• Bismuthates were the first family of oxide high-temperature superconductors, exhibiting superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) up to 32K, but the superconducting mechanism remains under debate despite more than 30 years of extensive research. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on Ba$_{0.51}$K$_{0.49}$BiO$_3$ reveal an unexpectedly 34% larger bandwidth than in conventional density functional theory calculations. This can be reproduced by calculations that fully account for long-range Coulomb interactions --- the first direct demonstration of bandwidth expansion due to the Fock exchange term, a long-accepted and yet uncorroborated fundamental effect in many body physics. Furthermore, we observe an isotropic superconducting gap with 2\Delta$_0$/k$_B$ T$_c$ = 3.51 $\pm$ 0.05, and strong electron-phonon interactions with a coupling constant \lambda$\sim$ 1.3 $\pm$ 0.2. These findings solve a long-standing mystery --- Ba$_{0.51}$K$_{0.49}$BiO$_3$ is an extraordinary Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductor, where long-range Coulomb interactions expand the bandwidth, enhance electron-phonon coupling, and generate the high Tc. Such effects will also be critical for finding new superconductors.
  • Bulk FeSe is superconducting with a critical temperature $T_c$ $\cong$ 8 K and SrTiO$_3$ is insulating in nature, yet high-temperature superconductivity has been reported at the interface between a single-layer FeSe and SrTiO$_3$. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements observe a gap opening at the Fermi surface below $\approx$ 60 K. Elucidating the microscopic properties and understanding the pairing mechanism of single-layer FeSe is of utmost importance as it is a basic building block of iron-based superconductors. Here, we use the low-energy muon spin rotation/relaxation technique (LE-$\mu$SR) to detect and quantify the supercarrier density and determine the gap symmetry in FeSe grown on SrTiO$_3$ (100). Measurements in applied field show a temperature dependent broadening of the field distribution below $\sim$ 60 K, reflecting the superconducting transition and formation of a vortex state. Zero field measurements rule out the presence of magnetism of static or fluctuating origin. From the inhomogeneous field distribution, we determine an effective sheet supercarrier density $n_s^{2D} \simeq 6 \times 10^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$ at $T \rightarrow 0$ K, which is a factor of 4 larger than expected from ARPES measurements of the excess electron count per Fe of 1 monolayer (ML) FeSe. The temperature dependence of the superfluid density $n_s(T)$ can be well described down to $\sim$ 10 K by simple s-wave BCS, indicating a rather clean superconducting phase with a gap of 10.2(1.1) meV. The result is a clear indication of the gradual formation of a two dimensional vortex lattice existing over the entire large FeSe/STO interface and provides unambiguous evidence for robust superconductivity below 60 K in ultrathin FeSe.
  • The dream of room temperature superconductors has inspired intense research effort to find routes for enhancing the superconducting transition temperature (Tc). Therefore, single-layer FeSe on a SrTiO3 substrate, with its extraordinarily high Tc amongst all interfacial superconductors and iron based superconductors, is particularly interesting, but the mechanism underlying its high Tc has remained mysterious. Here we show through isotope effects that electrons in FeSe couple with the oxygen phonons in the substrate, and the superconductivity is enhanced linearly with the coupling strength atop the intrinsic superconductivity of heavily-electron-doped FeSe. Our observations solve the enigma of FeSe/SrTiO3, and experimentally establish the critical role and unique behavior of electron-phonon forward scattering in a correlated high-Tc superconductor. The effective cooperation between interlayer electron-phonon interactions and correlations suggests a path forward in developing more high-Tc interfacial superconductors, and may shed light on understanding the high Tc of bulk high temperature superconductors with layered structures.
  • Hexagonal FeSe thin films were grown on SrTiO3 substrates and the temperature and thickness dependence of their electronic structures were studied. The hexagonal FeSe is found to be metallic and electron doped, whose Fermi surface consists of six elliptical electron pockets. With decreased temperature, parts of the bands shift downward to high binding energy while some bands shift upwards to EF. The shifts of these bands begin around 300 K and saturate at low temperature, indicating a magnetic phase transition temperature of about 300 K. With increased film thickness, the Fermi surface topology and band structure show no obvious change except some minor quantum size effect. Our paper reports the first electronic structure of hexagonal FeSe, and shows that the possible magnetic transition is driven by large scale electronic structure reconstruction.
  • Extremely high magnetoresistance (XMR) in the lanthanum monopnictides La$X$ ($X$ = Sb, Bi) has recently attracted interest in these compounds as candidate topological materials. However, their perfect electron-hole compensation provides an alternative explanation, so the possible role of topological surface states requires verification through direct observation. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data reveal multiple Dirac-like surface states near the Fermi level in both materials. Intriguingly, we have observed circular dichroism in both surface and near-surface bulk bands. Thus the spin-orbit coupling-induced orbital and spin angular momentum textures may provide a mechanism to forbid backscattering in zero field, suggesting that surface and near-surface bulk bands may contribute strongly to XMR in La$X$. The extremely simple rock salt structure of these materials and the ease with which high-quality crystals can be prepared suggests that they may be an ideal platform for further investigation of topological matter.
