• In this paper, we propose a partition-masked Convolution Neural Network (CNN) to achieve compressed-video enhancement for the state-of-the-art coding standard, High Efficiency Video Coding (HECV). More precisely, our method utilizes the partition information produced by the encoder to guide the quality enhancement process. In contrast to existing CNN-based approaches, which only take the decoded frame as the input to the CNN, the proposed approach considers the coding unit (CU) size information and combines it with the distorted decoded frame such that the degradation introduced by HEVC is reduced more efficiently. Experimental results show that our approach leads to over 9.76% BD-rate saving on benchmark sequences, which achieves the state-of-the-art performance.
  • Magnetohydrodynamics of the solar corona is simulated numerically. The simulation is initialized with an extrapolated non-force-free magnetic field using the vector magnetogram of the active region (AR) NOAA 12192 obtained on the solar photosphere. Particularly, we focus on the magnetic reconnections occurring close to a magnetic null-point that resulted in appearance of circular chromospheric flare ribbons on October 24, 2014 around 21:21 UT, after peak of an X3.1 flare. The extrapolated field lines show the presence of the three-dimensional (3D) null near one of the polarity inversion lines---where the flare was observed. In the subsequent numerical simulation, we find magnetic reconnections occurring near the null point, where the magnetic field lines from the fan-plane of the 3D null form a X-type configuration with underlying arcade field lines. The footpoints of the dome-shaped field lines, inherent to the 3D null, show high gradients of the squashing factor. We find slipping reconnections at these quasi-separatrix layers, which are co-located with the post-flare circular brightening observed at the chromospheric heights. This demonstrates the viability of the initial non-force-free field along with the dynamics it initiates. Moreover, the initial field and its simulated evolution is found to be devoid of any flux rope, which is in congruence with the confined nature of the flare.
  • Magnetic reconnections (MRs) for various magnetic field line (MFL) topologies are believed to be the initiators of various solar eruptive events like flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Consequently, important is a thorough understanding and quantification of the MFL topology and their evolution which leads to MRs. Contemporary standard is to extrapolate the coronal MFLs using equilibrium models where the Lorentz force on the coronal plasma is zero everywhere, because either there is no current or the current is parallel to the magnetic field. In tandem, a non-force-free-field (NFFF) extrapolation scheme has evolved and allows for a Lorentz force which is non-zero only at the photosphere but asymptotically vanishes with height. The paper reports magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)- simulations initiated by NFFF extrapolation of the coronal MFLs for the active region NOAA 11158. Interestingly, quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) which facilitate MRs are detected in the extrapolated MFLs. The AR 11158 is flare producing and, the paper makes an attempt to asses the role of QSLs in the flare onsets.
  • Magnetic flux rope (MFR) is the core structure of the greatest eruptions, i.e., the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the Sun, and magnetic clouds are post-eruption MFRs in interplanetary space. There is a strong debate about whether or not a MFR exists prior to a CME and how the MFR forms/grows through magnetic reconnection during the eruption. Here we report a rare event, in which a magnetic cloud was observed sequentially by four spacecraft near Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars, respectively. With the aids of a uniform-twist flux rope model and a newly developed method that can recover a shock-compressed structure, we find that the axial magnetic flux and helicity of the magnetic cloud decreased when it propagated outward but the twist increased. Our analysis suggests that the `pancaking' effect and `erosion' effect may jointly cause such variations. The significance of the `pancaking' effect is difficult to be estimated, but the signature of the erosion can be found as the imbalance of the azimuthal flux of the cloud. The latter implies that the magnetic cloud was eroded significantly leaving its inner core exposed to the solar wind at far distance. The increase of the twist together with the presence of the erosion effect suggests that the post-eruption MFR may have a high-twist core enveloped by a less-twisted outer shell. These results pose a great challenge to the current understanding on the solar eruptions as well as the formation and instability of MFRs.
  • Three-dimensional magnetic topology of solar flare plays a crucial role in understanding its explosive release of magnetic energy in the corona. However, such three-dimensional coronal magnetic field is still elusive in direct observation. Here we realistically simulate the magnetic evolution during the eruptive process of a great flare, using a numerical magnetohydrodynamic model constrained by observed solar vector magnetogram. The numerical results reveal that the pre-flare corona contains multi-set twisted magnetic flux, which forms a coherent rope during the eruption. The rising flux rope is wrapped by a quasi-separatrix layer, which intersects itself below the rope, forming a hyperbolic flux tube and magnetic reconnection is triggered there. By tracing the footprint of the newly-reconnected field lines, we reproduce both the spatial location and its temporal evolution of flare ribbons with an expected accuracy in comparison of observed images. This scenario strongly confirms the three-dimensional version of standard flare model.
