• Aims: We aim to understand the fragmentation as well as the disk formation, outflow generation and chemical processes during high-mass star formation on spatial scales of individual cores. Methods: Using the IRAM Northern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) in combination with the 30m telescope, we have observed in the IRAM large program CORE the 1.37mm continuum and spectral line emission at high angular resolution (~0.4'') for a sample of 20 well-known high-mass star-forming regions with distances below 5.5kpc and luminosities larger than 10^4Lsun. Results: We present the overall survey scope, the selected sample, the observational setup and the main goals of CORE. Scientifically, we concentrate on the mm continuum emission on scales on the order of 1000AU. We detect strong mm continuum emission from all regions, mostly due to the emission from cold dust. The fragmentation properties of the sample are diverse. We see extremes where some regions are dominated by a single high-mass core whereas others fragment into as many as 20 cores. A minimum-spanning-tree analysis finds fragmentation at scales on the order of the thermal Jeans length or smaller suggesting that turbulent fragmentation is less important than thermal gravitational fragmentation. The diversity of highly fragmented versus singular regions can be explained by varying initial density structures and/or different initial magnetic field strengths. Conclusions: The smallest observed separations between cores are found around the angular resolution limit which indicates that further fragmentation likely takes place on even smaller spatial scales. The CORE project with its numerous spectral line detections will address a diverse set of important physical and chemical questions in the field of high-mass star formation.
  • We measured the electromagnetic stress-induced local strain distribution on a centimeter-sized parallel-plate metallic resonant unit illuminated with microwave. Using a fiber interferometer, we found that the strain changes sign across the resonant unit, in agreement with theoretical predictions that the attractive electric and repulsive magnetic forces act at different locations. The enhancement of the corresponding maximum local electromagnetic stress is stronger than the enhancement of the net force, reaching a factor of >600 compared to the ordinary radiation pressure.
  • Electrons accelerated in relativistic collisionless shocks are usually assumed to follow a power-law energy distribution with an index of $p$. Observationally, although most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have afterglows that are consistent with $p>2$, there are still a few GRBs suggestive of a hard ($p<2$) electron energy spectrum. Our previous works found strong evidence for the exist of a double power-law hard electron energy (DPLH) spectrum with $1<p_1<2$, $p_2>2$ and an injection break assumed as $\gamma_{\rm b}\propto \gamma^{q}$ in the relativistic regime. Moreover, these works suggested a possibly universal value of $q\sim0.5$. GRB~060908 is another case that shows a flat spectrum in the optical/near-infrared band and requires a hard electron energy distribution, which, along with the rich multi-band afterglow data, provides us an opportunity to test this conjecture. Based on the model of \citet{Resmi08}, we explain the multi-band afterglow of GRB~060908 in a wind medium and take also the synchrotron self-Compton effect. We show that though the DPLH spectrum is favored by the afterglow data, the value of $q$ is badly constrained due to the relatively large uncertainties of the spectral indices. However, the afterglow can be well reproduced if we adopt $q=0.5$, implying the compatibility of the above conjecture with the data.
  • Electrons accelerated in relativistic collisionless shocks are usually assumed to follow a power-law energy distribution with an index of $p$. Observationally, although most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have afterglows that are consistent with $p>2$, there are still a few GRBs suggestive of a hard ($p<2$) electron energy spectrum. Our previous work showed that GRB 091127 gave strong evidence for a double power-law hard electron energy (DPLH) spectrum with $1<p_1<2$, $p_2>2$ and an "injection break" assumed as $\gamma_{\rm b}\propto \gamma^q$ in the highly relativistic regime, where $\gamma$ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet. In this paper, we show that GRB 060614 and GRB 060908 provide further evidence for such a DPLH spectrum. We interpret the multi-band afterglow of GRB 060614 with the DPLH model in an homogeneous interstellar medium by taking into account a continuous energy injection process, while for GRB 060908, a wind-like circumburst density profile is used. The two bursts, along with GRB 091127, suggest a similar behavior in the evolution of the injection break, with $q\sim0.5$. Whether this represents a universal law of the injection break remains uncertain and more such afterglow observations are needed to test this conjecture.
  • The purpose of this note is to compare various approximation methods as applied to the inverse of the Bessel function of the first kind, in a given domain of the complex plane.
