the terminations is 0.136 atoms per A^2. A termination contains two atomic plane layers separated by a vertical distance of 0.48 A. The position of the bulk terminations is fixed within the layers of Bergman polytopes in the model M: they are 4.08 A in the direction of the bulk from a surface of the most dense Bergman layers. From the coding windows of the top planes in terminations in M we conclude that a Penrose (P1) tiling is possible on almost all five-fold terraces. The shortest edge of the tiling P1, is either 4.8 A or 7.8 A. The experimentally derived tiling of the surface with the ring configuration has an edge-length of 8.0 +- 0.3 A and hence matches the minimal edge-length expected from the model.
  • The present paper reports high-accuracy cross-section data for the 2H(n,nnp) reaction in the neutron-proton (np) and neutron-neutron (nn) final-state-interaction (FSI) regions at an incident mean neutron energy of 13.0 MeV. These data were analyzed with rigorous three-nucleon calculations to determine the 1S0 np and nn scattering lengths, a_np and a_nn. Our results are a_nn = -18.7 +/- 0.6 fm and a_np = -23.5 +/- 0.8 fm. Since our value for a_np obtained from neutron-deuteron (nd) breakup agrees with that from free np scattering, we conclude that our investigation of the nn FSI done simultaneously and under identical conditions gives the correct value for a_nn. Our value for a_nn is in agreement with that obtained in pion-deuteron capture measurements but disagrees with values obtained from earlier nd breakup studies.