  • We present unique {and additional} observational evidence for the self-generation of small-scale coherent magnetic flux rope structures in the solar wind. Such structures with durations between 9 and 361 minutes are identified from Wind in-situ spacecraft measurements through the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction approach. The event occurrence counts are on the order of 3,500 per year on average and have a clear solar cycle dependence. We build a database of small-scale magnetic flux ropes from twenty-year worth of Wind spacecraft data. We show a power-law distribution of the wall-to-wall time corresponding well to the inertial range turbulence, which agrees with relevant observations and numerical simulation results. We also provide the axial current density distribution from the GS-based observational analysis, which yields a non-Gaussian probability density function consistent with numerical simulation results.
  • As a fundamental magnetic structure in the solar corona, electric current sheets (CSs) can form either prior to or during solar flare, and they are essential for magnetic energy dissipation in the solar corona by enabling magnetic reconnection. However static reconstruction of CS is rare, possibly due to limitation inherent in available coronal field extrapolation codes. Here we present the reconstruction of a large-scale pre-flare CS in solar active region 11967 using an MHD-relaxation model constrained by SDO/HMI vector magnetogram. The CS is found to be associated with a set of peculiar homologous flares that exhibit unique X-shaped ribbons and loops occurring in a quadrupolar magnetic configuration. This is evidenced by that the field lines traced from the CS to the photosphere form an X shape which nearly precisely reproduces the shape of the observed flare ribbons, suggesting that the flare is a product of the dissipation of the CS through reconnection. The CS forms in a hyperbolic flux tube, which is an intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers. The recurrence of the X-shaped flares might be attributed to the repetitive formation and dissipation of the CS, as driven by the photospheric footpoint motions. These results demonstrate the power of data-constrained MHD model in reproducing CS in the corona as well as providing insight into the magnetic mechanism of solar flares.
  • This article completes and extends a recent study of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction in toroidal geometry, as applied to a two and a half dimensional configurations in space plasmas with rotational symmetry. A further application to the benchmark study of an analytic solution to the toroidal GS equation with added noise shows deviations in the reconstructed geometry of the flux rope configuration, characterized by the orientation of the rotation axis, the major radius, and the impact parameter. On the other hand, the physical properties of the flux rope, including the axial field strength, and the toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux, agree between the numerical and exact GS solutions. We also present a real event study of a magnetic cloud flux rope from \textit{in situ} spacecraft measurements. The devised procedures for toroidal GS reconstruction are successfully executed. Various geometrical and physical parameters are obtained with associated uncertainty estimates. The overall configuration of the flux rope from the GS reconstruction is compared with the corresponding morphological reconstruction based on white-light images. The results show overall consistency, but also discrepancy in that the inclination angle of the flux rope central axis with respect to the ecliptic plane differs by about 20-30 degrees in the plane of the sky. We also compare the results with the original straight-cylinder GS reconstruction and discuss our findings.
  • We calculate the centrality dependence of inclusive cross section of large-pT charmed-meson ($D^{0}$, $D^{*}$, $D^{*+}$, and $D_{s}^{+}$) from heavy quark fragmentation by the hard photoproduction processes for the nucleus-nucleus collisions in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The numerical results indicate that the modification of the hard photoproduction processes cannot be negligible for the charmed-meson production in Au-Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Pb-Pb collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC).
  • We develop an approach of Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction for toroidal structures in space plasmas, based on in-situ spacecraft measurements. The underlying theory is the GS equation that describes two-dimensional magnetohydrostatic equilibrium as widely applied in fusion plasmas. The geometry is such that the arbitrary cross section of the torus has rotational symmetry about the rotation axis $Z$, with a major radius $r_0$. The magnetic field configuration is thus determined by a scalar flux function $\Psi$ and a functional $F$ that is a single-variable function of $\Psi$. The algorithm is implemented through a two-step approach: i) a trial-and-error process by minimizing the residue of the functional $F(\Psi)$ to determine an optimal $Z$ axis orientation, and ii) for the chosen $Z$, a $\chi^2$ minimization process resulting in the range of $r_0$. Benchmark studies of known analytic solutions to the toroidal GS equation with noise additions are presented to illustrate the two-step procedures and to demonstrate the performance of the numerical GS solver, separately. For the cases presented, the errors in $Z$ and $r_0$ are 9$^\circ$ and 22\%, respectively, and the relative percent error in the numerical GS solutions is less than 10\%. We also make public the computer codes for these implementations and benchmark studies.