  • The star formation rate in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) is an order of magnitude lower than predicted according to star formation relations that have been calibrated in the disc of our own and nearby galaxies. Understanding how and why star formation appears to be different in this region is crucial if we are to understand the environmental dependence of the star formation process. Here, we present the detection of a sample of high-mass cores in the CMZ's "dust ridge" that have been discovered with the Submillimeter Array as part of the CMZoom survey. These cores range in mass from ~ 50 - 2150 Msun within radii of 0.1 - 0.25 pc. All appear to be young (pre-UCHII), meaning that they are prime candidates for representing the initial conditions of high-mass stars and sub-clusters. We report that at least two of these cores ('c1' and 'e1') contain young, high-mass protostars. We compare all of the detected cores with high-mass cores in the Galactic disc and find that they are broadly similar in terms of their masses and sizes, despite being subjected to external pressures that are several orders of magnitude greater - ~ 10^8 K/cm^3, as opposed to ~ 10^5 K/cm^3. The fact that > 80% of these cores do not show any signs of star-forming activity in such a high-pressure environment leads us to conclude that this is further evidence for an increased critical density threshold for star formation in the CMZ due to turbulence.
  • This work investigates the high-pressure structure of freestanding superconducting ($T_{c}$ = 4.3\,K) boron doped diamond (BDD) and how it affects the electronic and vibrational properties using Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction in the 0-30\,GPa range. High-pressure Raman scattering experiments revealed an abrupt change in the linear pressure coefficients and the grain boundary components undergo an irreversible phase change at 14\,GPa. We show that the blue shift in the pressure-dependent vibrational modes correlates with the negative pressure coefficient of $T_{c}$ in BDD. The analysis of x-ray diffraction data determines the equation of state of the BDD film, revealing a high bulk modulus of $B_{0}$=510$\pm$28\,GPa. The comparative analysis of high-pressure data clarified that the sp$^{2}$ carbons in the grain boundaries transform into hexagonal diamond.
  • Weyl (WSMs) evolve from Dirac semimetals in the presence of broken time-reversal symmetry (TRS) or space-inversion symmetry. The WSM phases in TaAs-class materials and photonic crystals are due to the loss of space-inversion symmetry. For TRS-breaking WSMs, despite numerous theoretical and experimental efforts, few examples have been reported. In this Article, we report a new type of magnetic semimetal Sr1-yMn1-zSb2 (y,z<0.1) with nearly massless relativistic fermion behaviour (m*=0.04-0.05m0, where m0 is the free electron mass). This material exhibits a ferromagnetic order for 304K < T < 565K, but a canted antiferromagnetic order with a ferromagnetic component for T < 304K. The combination of relativistic fermion behaviour and ferromagnetism in Sr1-yMn1-zSb2 offers a rare opportunity to investigate the interplay between relativistic fermions and spontaneous TRS breaking.
  • The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of pathogenesis for many retina diseases. The formation of drusen in the retina is characteristic of retinal degeneration. We investigate morphological changes in the RPE in the presence of soft drusen using an integrated experimental and modeling approach. We collect RPE flat mount images from donated human eyes and develop 1) statistical tools to quantify the images and 2) a cell-based model to simulate the morphology evolution. We compare three different mechanisms of RPE repair evolution, cell apoptosis, cell fusion, and expansion, and Simulations of our RPE morphogenesis model quantitatively reproduce deformations of human RPE morphology due to drusen, suggesting that a purse-string mechanism is sufficient to explain how RPE heals cell loss caused by drusen-damage. We found that drusen beneath tissue promote cell death in a number that far exceeds the cell numbers covering the drusen. Tissue deformations are studied using area distributions, Voronoi domains and a texture tensor.
  • We targeted the massive star forming region W33A using the Atacama Large Sub/Millimeter Array (ALMA) in band 6 (230 GHz) and 7 (345 GHz) to search for a sub-1000au disc around the central O-type massive young stellar object (MYSO) W33A MM1-Main. Our data achieves a resolution of ~0.2" (~500au) and resolves the central core, MM1, into multiple components and reveals complex and filamentary structures. There is strong molecular line emission covering the entire MM1 region. The kinematic signatures are inconsistent with only Keplerian rotation although we propose that the shift in the emission line centroids within ~1000au of MM1-Main could hint at an underlying compact disc with Keplerian rotation. We cannot however rule out the possibility of an unresolved binary or multiple system. A putative smaller disc could be fed by the large scale spiral `feeding filament' we detect in both gas and dust emission. We also discuss the nature of the now-resolved continuum sources.
