• We present the results of our investigation of the star-forming complexes W51 and W43, two of the brightest in the first Galactic quadrant. In order to determine the young stellar object (YSO) populations in W51 and W43 we used color-magnitude relations based on Spitzer mid-infrared and 2MASS/UKIDSS near-infrared data. We identified 302 Class I YSOs and 1178 Class II/transition disk candidates in W51, and 917 Class I YSOs and 5187 Class II/transition disk candidates in W43. We also identified tens of groups of YSOs in both regions using the Minimal Spanning Tree (MST) method. We found similar cluster densities in both regions even though Spitzer was not able to probe the densest part of W43. By using the Class II/I ratios, we traced the relative ages within the regions and based on the morphology of the clusters we argue that several sites of star formation are independent of one another in terms of their ages and physical conditions. We used spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting to identify the massive YSO (MYSO) candidates since they play a vital role in the star formation process and then examined them to see if they are related to any massive star formation tracers such as UCH II regions, masers and dense fragments. We identified 17 MYSO candidates in W51, and 14 in W43, respectively and found that groups of YSOs hosting MYSO candidates are positionally associated with H II regions in W51, though we do not see any MYSO candidates associated with previously identified massive dense fragments in W43.
  • Context: The past decade has witnessed a large number of Galactic plane surveys at angular resolutions below 20". However, no comparable high-resolution survey exists at long radio wavelengths around 21cm in line and continuum emission. Methods: Employing the Very Large Array (VLA) in the C-array configuration and a large program, we observe the HI 21cm line, four OH lines, nineteen Halpha radio recombination lines as well as the continuum emission from 1 to 2GHz in full polarization over a large part of the first Galactic quadrant. Results: Covering Galactic longitudes from 14.5 to 67.4deg and latitudes between +-1.25deg, we image all of these lines and the continuum at ~20" resolution. These data allow us to study the various components of the interstellar medium (ISM): from the atomic phase, traced by the HI line, to the molecular phase, observed by the OH transitions, to the ionized medium, revealed by the cm continuum and the Halpha radio recombination lines. Furthermore, the polarized continuum emission enables magnetic field studies. In this overview paper, we discuss the survey outline and present the first data release as well as early results from the different datasets. We now release the first half of the survey; the second half will follow later after the ongoing data processing has been completed. The data in fits format (continuum images and line data cubes) can be accessed through the project web-page http://www.mpia.de/thor. Conclusions: The HI/OH/Recombination line survey of the Milky Way (THOR) opens a new window to the different parts of the ISM. It enables detailed studies of molecular cloud formation, conversion of atomic to molecular gas, and feedback from HII regions as well as the magnetic field in the Milky Way. It is highly complementary to other surveys of our Galaxy, and comparing different datasets allows us to address many open questions.
  • Previous literature suggests that the densest structures in the interstellar medium form through colliding flows, but patent evidence of this process is still missing. Recent literature proposes using SiO line emission to trace low-velocity shocks associated with cloud formation through collision. In this paper we investigate the bright and extended SiO(2-1) emission observed along the ~5 pc-long W43-MM1 ridge to determine its origin. We used high angular resolution images of the SiO(2-1) and HCN(1-0) emission lines obtained with the IRAM plateau de Bure (PdBI) interferometer and combined with data from the IRAM 30 m radiotelescope. These data were complemented by a Herschel column density map of the region. We performed spectral analysis of SiO and HCN emission line profiles to identify protostellar outflows and spatially disentangle two velocity components associated with low- and high-velocity shocks. Then, we compared the low-velocity shock component to a dedicated grid of one-dimensional (1D) radiative shock models. We find that the SiO emission originates from a mixture of high-velocity shocks caused by bipolar outflows and low-velocity shocks. Using SiO and HCN emission lines, we extract seven bipolar outflows associated with massive dense cores previously identified within the W43-MM1 mini-starburst cluster. Comparing observations with dedicated Paris-Durham shock models constrains the velocity of the low-velocity shock component from 7 to 12km/s. The SiO arising from low-velocity shocks spreads along the complete length of the ridge. Its contribution represents at least 45% and up to 100% of the total SiO emission depending on the area considered. The low-velocity component of SiO is most likely associated with the ridge formation through colliding flows or cloud-cloud collision.