  • Magnetic field extrapolation is an important tool to study the three-dimensional (3D) solar coronal magnetic field which is difficult to directly measure. Various analytic models and numerical codes exist but their results often drastically differ. Thus a critical comparison of the modeled magnetic field lines with the observed coronal loops is strongly required to establish the credibility of the model. Here we compare two different non-potential extrapolation codes, a non-linear force-free field code (CESE-MHD-NLFFF) and a non-force-free field (NFFF) code in modeling a solar active region (AR) that has a sigmoidal configuration just before a major flare erupted from the region. A 2D coronal-loop tracing and fitting method is employed to study the 3D misalignment angles between the extrapolated magnetic field lines and the EUV loops as imaged by SDO/AIA. It is found that the CESE-MHD-NLFFF code with preprocessed magnetogram performs the best, outputting a field which matches the coronal loops in the AR core imaged in AIA 94 {\AA} with a misalignment angle of ~10 degree. This suggests that the CESE-MHD-NLFFF code, even without using the information of coronal loops in constraining the magnetic field, performs as good as some coronal-loop forward-fitting models. For the loops as imaged by AIA 171 {\AA} in the outskirts of the AR, all the codes including the potential-field give comparable results of mean misalignment angle (~30 degree). Thus further improvement of the codes is needed for a better reconstruction of the long loops enveloping the core region.
  • With SDO observations and a data-constrained MHD model, we identify a confined multi-ribbon flare occurred on 2010 October 25 in solar active region 11117 as a magnetic bald patch (BP) flare with strong evidences. From the photospheric magnetic field observed by SDO/HMI, we find there is indeed magnetic BPs on the PILs which match parts of the flare ribbons. From the 3D coronal magnetic field derived from a MHD relaxation model constrained by the vector magnetograms, we find strikingly good agreement of the BP separatrix surface (BPSS) footpoints with the flare ribbons, and the BPSS itself with the hot flaring loop system. Moreover, the triggering of the BP flare can be attributed to a small flux emergence under the lobe of the BPSS, and the relevant change of the coronal magnetic field through the flare is well reproduced by the pre-flare and post-flare MHD solutions, which match the corresponding pre and post-flare AIA observations, respectively. Our work contributes to the study of non-typical flares that constitute the majority of solar flares but cannot be explained by the standard flare model.
  • Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are one kind of fundamental structures in the solar physics, and involved in various eruption phenomena. Twist, characterizing how the magnetic field lines wind around a main axis, is an intrinsic property of MFRs, closely related to the magnetic free energy and stableness. So far it is unclear how much amount of twist is carried by MFRs in the solar atmosphere and in heliosphere and what role the twist played in the eruptions of MFRs. Contrasting to the solar MFRs, there are lots of in-situ measurements of magnetic clouds (MCs), the large-scale MFRs in interplanetary space, providing some important information of the twist of MFRs. Thus, starting from MCs, we investigate the twist of interplanetary MFRs with the aid of a velocity-modified uniform-twist force-free flux rope model. It is found that most of MCs can be roughly fitted by the model and nearly half of them can be fitted fairly well though the derived twist is probably over-estimated by a factor of 2.5. By applying the model to 115 MCs observed at 1 AU, we find that (1) the twist angles of interplanetary MFRs generally follow a trend of about $0.6\frac{l}{R}$ radians, where $\frac{l}{R}$ is the aspect ratio of a MFR, with a cutoff at about $12\pi$ radians AU$^{-1}$, (2) most of them are significantly larger than $2.5\pi$ radians but well bounded by $2\frac{l}{R}$ radians, (3) strongly twisted magnetic field lines probably limit the expansion and size of MFRs, and (4) the magnetic field lines in the legs wind more tightly than those in the leading part of MFRs. These results not only advance our understanding of the properties and behavior of interplanetary MFRs, but also shed light on the formation and eruption of MFRs in the solar atmosphere. A discussion about the twist and stableness of solar MFRs are therefore given.