  • We present 1.05 mm ALMA observations of the deeply embedded high-mass protocluster G11.92-0.61, designed to search for low-mass cores within the accretion reservoir of the massive protostars. Our ALMA mosaic, which covers an extent of ~0.7 pc at sub-arcsecond (~1400 au) resolution, reveals a rich population of 16 new millimetre continuum sources surrounding the three previously-known millimetre cores. Most of the new sources are located in the outer reaches of the accretion reservoir: the median projected separation from the central, massive (proto)star MM1 is ~0.17 pc. The derived physical properties of the new millimetre continuum sources are consistent with those of low-mass prestellar and protostellar cores in nearby star-forming regions: the median mass, radius, and density of the new sources are 1.3 Msun, 1600 au, and n(H2)~10^7 cm^-3. At least three of the low-mass cores in G11.92-0.61 drive molecular outflows, traced by high-velocity 12CO(3-2) (observed with the SMA) and/or by H2CO and CH3OH emission (observed with ALMA). This finding, combined with the known outflow/accretion activity of MM1, indicates that high- and low-mass stars are forming (accreting) simultaneously within this protocluster. Our ALMA results are consistent with the predictions of competitive-accretion-type models in which high-mass stars form along with their surrounding clusters.
  • A solid conducts heat through both transverse and longitudinal acoustic phonons, but a liquid employs only longitudinal vibrations. Here, we report that the crystalline solid AgCrSe2 has liquid-like thermal conduction. In this compound, Ag atoms exhibit a dynamic duality that they are exclusively involved in intense low-lying transverse acoustic phonons while they also undergo local fluctuations inherent in an order-to-disorder transition occurring at 450 K. As a consequence of this extreme disorder-phonon coupling, transverse acoustic phonons become damped as approaching the transition temperature, above which they are not defined anymore because their lifetime is shorter than the relaxation time of local fluctuations. Nevertheless, the damped longitudinal acoustic phonon survives for thermal transport. This microscopic insight might reshape the fundamental idea on thermal transport properties of matter and facilitates the optimization of thermoelectrics.
  • We perform a magneto-infrared spectroscopy study of the semiconductor to semimetal transition of InAs/GaSb double quantum wells from the normal to the inverted state. We show that owing to the low carrier density of our samples (approaching the intrinsic limit), the magneto-absorption spectra evolve from a single cyclotron resonance peak in the normal state to multiple absorption peaks in the inverted state with distinct magnetic field dependence. Using an eight-band Pidgeon-Brown model, we explain all the major absorption peaks observed in our experiment. We demonstrate that the semiconductor to semimetal transition can be realized by manipulating the quantum confinement, the strain, and the magnetic field. Our work paves the way for band engineering of optimal InAs/GaSb structures for realizing novel topological states as well as for device applications in the terahertz regime.
  • $Aims.$ We study the relation between the jet and the outflow in the IRAS 04166+2706 protostar. This Taurus protostar drives a molecular jet that contains multiple emission peaks symmetrically located from the central source. The protostar also drives a wide-angle outflow consisting of two conical shells. $Methods.$ We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) interferometer to observe two fields along the IRAS 04166+2706 jet. The fields were centered on a pair of emission peaks that correspond to the same ejection event, and were observed in CO(2-1), SiO(5-4), and SO(65-54). $ Results.$ Both ALMA fields present spatial distributions that are approximately elliptical and have their minor axes aligned with the jet direction. As the velocity increases, the emission in each field moves gradually across the elliptical region. This systematic pattern indicates that the emitting gas in each field lies in a disk-like structure that is perpendicular to the jet axis and is expanding away from the jet. A small degree of curvature in the first-moment maps indicates that the disks are slightly curved in the manner expected for bow shocks moving away from the IRAS source. A simple geometrical model confirms that this scenario fits the main emission features. $Conclusions.$ The emission peaks in the IRAS 04166+2706 jet likely represent internal bow shocks where material is being ejected laterally away from the jet axis. While the linear momentum of the ejected gas is dominated by the component in the jet direction, the sideways component is not negligible, and can potentially affect the distribution of gas in the surrounding outflow and core.