  • The processes leading to the birth of high-mass stars are poorly understood. We characterise here a sample of 430 massive clumps from the ATLASGAL survey, which are representative of different evolutionary stages. To establish a census of molecular tracers of their evolution we performed an unbiased spectral line survey covering the 3-mm atmospheric window between 84-117 GHz with the IRAM 30m. A smaller sample of 128 clumps has been observed in the SiO (5-4) transition with the APEX telescope to complement the SiO (2-1) line and probe the excitation conditions of the emitting gas, which is the main focus of the current study. We report a high detection rate of >75% of the SiO (2-1) line and a >90% detection rate from the dedicated follow-ups in the (5-4) transition. The SiO (2-1) line with broad line profiles and high detection rates, is a powerful probe of star formation activity, while the ubiquitous detection of SiO in all evolutionary stages suggests a continuous star formation process in massive clumps. We find a large fraction of infrared-quiet clumps to exhibit SiO emission, the majority of them only showing a low-velocity component (FWHM~5-6 km/s) centred at the rest velocity of the clump. In the current picture, where this is attributed to low-velocity shocks from cloud-cloud collisions, this can be used to pinpoint the youngest, thus, likely prestellar massive structures. Based on the line ratio of the (5-4) to the (2-1) line, our study reveals a trend of changing excitation conditions that lead to brighter emission in the (5-4) line towards more evolved sources. Our analysis delivers a more robust estimate of SiO column density and abundance than previous studies and questions the decrease of jet activity in massive clumps as a function of age.
  • We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of $\sim$1.5$\times$10$^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.
  • We use PACS and SPIRE continuum data at 160 um, 250 um, 350 um, and 500 um from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey to sample seven clumps in Perseus: B1, B1-E, B5, IC348, L1448, L1455, and NGC1333. Additionally, we identify and characterize the embedded Class 0 protostars using detections of compact Herschel sources at 70 um as well as archival Spitzer catalogues and SCUBA 850 um photometric data. We identify 28 candidate Class 0 protostars, four of which are newly discovered sources not identified with Spitzer. We find that the star formation efficiency of clumps, as traced by Class 0 protostars, correlates strongly with the flatness of their respective column density distributions at high values. This correlation suggests that the fraction of high column density material in a clump reflects only its youngest protostellar population rather than its entire source population. We propose that feedback from either the formation or evolution of protostars changes the local density structure of clumps.
  • We present the results of Herschel HOBYS photometric mapping combined with BIMA observations and additional archival data, and perform an in-depth study of the evolutionary phases of the star-forming clumps in W 48A and their surroundings. Age estimates for the compact sources were derived from bolometric luminosities and envelope masses, which were obtained from the dust continuum emission, and agree within an order of magnitude with age estimates from molecular line and radio data. The clumps in W 48A are linearly aligned by age (east-old to west-young): we find a ultra compact (UC) HII region, a young stellar object (YSO) with class II methanol maser emission, a YSO with a massive outflow, and finally the NH_2D prestellar cores from Pillai et al. This remarkable positioning reflects the (star) formation history of the region. We find that it is unlikely that the star formation in the W 48A molecular cloud was triggered by the UCHII region and discuss the Aquila supershell expansion as a mayor influence on the evolution of W 48A. We conclude that the combination of Herschel continuum data with interferometric molecular line and radio continuum data is important to derive trustworthy age estimates and interpret the origin of large scale structures through kinematic information.