  • Iron chalcogenide superconductors are multi-band systems with strong electron correlations. Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study band dependent correlation effects in single-layer FeSe/Nb:BaTiO3/KTaO3, a new iron chalcogenide superconductor with non-degenerate electron pockets and interface-enhanced superconductivity. The non-degeneracy of the electron bands helps to resolve the temperature dependent evolution of different bands. With increasing temperature, the single layer FeSe undergoes a band-selective localization, in which the coherent spectral weight of one electron band is completely depleted while that of the other one remains finite. In addition, the spectral weight of the incoherent background is enhanced with increasing temperature, indicating a coherent-incoherent crossover. Signatures of polaronic behavior are observed, suggesting electron-boson interactions. These phenomena help to construct a more complete picture of electron correlations in the FeSe family.
  • The electronic structure of FeSe thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrate is studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We reveal the existence of Dirac cone band dispersions in FeSe thin films thicker than 1 Unit Cell below the nematic transition temperature, whose apex are located -10 meV below Fermi energy. The evolution of Dirac cone electronic structure for FeSe thin films as function of temperature, thickness and cobalt doping is systematically studied. The Dirac cones are found to be coexisted with the nematicity in FeSe, disappear when nematicity is suppressed. Our results provide some indication that the spin degrees of freedom may play some kind of role in the nematicity of FeSe.
  • In FeSe-derived superconductors, the lack of a systematic and clean control on the carrier concentration prevents the comprehensive understanding on the phase diagram and the interplay between different phases. Here by K dosing and angle resolved photoemission study on thick FeSe films and FeSe$_{0.93}$S$_{0.07}$ bulk crystals, the phase diagram of FeSe as a function of electron doping is established, which is extraordinarily different from other Fe-based superconductors. The correlation strength remarkably increases with increasing doping, while an insulting phase emerges in the heavily overdoped regime. Between the nematic phase and the insulating phase, a dome of enhanced superconductivity is observed, with the maximum superconducting transition temperature of 44$\pm$2~K. The enhanced superconductivity is independent of the thickness of FeSe, indicating that it is intrinsic to FeSe. Our findings provide an ideal system with variable doping for understanding the different phases and rich physics in the FeSe family.
  • Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we revealed the surface electronic structure and superconducting gap of (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe, an intercalated FeSe-derived superconductor without antiferromagnetic phase or Fe-vacancy order in the FeSe layers, and with a superconducting transition temperature ($T_c$) $\sim$ 40 K. We found that (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OH layers dope electrons into FeSe layers. The electronic structure of surface FeSe layers in (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe resembles that of Rb$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$ except that it only contains half of the carriers due to the polar surface, suggesting similar quasiparticle dynamics between bulk (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe and Rb$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$. Superconducting gap is clearly observed below $T_c$, with an isotropic distribution around the electron Fermi surface. Compared with $A_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$ (\textit{A}=K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K), the higher $T_c$ in (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe might be attributed to higher homogeneity of FeSe layers or to some unknown roles played by the (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OH layers.
  • In the quest for high temperature superconductors, the interface between a metal and a dielectric was proposed to possibly achieve very high superconducting transition temperature ($T_c$) through interface-assisted pairing. Recently, in single layer FeSe (SLF) films grown on SrTiO$_3$ substrates, signs for $T_c$ up to 65~K have been reported. However, besides doping electrons and imposing strain, whether and how the substrate facilitates the superconductivity are still unclear. Here we report the growth of various SLF films on thick BaTiO$_3$ films atop KTaO$_3$ substrates, with signs for $T_c$ up to $75$~K, close to the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature. SLF of similar doping and lattice is found to exhibit high $T_c$ only if it is on the substrate, and its band structure strongly depends on the substrate. Our results highlight the profound role of substrate on the high-$T_c$ in SLF, and provide new clues for understanding its mechanism.
  • We report {\beta} detected nuclear magnetic resonance ({\beta}NMR) measurements of 8Li+ implanted into high purity Pt. The frequency of the 8Li {\beta}NMR resonance and the spin-lattice relaxation rates 1/T1 were measured at temperatures ranging from 3 to 300 K. Remarkably, both the spin-lattice relaxation rate and the Knight shift K depend linearly on temperature T although the bulk susceptibility does not. K is found to scale with the Curie-Weiss dependence of the Pt susceptibility extrapolated to low temperatures. This is attributed to a defect response of the enhanced paramagnetism of Pt, i.e. the presence of the interstitial Li+ locally relieves the tendency for the Curie-Weiss susceptibility to saturate at low T . We propose that the low temperature saturation in \c{hi} of Pt may be related to an interband coupling between the s and d bands that is disrupted locally by the presence of the Li+.
  • We report beta-NMR investigations of polarized 8Li implanted in thin Pb and Ag/Nb films. At the critical superconducting temperature, we observe a singular peak in the spin relaxation rate in small longitudinal magnetic fields, which is attributed to fluctuations in the superconducting order parameter. However, the peak is more than an order of magnitude larger than the prediction based on the enhancement of the dynamic electron spin susceptibility by superconducting fluctuations and reflects the presence of unexpected slow fluctuations. Furthermore the fluctuations are rapidly suppressed in a small magnetic field, which may explain why they have not been observed previously with conventional NMR or NQR.
