• Recent experiments show strong evidences of nematic triplet superconductivity in doped Bi$_2$Se$_3$ and in Bi$_2$Te$_3$ thin film on a superconducting substrate, but with varying identifications of the direction of the $d$-vector of the triplet that is essential to the topology of the underlying superconductivity. Here we show that the $d$-vector can be directly visualized by scanning tunneling measurements: At subgap energies the $d$-vector is along the leading peak wave-vector in the quasi-particle-interference pattern for potential impurities, and counter-intuitively along the elongation of the local density-of-state profile of the vortex. The results provide a useful guide to experiments, the result of which would in turn pose a stringent constraint on the pairing symmetry.
  • The electronic nematic phase is characterized as an ordered state of matter with rotational symmetry breaking, and has been well studied in the quantum Hall system and the high-$T_c$ superconductors, regardless of cuprate or pnictide family. The nematic state in high-$T_c$ systems often relates to the structural transition or electronic instability in the normal phase. Nevertheless, the electronic states below the superconducting transition temperature is still an open question. With high-resolution scanning tunneling microscope measurements, direct observation of vortex core in FeSe thin films revealed the nematic superconducting state by Song \emph{et al}. Here, motivated by the experiment, we construct the extended Ginzburg-Landau free energy to describe the elliptical vortex, where a mixed \emph{s}-wave and \emph{d}-wave superconducting order is coupled to the nematic order. The nematic order induces the mixture of two superconducting orders and enhances the anisotropic interaction between the two superconducting orders, resulting in a symmetry breaking from $C_4$ to $C_2$. Consequently, the vortex cores are stretched into an elliptical shape. In the equilibrium state, the elliptical vortices assemble a lozenge-like vortex lattice, being well consistent with experimental results.
  • We have investigated the in-gap bound states (IGBS) induced by a single nonmagnetic impurity in multiband superconductors with incipient bands. Contrary to the naive expectation, we found that even if the superconducting (SC) order parameter is sign-preserving s-wave on the Fermi surfaces, the incipient bands may still affect the appearance and locations of the IGBS, although the gap between the incipient bands and the Fermi level is much larger than the SC gap. Therefore in scanning tunneling microscopy experiments, the IGBS induced by a single nonmagnetic impurity are not the definitive evidences for the sign-changing order parameter on the Fermi surfaces. Our findings have special implications for the experimental determination of the pairing symmetry in the FeSe-based superconductors.
  • We apply the recent wavepacket formalism developed by Ossadnik to describe the origin of the short range ordered pseudogap state as the hole doping is lowered through a critical density in cuprates. We argue that the energy gain that drives this precursor state to Mott localization, follows from maximizing umklapp scattering near the Fermi energy. To this end we show how energy gaps driven by umklapp scattering can open on an appropriately chosen surface, as proposed earlier by Yang, Rice and Zhang. The key feature is that the pairing instability includes umklapp scattering, leading to an energy gap not only in the single particle spectrum but also in the pair spectrum. As a result the superconducting gap at overdoping is turned into an insulating pseudogap, in the antinodal parts of the Fermi surface.
  • Based on recent high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurement in monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO$_{3}$, we constructed a tight-binding model and proposed a superconducting (SC) pairing function which can well fit the observed band structure and SC gap anisotropy. Then we investigated the spin excitation spectra in order to determine the possible sign structure of the SC order parameter. We found that a resonance-like spin excitation may occur if the SC order parameter changes sign along the Fermi surfaces. However, this resonance is located at different locations in momentum space compared to other FeSe-based superconductors, suggesting that the Fermi surface shape and pairing symmetry in monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO$_{3}$ may be different from other FeSe-based superconductors.
  • The pairing symmetry of the newly proposed cobalt high temperature (high-$T_c$) superconductors formed by vertex shared cation-anion tetrahedral complexes is studied by the methods of mean field, random phase approximation (RPA) and functional renormalization group (FRG) analysis. The results of all these methods show that the $d_{x^2-y^2}$ pairing symmetry is robustly favored near half filling. The RPA and FRG methods, which are valid in weak interaction regions, predict that the superconducting state is also strongly orbital selective, namely the $d_{x^2-y^2}$ orbital that has the largest density near half filling among the three $t_{2g}$ orbitals dominates superconducting pairing. These results suggest that the new materials, if synthesized, can provide indisputable test to high-$T_c$ pairing mechanism and the validity of different theoretical methods.