  • The density and temperature structures of dense cores in the L1495 cloud of the Taurus star-forming region are investigated using Herschel SPIRE and PACS images in the 70 $\mu$m, 160 $\mu$m, 250 $\mu$m, 350 $\mu$m and 500 $\mu$m continuum bands. A sample consisting of 20 cores, selected using spectral and spatial criteria, is analysed using a new maximum likelihood technique, COREFIT, which takes full account of the instrumental point spread functions. We obtain central dust temperatures, $T_0$, in the range 6-12 K and find that, in the majority of cases, the radial density falloff at large radial distances is consistent with the $r^{-2}$ variation expected for Bonnor-Ebert spheres. Two of our cores exhibit a significantly steeper falloff, however, and since both appear to be gravitationally unstable, such behaviour may have implications for collapse models. We find a strong negative correlation between $T_0$ and peak column density, as expected if the dust is heated predominantly by the interstellar radiation field. At the temperatures we estimate for the core centres, carbon-bearing molecules freeze out as ice mantles on dust grains, and this behaviour is supported here by the lack of correspondence between our estimated core locations and the previously-published positions of H$^{13}$CO$^+$ peaks. On this basis, our observations suggest a sublimation-zone radius typically $\sim 10^4$ AU. Comparison with previously-published N$_2$H$^+$ data at 8400 AU resolution, however, shows no evidence for N$_2$H$^+$ depletion at that resolution.
  • We present the Herschel Gould Belt survey maps of the L1641 molecular clouds in Orion A. We extracted both the filaments and dense cores in the region. We identified which of dense sources are proto- or pre-stellar, and studied their association with the identified filaments. We find that although most (71%) of the pre-stellar sources are located on filaments there is still a significant fraction of sources not associated with such structures. We find that these two populations (on and off the identified filaments) have distinctly different mass distributions. The mass distribution of the sources on the filaments is found to peak at 4 Solar masses and drives the shape of the CMF at higher masses, which we fit with a power law of the form dN/dlogM \propto M^{-1.4+/-0.4}. The mass distribution of the sources off the filaments, on the other hand, peaks at 0.8 Solar masses and leads to a flattening of the CMF at masses lower than ~4 Solar masses. We postulate that this difference between the mass distributions is due to the higher proportion of gas that is available in the filaments, rather than in the diffuse cloud.
  • We present the first overview of the Herschel observations of the nearby high-mass star-forming region NGC 7538, taken as part of the Herschel imaging study of OB Young Stellar objects (HOBYS) Key Programme. These PACS and SPIRE maps cover an approximate area of one square degree at five submillimeter and far-infrared wavebands. We have identified 780 dense sources and classified 224 of those. With the intention of investigating the existence of cold massive starless or class 0-like clumps that would have the potential to form intermediate- to high-mass stars, we further isolate 13 clumps as the most likely candidates for followup studies. These 13 clumps have masses in excess of 40 M_sun and temperatures below 15 K. They range in size from 0.4 pc to 2.5 pc and have densities between 3x10^3 cm^-3 to 4x10^4 cm^-3. Spectral energy distributions are then used to characterize their energetics and evolutionary state through a luminosity-mass diagram. NGC 7538 has a highly filamentary structure, previously unseen in the dust continuum of existing submillimeter surveys. We report the most complete imaging to date of a large, evacuated ring of material in NGC 7538 which is bordered by many cool sources.
  • The whole of the Taurus region (a total area of 52 sq. deg.) has been observed by the Herschel SPIRE and PACS instruments at wavelengths of 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 {\mu}m as part of the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. In this paper we present the first results from the part of the Taurus region that includes the Barnard 18 and L1536 clouds. A new source-finding routine, the Cardiff Source-finding AlgoRithm (CSAR), is introduced, which is loosely based on CLUMPFIND, but that also generates a structure tree, or dendrogram, which can be used to interpret hierarchical clump structure in a complex region. Sources were extracted from the data using the hierarchical version of CSAR and plotted on a mass-size diagram. We found a hierarchy of objects with sizes in the range 0.024-2.7 pc. Previous studies showed that gravitationally bound prestellar cores and unbound starless clumps appeared in different places on the mass-size diagram. However, it was unclear whether this was due to a lack of instrumental dynamic range or whether they were actually two distinct populations. The excellent sensitivity of Herschel shows that our sources fill the gap in the mass-size plane between starless and pre-stellar cores, and gives the first clear supporting observational evidence for the theory that unbound clumps and (gravitationally bound) prestellar cores are all part of the same population, and hence presumably part of the same evolutionary sequence (c.f. Simpson et al. 2011).