  • We study the molecular abundance and spatial distribution of the simplest sugar alcohol, ethylene glycol (EG), the simplest sugar glycoladehyde (GA), and other chemically related complex organic species towards the massive star-forming region G31.41+0.31. We have analyzed multiple single dish and interferometric data, and obtained excitation temperatures and column densities using an LTE analysis. We have reported for the first time the presence of EG towards G31.41+0.31, and we have also detected multiple transitions of other complex organic molecules such as GA, methyl formate (MF), dimethyl ether (DME) and ethanol (ET). The high angular resolution images show that the EG emission is very compact, peaking towards the maximum of the continuum. These observations suggest that low abundance complex organic molecules, like EG or GA, are good probes of the gas located closer to the forming stars. Our analysis confirms that EG is more abundant than GA in G31.41+0.31, as previously observed in other interstellar regions. Comparing different star-forming regions we find evidence of an increase of the EG/GA abundance ratio with the luminosity of the source. The DME/MF and EG/ET ratios are nearly constant with luminosity. We have also found that the abundance ratios of pairs of isomers GA/MF and ET/DME decrease with the luminosity of the sources. The most likely explanation for the behavior of the EG/GA ratio is that these molecules are formed by different chemical formation routes not directly linked; although warm-up timescales effects and different formation and destruction efficiencies in the gas phase cannot be ruled out. The most likely formation route of EG is by combination of two CH$_{2}$OH radicals on dust grains. We also favor that GA is formed via the solid-phase dimerization of the formyl radical HCO, and a chemical link between MF and DME.
  • The formation process of massive stars is not well understood, and advancement in our understanding benefits from high resolution observations and modelling of the gas and dust surrounding individual high-mass (proto)stars. Here we report sub-arcsecond (<1550 au) resolution observations of the young massive star G11.92-0.61 MM1 with the SMA and VLA. Our 1.3 mm SMA observations reveal consistent velocity gradients in compact molecular line emission from species such as CH$_3$CN, CH$_3$OH, OCS, HNCO, H$_2$CO, DCN and CH$_3$CH$_2$CN, oriented perpendicular to the previously reported bipolar molecular outflow from MM1. Modelling of the compact gas kinematics suggests a structure undergoing rotation around the peak of the dust continuum emission. The rotational profile can be well fit by a model of a Keplerian disc, including infall, surrounding an enclosed mass of 30-60M$_{\odot}$, of which 2-3M$_{\odot}$ is attributed to the disc. From modelling the CH$_3$CN emission, we determine that two temperature components, of 150 K and 230 K, are required to adequately reproduce the spectra. Our 0.9 and 3.0cm VLA continuum data exhibit an excess above the level expected from dust emission; the full centimetre-submillimetre wavelength spectral energy distribution of MM1 is well reproduced by a model including dust emission, an unresolved hypercompact H{\i}{\i} region, and a compact ionised jet. In combination, our results suggest that MM1 is an example of a massive proto-O star forming via disc accretion, in a similar way to that of lower mass stars.
  • The dense, cold regions where high-mass stars form are poorly characterised, yet they represent an ideal opportunity to learn more about the initial conditions of high-mass star formation (HMSF), since high-mass starless cores (HMSCs) lack the violent feedback seen at later evolutionary stages. We present continuum maps obtained from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometry at 1.1 mm for four infrared dark clouds (IRDCs, G28.34S, IRDC 18530, IRDC 18306, and IRDC 18308). We also present 1 mm/3 mm line surveys using IRAM 30 m single-dish observations. Our results are: (1) At a spatial resolution of 10^4 AU, the 1.1 mm SMA observations resolve each source into several fragments. The mass of each fragment is on average >10 Msun, which exceeds the predicted thermal Jeans mass of the whole clump by a factor of up to 30, indicating that thermal pressure does not dominate the fragmentation process. Our measured velocity dispersions in the 30 m lines imply that non-thermal motions provides the extra support against gravity in the fragments. (2) Both non-detection of high-J transitions and the hyperfine multiplet fit of N2H+(1-0), C2H(1-0), HCN(1-0), and H13CN(1-0) indicate that our sources are cold and young. However, obvious detection of SiO and the asymmetric line profile of HCO+(1-0) in G28.34S indicate a potential protostellar object and probable infall motion. (3) With a large number of N-bearing species, the existence of carbon rings and molecular ions, and the anti-correlated spatial distributions between N2H+/NH2D and CO, our large-scale high-mass clumps exhibit similar chemical features as small-scale low-mass prestellar objects. This study of a small sample of IRDCs illustrates that thermal Jeans instability alone cannot explain the fragmentation of the clump into cold (~15 K), dense (>10^5 cm-3) cores and that these IRDCs are not completely quiescent.