  • We constructed an effective tight-binding model with five Cr $3d$ orbitals for LaOCrAs according to first-principles calculations. Basing on this model, we investigated possible superconductivity induced by correlations in doped LaOCrAs using the functional renormalization group (FRG). We find that there are two domes of superconductivity in electron-doped LaOCrAs. With increasing electron doping, the ground state of the system evolves from G-type antiferromagnetism in the parent compound to an incipient $s_\pm$-wave superconducting phase dominated by electron bands derived from the $d_{3z^2-r^2}$ orbital as the filling is above $4.2$ electrons per site on the $d$-orbitals of Cr. The gap function has strong octet anisotropy on the Fermi pocket around the zone center and diminishes on the other pockets. In electron over-doped LaOCrAs, the system develops $d_{x^2-y^2}$-wave superconducting phase and the active band derives from the $d_{xy}$ orbital. Inbetween the two superconducting domes, a time-reversal symmetry breaking $s+id$ SC phase is likely to occur. We also find $s_\pm$-wave superconducting phase in the hole-doped case.
  • We propose to utilize the sub-system fidelity (SSF), defined by comparing a pair of reduced density matrices derived from the degenerate ground states, to identify and/or characterize symmetry protected topological (SPT) states in one-dimensional interacting many-body systems. The SSF tells whether two states are locally indistinguishable (LI) by measurements within a given sub-system. Starting from two polar states (states that could be distinguished on either edge), the other combinations of these states can be mapped onto a Bloch sphere. We prove that a pair of orthogonal states on the equator of the Bloch sphere are LI, independently of whether they are SPT states or cat states (symmetry-preserving states by linear combinations of states that break discrete symmetries). Armed with this theorem, we provide a scheme to construct zero-energy exitations that swap the LI states. We show that the zero mode can be located anywhere for cat states, but is localized near the edge for SPT states. We also show that the SPT states are LI in a finite fraction of the bulk (excluding the two edges), whereas the symmetry-breaking states are distinguishable. This can be used to pinpoint the transition from SPT states to the symmetry-breaking states.
  • Combining the recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements, we construct a tight-binding model suitable for describing the band structure of monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO$_{3}$. Then we propose a possible pairing function, which can well describe the gap anisotropy observed by ARPES and has a hidden sign-changing characteristic. At last, as a test of this pairing function we further study the nonmagnetic impurity-induced bound states, to be verified by future STM experiments.
  • Majorana modes and fractional fermions are two types of edge zero modes appearing separately in topological superconductors and dimerized chains. Here we reveal how to harvest both types of edge modes simultaneously in an exotic chain. Such modes are naturally spin-charge separated, and are protected by the inversion and spin-parity symmetries. We construct a lattice model to illustrate the nature of these edge modes, utilizing fermionic functional renormalization group, mean-field theory and bosonization. We also elucidate that the four-fold degenerate ground states with edge-spinons in the Haldane phase of spin-$1$ chain may be reinterpreted as our spin-charge separated edge modes in an equivalent spin-$1/2$ fermionic model.
  • We investigate the electronic instabilities in a Kagome lattice with Rashba spin-orbital coupling by the unbiased singular-mode functional renormalization group. At the parent $1/3$-filling, the normal state is a quantum spin Hall system. Since the bottom of the conduction band is near the van Hove singularity, the electron-doped system is highly susceptible to competing orders upon electron interactions. The topological nature of the parent system enriches the complexity and novelty of such orders. We find $120^o$-type intra-unitcell antiferromagnetic order, $f$-wave superconductivity and chiral $p$-wave superconductivity with increasing electron doping above the van Hove point. In both types of superconducting phases, there is a mixture of comparable spin singlet and triplet components because of the Rashba coupling. The chiral $p$-wave superconducting state is characterized by a Chern number $Z=1$, supporting a branch of Weyl fermion states on each edge. The model bares close relevance to the so-called $sd^2$-graphenes proposed recently.
  • Motivated by the recent discovery of high temperature antiferromagnet SrRu$_2$O$_6$ and its potential to be the parent of a new superconductor, we construct a minimal $t_{2g}$-orbital model on a honeycomb lattice to simulate its low energy band structure. Local Coulomb interaction is taken into account through both random phase approximation and mean field theory. Experimentally observed Antiferromagnetic order is obtained in both approximations. In addition, our theory predicts that the magnetic moments on three $t_{2g}$-orbitals are non-collinear as a result of the strong spin-orbit coupling of Ru atoms.