  • We present a study of the star formation histories of the Lupus I, III, and IV clouds using the Herschel 70-500 micron maps obtained by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey Key Project. By combining the new Herschel data with the existing Spitzer catalog we obtained an unprecedented census of prestellar sources and young stellar objects in the Lupus clouds, which allowed us to study the overall star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE). The high SFE of Lupus III, its decreasing SFR, and its large number of pre-main sequence stars with respect to proto- and prestellar sources, suggest that Lupus III is the most evolved cloud, and after having experienced a major star formation event in the past, is now approaching the end of its current star-forming cycle. Lupus I is currently undergoing a large star formation event, apparent by the increasing SFR, the large number of prestellar objects with respect to more evolved objects, and the high percentage of material at high extinction (e.g., above A_V=8 mag). Also Lupus IV has an increasing SFR; however, the relative number of prestellar sources is much lower, suggesting that its star formation has not yet reached its peak.
  • We present APEX/P-ArT\'eMiS 450\mu m continuum observations of RCW 36 and the adjacent ridge, a high-mass high-column density filamentary structure at the centre of the Vela C molecular cloud. These observations, at higher resolution than Herschel's SPIRE camera, reveal clear fragmentation of the central star-forming ridge. Combined with PACS far-infrared and SPIRE sub-millimetre observations from the Herschel HOBYS project we build a high resolution column density map of the region mapped with P-ArT\'eMiS. We extract the radial density profile of the Vela C ridge which with a ~ 0.1pc central width is consistent with that measured for low-mass star-forming filaments in the Herschel Gould Belt survey. Direct comparison with Serpens South, of the Gould Belt Aquila complex, reveals many similarities between the two regions. Despite likely different formation mechanisms and histories, the Vela C ridge and Serpens South filament share common characteristics, including their filament central widths.
  • We report far-IR Herschel observations obtained between 70 $\mu$m and 500 $\mu$m of two star-forming dusty condensations, B1-bS and B1-bN, in the B1 region of the Perseus star-forming cloud. In the Western part of the Perseus cloud, B1-bS is the only source detected in all of the 6 PACS and SPIRE photometric bands without being visible in the Spitzer map at 24 $\mu$m. B1-bN is clearly detected between 100 $\mu$m and 250 $\mu$m. We have fitted the spectral energy distributions of these sources to derive their physical properties, and find that a simple greybody model fails to reproduce the observed SEDs. At least a two-component model, consisting of a central source surrounded by a dusty envelope is required. The properties derived from the fit, however, suggest that the central source is not a Class 0 object. We then conclude that while B1-bS and B1-bN appear to be more evolved than a pre-stellar core, the best-fit models suggest that their central objects are younger than a Class 0 source. Hence, they may be good candidates to be examples of the first hydrostatic core phase. The projected distance between B1-bS and B1-bN is a few Jeans lengths. If their physical separation is close to this value, this pair would allow the mutual interactions between two forming stars at a very early stage of their evolution to be studied.
  • For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peaked PDF we interprete as caused by shock compression. The deviations of the PDF from the log-normal shape typically associated with low- and high-mass star-forming regions at Av~3-4m and 8-10m, respectively, are found here within the very same cloud. This shows that there is no fundamental difference in the density structure of low- and high-mass star-forming regions. We conclude that star-formation in Rosette - and probably in high-mass star-forming clouds in general - is not globally triggered by the impact of UV-radiation. Moreover, star formation takes place in filaments that arose from the primordial turbulent structure built up during the formation of the cloud. Clusters form at filament mergers, but star formation can be locally induced in the direct interaction zone between an expanding HII--region and the molecular cloud.