  • We present observations towards a high-mass ($\rm >40\,M_{\odot}$), low luminosity ($\rm <10\,L_{\odot}$) $\rm 70\,\mu$m dark molecular core G 28.34 S-A at 3.4 mm, using the IRAM 30 m telescope and the NOEMA interferometer. We report the detection of $\rm SiO$ $J=\rm 2\rightarrow1$ line emission, which is spatially resolved in this source at a linear resolution of $\sim$0.1 pc, while the 3.4 mm continuum image does not resolve any internal sub-structures. The SiO emission exhibits two W-E oriented lobes centring on the continuum peak. Corresponding to the red-shifted and blue-shifted gas with velocities up to $\rm 40\,km\,s^{-1}$ relative to the quiescent cloud, these lobes clearly indicate the presence of a strong bipolar outflow from this $\rm 70\,\mu$m dark core, a source previously considered as one of the best candidates of "starless" core. Our SiO detection is consistent with ALMA archival data of $\rm SiO$ $J=\rm 5\rightarrow4$, whose high-velocity blue-shifted gas reveals a more compact lobe spatially closer to the dust center. This outflow indicates that the central source may be in an early evolutionary stage of forming a high-mass protostar. We also find that the low-velocity components (in the range of $\rm V_{lsr}$$\rm_{-5}^{+3}\,km\,s^{-1}$) have an extended, NW-SE oriented distribution. Discussing the possible accretion scenarios of the outflow-powering young stellar object, we argue that the molecular line emission and the molecular outflows may provide a better indication of the accretion history when forming young stellar object, than that from a snapshot observations of the present bolometric luminosity. This is particularly significant for the cases of episodic accretion, which may occur during the collapse of the parent molecular core.
  • The X-ray afterglow of GRB 130831A shows an "internal plateau" with a decay slope of $\sim$ 0.8, followed by a steep drop at around $10^5$ s with a slope of $\sim$ 6. After the drop, the X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical afterglow exhibits two segments of plateaus separated by a luminous optical flare, followed by a normal decay with a slope basically consistent with that of the late-time X-ray afterglow. The decay of the internal X-ray plateau is much steeper than what we expect in the simplest magnetar model. We propose a scenario in which the magnetar undergoes gravitational-wave-driven r-mode instability, and the spin-down is dominated by gravitational wave losses up to the end of the steep plateau, so that such a relatively steep plateau can be interpreted as the internal emission of the magnetar wind and the sharp drop can be produced when the magnetar collapses into a black hole. This scenario also predicts an initial X-ray plateau lasting for hundreds of seconds with an approximately constant flux which is compatible with observation. Assuming that the magnetar wind has a negligible contribution in the optical band, we interpret the optical afterglow as the forward shock emission by invoking the energy injection from a continuously refreshed shock following the prompt emission phase. It is shown that our model can basically describe the temporal evolution of the multi-band afterglow of GRB 130831A.
  • To search for an S= -1 di-baryonic state which decays to $\Lambda p$, the $ {\rm{}^3He}(K^-,\Lambda p)n_{missing}$ reaction was studied at 1.0 GeV/$c$. Unobserved neutrons were kinematically identified from the missing mass $M_X$ of the $ {\rm{}^3He}(K^-,\Lambda p)X$ reaction in order to have a large acceptance for the $\Lambda pn$ final state. The observed $\Lambda p n$ events, distributed widely over the kinematically allowed region of the Dalitz plot, establish that the major component comes from a three nucleon absorption process. A concentration of events at a specific neutron kinetic energy was observed in a region of low momentum transfer to the $\Lambda p$. To account for the observed peak structure, the simplest S-wave pole was assumed to exist in the reaction channel, having Breit-Wigner form in energy and with a Gaussian form-factor. A minimum $\chi^2$ method was applied to deduce its mass $M_X\ =$ 2355 $ ^{+ 6}_{ - 8}$ (stat.) $ \pm 12$ (syst.) MeV/c$^2$, and decay-width $\Gamma_X\ = $ 110 $ ^{+ 19}_{ - 17}$ (stat.) $ \pm 27$ (syst.) MeV/c$^2$, respectively. The form factor parameter $Q_X \sim$ 400 MeV/$c$ implies that the range of interaction is about 0.5
  • A novel hadron calorimeter is being developed for future lepton colliding beam detectors. The calorimeter is optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) to the measurement of hadronic jets and features a very finely segmented readout with 1 x 1 cm2 cells. The active media of the calorimeter are Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with a digital, i.e. one-bit, readout. To first order the energy of incident particles in this calorimeter is reconstructed as being proportional to the number of pads with a signal over a given threshold. A large-scale prototype calorimeter with approximately 500,000 readout channels has been built and underwent extensive testing in the Fermilab and CERN test beams. This paper reports on the design, construction, and commissioning of this prototype calorimeter.