  • With the unique database from Michelson Doppler Imager aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in an interval embodying solar cycle 23, the cyclic behavior of solar small-scale magnetic elements is studied. More than 13 million small-scale magnetic elements are selected, and the following results are unclosed. (1) The quiet regions dominated the Sun's magnetic flux for about 8 years in the 12.25 year duration of Cycle 23. They contributed (0.94 - 1.44) $\times 10^{23}$ Mx flux to the Sun from the solar minimum to maximum. The monthly average magnetic flux of the quiet regions is 1.12 times that of active regions in the cycle. (2) The ratio of quiet region flux to that of the total Sun equally characterizes the course of a solar cycle. The 6-month running-average flux ratio of quiet region had been larger than 90.0% for 28 continuous months from July 2007 to October 2009, which characterizes very well the grand solar minima of Cycles 23-24. (3) From the small to large end of the flux spectrum, the variations of numbers and total flux of the network elements show no-correlation, anti-correlation, and correlation with sunspots, respectively. The anti-correlated elements, covering the flux of (2.9 - 32.0)$\times 10^{18}$ Mx, occupies 77.2% of total element number and 37.4% of quiet Sun flux. These results provide insight into reason for anti-correlated variations of small-scale magnetic activity during the solar cycle.
  • With the unique database from Michelson Doppler Imager aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in an interval embodying solar cycle 23, the cyclic behavior of solar small-scale magnetic elements is studied. More than 13 million small-scale magnetic elements are selected, and the following results are unclosed. (1) The quiet regions dominated the Sun\textsf{'}s magnetic flux for about 8 years in the 12.25 year duration of Cycle 23. They contributed (0.94 -- 1.44) $\times 10^{23}$ Mx flux to the Sun from the solar minimum to maximum. The monthly average magnetic flux of the quiet regions is 1.12 times that of active regions in the cycle. (2) The ratio of quiet region flux to that of the total Sun equally characterizes the course of a solar cycle. The 6-month running-average flux ratio of quiet region had been larger than 90.0% for 28 continuous months from July 2007 to October 2009, which characterizes very well the grand solar minima of Cycles 23-24. (3) From the small to large end of the flux spectrum, the variations of numbers and total flux of the network elements show no-correlation, anti-correlation, and correlation with sunspots, respectively. The anti-correlated elements, covering the flux of (2.9 - 32.0)$\times 10^{18}$ Mx, occupies 77.2% of total element number and 37.4% of quiet Sun flux. These results provide insight into reason for anti-correlated variations of small-scale magnetic activity during the solar cycle.
  • Weak spontaneous magnetic fields are observed near the surface of YBCO films using Beta-detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Below Tc, the magnetic field distribution in a silver film evaporated onto the superconductor shows additional line broadening, indicating the appearance of small disordered magnetic fields. The line broadening increases linearly with a weak external magnetic field applied parallel to the surface, and is depth-independent up to 45 nm from the Ag/YBCO interface. The magnitude of the line broadening at 10 K extrapolated to zero applied field is less than 0.2 G, and is close to nuclear dipolar broadening in the Ag. This indicates that any fields due to broken time-reversal symmetry are less than 0.2 G.
  • Beta-NMR has been used to study vortex lattice disorder near the surface of the high-Tc superconductor YBCO. The magnetic field distribution from the vortex lattice was detected by implanting a low energy beam of highly polarized 8Li into a thin overlayer of silver on optimally doped, twinned and detwinned YBCO samples. The resonance in Ag broadens significantly below the transition temperature Tc as expected from the emerging field lines of the vortex lattice in YBCO. However, the lineshape is more symmetric and the dependence on the applied magnetic field is much weaker than expected from an ideal vortex lattice, indicating that the vortex density varies across the face of the sample, likely due to pinning at twin boundaries. At low temperatures the broadening from such disorder does not scale with the superfluid density.
  • We report single-mode lasing in subwavelength GaAs disks under optical pumping. The disks are fabricated by standard photolithography and two steps of wet chemical etching. The simple fabrication method can produce submicron disks with good circularity, smooth boundary and vertical sidewalls. The smallest lasing disks have a diameter of 627 nm and thickness of 265 nm. The ratio of the disk diameter to the vacuum lasing wavelength is about 0.7. Our numerical simulations confirm that the lasing modes are whispering-gallery modes with the azimuthal number as small as 4 and very small mode volume.
  • The temperature dependence of the frequency shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate of isolated, nonmagnetic Li-8 impurities implanted in a nearly ferromagnetic host (Pd) are measured by means of beta-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (b-NMR). The shift is negative, very large and increases monotonically with decreasing T in proportion to the bulk susceptibility of Pd for T > T*~ 100 K. Below T*, an additional shift occurs which we attribute to the response of Pd to the defect. The relaxation rate is much slower than expected for the large shift and is linear with T below T*, showing no sign of additional relaxation mechanisms associated with the defect.