  • The ATLASGAL 870mum continuum survey conducted with the APEX telescope is the first survey covering the whole inner Galactic plane (60deg>l>-60deg & b<1.5deg) in submm continuum emission tracing the cold dust of dense and young star-forming regions. Here, we present the overall distribution of sources within our Galactic disk. The submm continuum emission is confined to a narrow range around the galactic plane, but shifted on average by ~0.07deg below the plane. Source number counts show strong enhancements toward the Galactic center, the spiral arms and toward prominent star-forming regions. Comparing the distribution of ATLASGAL dust continuum emission to that of young intermediate- to high-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) derived from Spitzer data, we find similarities as well as differences. In particular, the distribution of submm dust continuum emission is significantly more confined to the plane than the YSO distribution (FWHM of 0.7 and 1.1deg, corresponding to mean physical scale heights of approximately 46 and 80pc, respectively). While this difference may partly be caused by the large extinction from the dense submm cores, gradual dispersal of stellar distributions after their birth could also contribute to this effect. Compared to other tracers of Galactic structure, the ATLASGAL data are strongly confined to a narrow latitude strip around the Galactic plane.
  • Context: The earliest stages of high-mass star formation are still poorly characterized. It is also unknown whether the initial conditions vary with environment. Aims: We want to investigate the youngest massive gas clumps in the environment of extremely active star formation. Methods: We selected the IRDC18454 complex associated with the W43 Galactic mini-starburst, and observed it in the continuum emission between 70mu and 1.2mm, and in spectral line emission of N2H+ and 13CO with single-dish instruments and an interferometer. Results: The multi-wavelength continuum study allows us to identify clumps that are infrared dark even at 70mu and hence the best candidates to be genuine high-mass starless gas clumps. The spectral energy distributions reveal elevated temperatures and luminosities compared to more quiescent environments. Furthermore, we identify a temperature gradient from the W43 mini-starburst toward the starless clumps. We discuss whether the radiation impact of the nearby mini-starburst changes the fragmentation properties of the gas clumps and by that maybe favors more high-mass star formation in such an environment. The spectral line data reveal two different velocity components of the gas at 100 and 50km/s. While chance projection is a possibility to explain these components, the projected associations of the emission sources as well as the prominent location at the Galactic bar -- spiral arm interface also allow the possibility that these two components may be spatially associated and even interacting. Conclusions: High-mass starless gas clumps can exist in the close environment of very active star formation without being destroyed. The impact of the active star formation sites may even allow for more high-mass stars to form in these 2nd generation gas clumps.
  • Aims: To explore the infrared and radio properties of one of the closest Galactic starburst regions. Methods: Images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory at wavelengths of 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using the PACS and SPIRE arrays are analyzed and compared with radio continuum VLA data and 8 micron images from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The morphology of the far-infrared emission is combined with radial velocity measurements of millimeter and centimeter wavelength transitions to identify features likely to be associated with the W43 complex. Results: The W43 star-forming complex is resolved into a dense cluster of protostars, infrared dark clouds, and ridges of warm dust heated by massive stars. The 4 brightest compact sources with L > 1.5 x 10^4 Lsun embedded within the Z-shaped ridge of bright dust emission in W43 remain single at 4" (0.1 pc) resolution. These objects, likely to be massive protostars or compact clusters in early stages of evolution are embedded in clumps with masses of 10^3 to 10^4 Msun, but contribute only 2% to the 3.6 x 10^6 Lsun far-IR luminosity of W43 measured in a 16 by 16 pc box. The total mass of gas derived from the far-IR dust emission inside this region is ~10^6 Msun. Cometary dust clouds, compact 6 cm radio sources, and warm dust mark the locations of older populations of massive stars. Energy release has created a cavity blowing-out below the Galactic plane. Compression of molecular gas in the plane by the older HII region near G30.684-0.260 and the bipolar structure of the resulting younger W43 HII region may have triggered the current mini-star burst.