  • A novel hadron calorimeter is being developed for future lepton colliding beam detectors. The calorimeter is optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) to the measurement of hadronic jets and features a very finely segmented readout with 1 x 1 cm2 cells. The active media of the calorimeter are Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with a digital, i.e. one-bit, readout. To first order the energy of incident particles in this calorimeter is reconstructed as being proportional to the number of pads with a signal over a given threshold. A large-scale prototype calorimeter with approximately 500,000 readout channels has been built and underwent extensive testing in the Fermilab and CERN test beams. This paper reports on the design, construction, and commissioning of the electronic readout system of this prototype calorimeter. The system is based on the DCAL front-end chip and a VME-based back-end.
  • Using spectral-line observations of HNCO, N2H+, and HNC, we investigate the kinematics of dense gas in the central ~250 pc of the Galaxy. We present SCOUSE (Semi-automated multi-COmponent Universal Spectral-line fitting Engine), a line fitting algorithm designed to analyse large volumes of spectral-line data efficiently and systematically. Unlike techniques which do not account for complex line profiles, SCOUSE accurately describes the {l, b, v_LSR} distribution of CMZ gas, which is asymmetric about Sgr A* in both position and velocity. Velocity dispersions range from 2.6 km/s<\sigma<53.1 km/s. A median dispersion of 9.8 km/s, translates to a Mach number, M_3D>28. The gas is distributed throughout several "streams", with projected lengths ~100-250 pc. We link the streams to individual clouds and sub-regions, including Sgr C, the 20 and 50 km/s clouds, the dust ridge, and Sgr B2. Shell-like emission features can be explained by the projection of independent molecular clouds in Sgr C and the newly identified conical profile of Sgr B2 in {l ,b, v_LSR} space. These features have previously invoked supernova-driven shells and cloud-cloud collisions as explanations. We instead caution against structure identification in velocity-integrated emission maps. Three geometries describing the 3-D structure of the CMZ are investigated: i) two spiral arms; ii) a closed elliptical orbit; iii) an open stream. While two spiral arms and an open stream qualitatively reproduce the gas distribution, the most recent parameterisation of the closed elliptical orbit does not. Finally, we discuss how proper motion measurements of masers can distinguish between these geometries, and suggest that this effort should be focused on the 20 km/s and 50 km/s clouds and Sgr C.
  • We present observations of the 1.3 mm continuum emission toward hub-N and hub-S of the infrared dark cloud G14.225-0.506 carried out with the Submillimeter Array, together with observations of the dust emission at 870 and 350 microns obtained with APEX and CSO telescopes. The large scale dust emission of both hubs consists of a single peaked clump elongated in the direction of the associated filament. At small scales, the SMA images reveal that both hubs fragment into several dust condensations. The fragmentation level was assessed under the same conditions and we found that hub-N presents 4 fragments while hub-S is more fragmented, with 13 fragments identified. We studied the density structure by means of a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profile at 870 and 350 microns and the spectral energy distribution adopting a Plummer-like function to describe the density structure. The parameters inferred from the model are remarkably similar in both hubs, suggesting that density structure could not be responsible in determining the fragmentation level. We estimated several physical parameters such as the level of turbulence and the magnetic field strength, and we found no significant differences between these hubs. The Jeans analysis indicates that the observed fragmentation is more consistent with thermal Jeans fragmentation compared with a scenario that turbulent support is included. The lower fragmentation level observed in hub-N could be explained in terms of stronger UV radiation effects from a nearby HII region, evolutionary effects, and/or stronger magnetic fields at small scales, a scenario that should be further investigated.
  • We study the optical properties associated to both the polariton gap and the Bragg gap in periodic resonator-waveguide coupled system, based on the temporal coupled mode theory and the transfer matrix method. By the complex band and the transmission spectrum, it is feasible to tune the interaction between multiple Bragg scattering and the local resonance, which may give rise to analogous phenomena of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We further design a plasmonic slot waveguide side-coupled with local plasmonic resonator to demonstrate the EIT-like effects in the near-infared band. Numerical calculations show that realistic amount of metal Joule loss may destroy the interference and the total absorption is enhanced in the transparency windwo due to the near zero group velocity of the guiding wave.