  • Based on the possible superconducting (SC) pairing symmetries recently proposed, the quasiparticle interference (QPI) patterns in electron- and hole-doped Sr$_{2}$IrO$_{4}$ are theoretically investigated. In the electron-doped case, the QPI spectra can be explained based on a model similar to the octet model of the cuprates while in the hole-doped case, both the Fermi surface topology and the sign of the SC order parameter resemble those of the iron pnictides and there exists a QPI vector resulting from the interpocket scattering between the electron and hole pockets. In both cases, the evolution of the QPI vectors with energy and their behaviors in the nonmagnetic and magnetic impurity scattering cases can well be explained based on the evolution of the constant-energy contours and the sign structure of the SC order parameter. The QPI spectra presented in this paper can be compared with future scanning tunneling microscopy experiments to test whether there are SC phases in electron- and hole-doped Sr$_{2}$IrO$_{4}$ and what the pairing symmetry is.
  • Looking for superconductors with higher transition temperature requires a guiding principle. In conventional superconductors, electrons pair up into Cooper pairs via the retarded attraction mediated by electron-phonon coupling. Higher-frequency phonon (or smaller atomic mass) leads to higher superconducting transition temperature, known as the isotope effect. Furthermore, superconductivity is the only instability channel of the metallic normal state. In correlated systems, the above simple scenario could be easily violated. The strong local interaction is poorly screened, and this conspires with a featured Fermi surface to promote various competing electronic orders, such as spin-density-wave, charge-density-wave and unconventional superconductivity. On top of the various phases, the effect of electron-phonon coupling is an intriguing issue. Using the functional renormalization group, here we investigated the interplay between the electron correlation and electron-phonon coupling in a prototype Hubbard-Holstein model on a square lattice. At half-filling, we found spin-density-wave and charge-density-wave phases and the transition between them, while no superconducting phase arises. Upon finite doping, d-wave/s-wave superconductivity emerges in proximity to spin-density-wave/charge-density-wave phases. Surprisingly, lower-frequency Holstein-phonons are either less destructive, or even beneficial, to the various phases, resulting in a negative isotope effect. We discuss the underlying mechanism behind and the implications of such anomalous effects.
  • We constructed tight-binding models for the new superconductor SrPtAs according to first principle calculations, and by functional renormalization group we investigated the effect of electron correlations and spin-orbital coupling (SOC) in Cooper pairing. We found that out of the five $d$-orbitals, the $(xz,yz)$-orbitals are the active ones responsible for superconductivity, and ferromagnetic fluctuations enhanced by the proximity to the van Hove singularity triggers $f$-wave triplet pairing. The superconducting transition temperature increases as the Fermi level is closer to the van Hove singularity until ferromagnetism sets in. The $d$-vector of the triplet pairing component is pinned by SOC along the out-of-plane direction. Experimental perspectives are discussed.
  • The quasiparticle interference (QPI) patterns in BiS$_{2}$-based superconductors are theoretically investigated by taking into account the spin-orbital coupling and assuming the recently proposed $d^{*}_{x^{2}-y^{2}}$-wave pairing symmetry. We found two distinct scattering wave vectors whose evolution can be explained based on the evolution of the constant-energy contours. The QPI spectra presented in this paper can thus be compared with future scanning tunneling microscopy experiments to test whether the pairing symmetry is $d^{*}_{x^{2}-y^{2}}$-wave in BiS$_{2}$-based superconductors.
  • Using functional renormalization group we investigated possible superconductivity in doped Sr$_2$IrO$_4$. In the electron doped case, a $d^*_{x^2-y^2}$-wave superconducting phase is found in a narrow doping region. The pairing is driven by spin fluctuations within the single conduction band. In contrast, for hole doping an $s^*_{\pm}$-wave phase is established, triggered by spin fluctuations within and across the two conduction bands. In all cases there are comparable singlet and triplet components in the pairing function. The Hund's rule coupling reduces (enhances) superconductivity for electron (hole) doping. Our results imply that hole doping is more promising to achieve a higher transition temperature. Experimental perspectives are discussed.