  • The largest geomagnetic storm so far in the solar cycle 24 was produced by a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) originating on 2015 March 15. It was an initially west-oriented CME and expected to only cause a weak geomagnetic disturbance. Why did this CME finally cause such a large geomagnetic storm? We try to find some clues by investigating its propagation from the Sun to 1 AU. First, we reconstruct the CME's kinematic properties in the corona from the SOHO and SDO imaging data with the aid of the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model. It is suggested that the CME propagated to the west $\sim$$33^\circ$$\pm$$10^\circ$ away from the Sun-Earth line with a speed of about 817 km s$^{-1}$ before leaving the field of view of the SOHO/LASCO C3 camera. A magnetic cloud (MC) corresponding to this CME was measured in-situ by the Wind spacecraft two days later. By applying two MC reconstruction methods, we infer the configuration of the MC as well as some kinematic information, which implies that the CME possibly experienced an eastward deflection on its way to 1 AU. However, due to the lack of observations from the STEREO spacecraft, the CME's kinematic evolution in interplanetary space is not clear. In order to fill this gap, we utilize numerical MHD simulation, drag-based CME propagation model (DBM) and the model for CME deflection in interplanetary space (DIPS) to recover the propagation process, especially the trajectory, of the CME from $30 R_S$ to 1 AU. It is suggested that the trajectory of the CME was deflected toward the Earth by about $12^\circ$, consistent with the implication from the MC reconstruction at 1 AU. This eastward deflection probably contributed to the CME's unexpected geoeffectiveness by pushing the center of the initially west-oriented CME closer to the Earth.
  • We study the physical mechanism of a major X-class solar flare that occurred in the super NOAA active region (AR) 12192 using a data-driven numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling complemented with observations. With the evolving magnetic fields observed at the solar surface as bottom boundary input, we drive an MHD system to evolve self-consistently in correspondence with the realistic coronal evolution. During a two-day time interval, the modeled coronal field has been slowly stressed by the photospheric field evolution,which gradually created a large-scale coronal current sheet, i.e., a narrow layer with intense current, in the core of the AR. The current layer was successively enhanced until it became so thin that a tether-cutting reconnection between the sheared magnetic arcades was set in, which led to a flare. The modeled reconnecting field lines and their footpoints match well the observed hot flaring loops and the flare ribbons, respectively, suggesting that the model has successfully "reproduced" the macroscopic magnetic process of the flare. In particular, with simulation, we explained why this event is a confined eruption-the consequent of the reconnection is the shared arcade instead of a newly formed flux rope. We also found much weaker magnetic implosion effect comparing to many other X-class flares
  • Magnetic clouds (MCs) are the interplanetary counterpart of coronal magnetic flux ropes. They can provide valuable information to reveal the flux rope characteristics at their eruption stage in the corona, which are unable to be explored in situ at present. In this paper, we make a comprehensive survey of the average iron charge state (<Q>Fe) distributions inside 96 MCs for solar cycle 23 using ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) data. As the <Q>Fe in the solar wind are typically around 9+ to 11+, the Fe charge state is defined as high when the <Q>Fe is larger than 12+, which implies the existence of a considerable amount of Fe ions with high charge states (e.g., \geq 16+). The statistical results show that the <Q>Fe distributions of 92 (~ 96%) MCs can be classified into four groups with different characteristics. In group A (11 MCs), the <Q>Fe shows a bimodal distribution with both peaks higher than 12+. Group B (4 MCs) presents a unimodal distribution of <Q>Fe with its peak higher than 12+. In groups C (29 MCs) and D (48 MCs), the <Q>Fe remains higher and lower than 12+ throughout ACE passage through the MC, respectively. Possible explanations to these distributions are discussed.
  • Solar active region (AR) 11283 is a very magnetically complex region and it has produced many eruptions. However, there exists a non-eruptive filament in the plage region just next to an eruptive one in the AR, which gives us an opportunity to perform a comparison analysis of these two filaments. The coronal magnetic field extrapolated using a CESE-MHD-NLFFF code (Jiang & Feng 2013) reveals that two magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) exist in the same extrapolation box supporting these two filaments, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic field shows that the eruptive MFR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) co-spatial very well with a pre-eruptive EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for coronal sigmoids. The magnetic dips of the non-eruptive MFRs match H{\alpha} observation of the non-eruptive filament strikingly well, which strongly supports the MFR-dip model for filaments. Compared with the non-eruptive MFR/filament (with a length of about 200 Mm), the eruptive MFR/filament is much smaller (with a length of about 20 Mm), but it contains most of the magnetic free energy in the extrapolation box and holds a much higher free energy density than the non-eruptive one. Both the MFRs are weakly twisted and cannot trigger kink instability. The AR eruptive MFR is unstable because its axis reaches above a critical height for torus instability, at which the overlying closed arcades can no longer confine the MFR stably. On the contrary, the quiescent MFR is very firmly held by its overlying field, as its axis apex is far below the torus-instability threshold height. Overall, this comparison investigation supports that MFR can exist prior to eruption and the ideal MHD instability can trigger MFR eruption.
  • Hot channels (HCs), high temperature erupting structures in the lower corona of the Sun, have been proposed as a proxy of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) since their initial discovery. However, it is difficult to make definitive proof given the fact that there is no direct measurement of magnetic field in the corona. An alternative way is to use the magnetic field measurement in the solar wind from in-situ instruments. On 2012 July 12, an HC was observed prior to and during a coronal mass ejection (CME) by the AIA high-temperature images. The HC is invisible in the EUVI low-temperature images, which only show the cooler leading front (LF). However, both the LF and an ejecta can be observed in the coronagraphic images. These are consistent with the high temperature and high density of the HC and support that the ejecta is the erupted HC. In the meanwhile, the associated CME shock was identified ahead of the ejecta and the sheath through the COR2 images, and the corresponding ICME was detected by \textit{ACE}, showing the shock, sheath and magnetic cloud (MC) sequentially, which agrees with the coronagraphic observations. Further, the MC contained a low-ionization-state center and a high-ionization-state shell, consistent with the pre-existing HC observation and its growth through magnetic reconnection. All of these observations support that the MC detected near the Earth is the counterpart of the erupted HC in the corona for this event. Therefore, our study provides strong observational evidence of the HC as an MFR.
  • Heterogeneous cloud radio access networks (HCRANs) are potential solutions to improve both spectral and energy efficiencies by embedding cloud computing into heterogeneous networks (HetNets). The interference among remote radio heads (RRHs) can be suppressed with centralized cooperative processing in the base band unit (BBU) pool, while the intertier interference between RRHs and macro base stations (MBSs) is still challenging in H-CRANs. In this paper, to mitigate this inter-tier interference, a contract-based interference coordination framework is proposed, where three scheduling schemes are involved, and the downlink transmission interval is divided into three phases accordingly. The core idea of the proposed framework is that the BBU pool covering all RRHs is selected as the principal that would offer a contract to the MBS, and the MBS as the agent decides whether to accept the contract or not according to an individual rational constraint. An optimal contract design that maximizes the rate-based utility is derived when perfect channel state information (CSI) is acquired at both principal and agent. Furthermore, contract optimization under the situation where only the partial CSI can be obtained from practical channel estimation is addressed as well. Monte Carlo simulations are provided to confirm the analysis, and simulation results show that the proposed framework can significantly increase the transmission data rates over baselines, thus demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed contract-based solution.
  • We report on the detailed and systematic study of field-line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model to reveal the close relation between the field-line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in-situ Wind spacecraft measurements. We show that the field-line twist distributions within interplanetary flux ropes are inconsistent with the Lundquist model. In particular we utilize the unique measurements of magnetic field-line lengths within selected ICME events as provided by Kahler et al. (2011) based on energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU and the associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft. These direct measurements are compared with our model calculations to help assess the flux-rope interpretation of the embedded magnetic structures. By using the different flux-rope models, we show that the in-situ direct measurements of field-line lengths are consistent with a flux-rope structure with spiral field lines of constant and low twist, largely different from that of the Lundquist model, especially for relatively large-scale flux ropes.
  • User cooperation based multi-hop wireless communication networks (MH-WCNs) as the key communication technological component of mobile social networks (MSNs) should be exploited to enhance the capability of accumulating data rates and extending coverage flexibly. As one of the most promising and efficient user cooperation techniques, network coding can increase the potential cooperation performance gains among selfishly driven users in MSNs. To take full advantages of network coding in MH-WCNs, a network coding transmission strategy and its corresponding channel estimation technique are studied in this paper. Particularly, a $4-$hop network coding transmission strategy is presented first, followed by an extension strategy for the arbitrary $2N-$hop scenario ($N\geq 2$). The linear minimum mean square error (LMMSE) and maximum-likelihood (ML) channel estimation methods are designed to improve the transmission quality in MH-WCNs. Closed form expressions in terms of the mean squared error (MSE) for the LMMSE channel estimation method are derived, which allows the design of the optimal training sequence. Unlike the LMMSE method, it is difficult to obtain closed-form MSE expressions for the nonlinear ML channel estimation method. In order to accomplish optimal training sequence design for the ML method, the Cram\'{e}r-Rao lower bound (CRLB) is employed. Numerical results are provided to corroborate the proposed analysis, and the results demonstrate that the analysis is accurate and the proposed methods are effective.
  • Hydromagnetic waves, especially those of frequencies in the range of a few milli-Hz to a few Hz observed in the Earth's magnetosphere, are categorized as Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves or pulsations. They have been extensively studied due to their importance in the interaction with radiation belt particles and in probing the structures of the magnetosphere. We developed an approach in examining the toroidal standing Aflv\'{e}n waves in a background magnetic field by recasting the wave equation into a Klein-Gordon (KG) form along individual field lines. The eigenvalue solutions to the system are characteristic of a propagation type when the corresponding eigen-frequency is greater than a cut-off frequency and an evanescent type otherwise. We apply the approach to a compressed dipole magnetic field model of the inner magnetosphere, and obtain the spatial profiles of relevant parameters and the spatial wave forms of harmonic oscillations. We further extend the approach to poloidal mode standing Alfv\'{e}n waves along field lines. In particular, we present a quantitative comparison with a recent spacecraft observation of a poloidal standing Alfv\'{e}n wave in the Earth's magnetosphere. Our analysis based on KG equation yields consistent results which agree with the spacecraft measurements of the wave period and the amplitude ratio between the magnetic field and electric field perturbations. We also present computational results of eigenvalue solutions to the compressional poloidal mode waves in the compressed dipole magnetic field geometry.
  • Magnetic reconnection is essential to release the flux rope during its ejection. The question remains: how does the magnetic reconnection change the flux rope structure? Following the original study of \citet{Qiu2007}, we compare properties of ICME/MC flux ropes measured at 1 AU and properties of associated solar progenitors including flares, filaments, and CMEs. In particular, the magnetic field-line twist distribution within interplanetary magnetic flux ropes is systematically derived and examined. Our analysis shows that for most of these events, the amount of twisted flux per AU in MCs is comparable with the total reconnection flux on the Sun, and the sign of the MC helicity is consistent with the sign of helicity of the solar source region judged from the geometry of post-flare loops. Remarkably, we find that about one half of the 18 magnetic flux ropes, most of them being associated with erupting filaments, have a nearly uniform and relatively low twist distribution from the axis to the edge, and the majority of the other flux ropes exhibit very high twist near the axis, of up to $\gtrsim 5$ turns per AU, which decreases toward the edge. The flux ropes are therefore not linear force free. We also conduct detailed case studies showing the contrast of two events with distinct twist distribution in MCs as well as different flare and dimming characteristics in solar source regions, and discuss how reconnection geometry reflected in flare morphology may be related to the structure of the flux rope formed on the Sun.
  • Solar filament are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, from the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is the first in that current NLFFF extrapolations with presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion line (PIL) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of a FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength $\lesssim 100$ G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both side of the PIL and the transverse field has a low value of signal-to-noise ratio. Thus it represents a far more difficult challenge to extrapolate a large-scale FR in such case. We demonstrate that our CESE--MHD--NLFFF code is competent for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which supports strongly the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.
  • In this paper we discuss conservation laws in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and gas dynamics associated with advected invariants. The invariants in some cases, can be related to fluid relabelling symmetries associated with the Lagrangian map. There are different classes of invariants that are advected or Lie dragged with the flow. Simple examples are the advection of the entropy S (a 0-form), and the conservation of magnetic flux (an invariant 2-form advected with the flow). The magnetic flux conservation law is equivalent to Faraday's equation. We discuss the gauge condition required for the magnetic helicity to be advected with the flow. The conditions for the cross helicity to be an invariant are discussed. We discuss the different variants of helicity in fluid dynamics and in MHD, including: fluid helicity, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. The fluid helicity conservation law and the cross helcity conservation law in MHD are derived for the case of a barotropic gas. If the magnetic field lies in the constant entropy surface, then the gas pressure can depend on both the entropy and the density. In these cases the conservation laws are local conservation laws. We obtain nonlocal conservation laws for fluid helicity and cross helicity for non-barotropic fluids using the Clebsch variable formulation of gas dynamics and MHD. Ertel's theorem and potential vorticity, the Hollman invariant, and the Godbillon Vey invariant for special flows for which the magnetic helicity is zero are also discussed.