  • Majorana fermions have been intensively studied in recent years for their importance to both fundamental science and potential applications in topological quantum computing1,2. Majorana fermions are predicted to exist in a vortex core of superconducting topological insulators3. However, they are extremely difficult to be distinguished experimentally from other quasiparticle states for the tiny energy difference between Majorana fermions and these states, which is beyond the energy resolution of most available techniques. Here, we overcome the problem by systematically investigating the spatial profile of the Majorana mode and the bound quasiparticle states within a vortex in Bi2Te3/NbSe2. While the zero bias peak in local conductance splits right off the vortex center in conventional superconductors, it splits off at a finite distance ~20nm away from the vortex center in Bi2Te3/NbSe2, primarily due to the Majorana fermion zero mode. While the Majorana mode is destroyed by reducing the distance between vortices, the zero bias peak splits as a conventional superconductor again. This work provides strong evidences of Majorana fermions and also suggests a possible route to manipulating them.
  • The pairing mechanism in the iron pnictides remains unresolved yet. One of the central issues is the structure of the superconducting order parameter which classifies the community into two different and highly disputed camps. On one hand the picture of pairing based on the magnetic origin predicts a sign reversal gap on the electron and hole Fermi pockets, leading to the S+- pairing. On the other hand, a more conventional S++ pairing gap was suggested based on the phonon or orbital fluctuation mediated pairing. In the superconducting state, the impurities may generate a unique pattern of local density of states in space and energy, which are regarded as the fingerprints for checking the structure of the pairing gap. In this study, we successfully identified the non-magnetic and magnetic impurities in Na(Fe0.97-xCo0.03Tx)As (T=Cu, Mn) and investigated the spatial resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We present clear evidence of the in-gap quasiparticle states induced by the nonmagnetic Cu impurities, giving decisive evidence of the S+- pairing. This is corroborated by the consistency between the experimental data and the first-principles calculations based on the S+- pairing gap with a scalar scattering potential.
  • Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictides and chalcogenides in early 2008, a central issue has been the microscopic origin of the superconducting pairing. Although previous experiments suggest that the pairing may be induced by exchanging the antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations and the superconducting order parameter has opposite signs in the electron and hole pockets as predicted by the S+- pairing model, it remains unclear whether there is a bosonic mode from the tunneling spectrum which has a close and universal relationship with superconductivity as well as the spin excitation. In this paper, based on the measurements of scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we show the clear evidence of a bosonic mode with the energy identical to that of the neutron spin resonance in two completely different systems Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and Na(Fe0.975Co0.025)As with different superconducting transition temperatures. In both samples, the superconducting coherence peaks and the mode feature vanish simultaneously inside the vortex core or above Tc, indicating a close relationship between superconductivity and the bosonic mode. Our data also demonstrate a universal ratio between the mode energy and superconducting transition temperature, that is [mode energy]/kBTc ~ 4.3, which underlines the unconventional mechanism of superconductivity in the iron pnictide superconductors.
  • We analyze the point-group symmetries of generic multiband tight-binding models with respect to the transformation properties of the effective interactions. While the vertex functions in the orbital language may transform non-trivially under point-group operations, their point-group behavior in the band language can be simplified by choosing a suitable Bloch basis.We first give two analytically accessible examples. Then we show that, for a large class of models, a natural Bloch basis exists, in which the vertex functions in the band language transform trivially under all point-group operations. As a consequence, the point-group symmetries can be used to reduce the computational effort in perturbative many-particle approaches such as the functional renormalization group.
  • In iron selenide superconductors only electron-like Fermi pockets survive, challenging the $S^{\pm}$ pairing based on the quasi-nesting between the electron and hole Fermi pockets (as in iron arsenides). By functional renormalization group study we show that an in-phase $S$-wave pairing on the electron pockets ($S^{++}_{ee}$) is realized. The pairing mechanism involves two competing driving forces: The strong C-type spin fluctuations cause attractive pair scattering between and within electron pockets via Cooperon excitations on the virtual hole pockets, while the G-type spin fluctuations cause repulsive pair scattering. The latter effect is however weakened by the hybridization splitting of the electron pockets. The resulting $S^{++}_{ee}$-wave pairing symmetry is consistent with experiments. We further propose that the quasiparticle interference pattern in scanning tunneling microscopy and the Andreev reflection in out-of-plane contact tunneling are efficient probes of in-phase versus anti-phase $S$-wave pairing on the electron pockets.
  • The quasiparticle interference (QPI) in Sr$_{2}$RuO$_{4}$ is theoretically studied based on two different pairing models in order to propose an experimental method to test them. For a recently proposed two-dimensional model with pairing primarily from the $\gamma$ band, we found clear QPI peaks evolving with energy and their locations can be determined from the tips of the constant-energy contour (CEC). On the other hand, for a former quasi-one-dimensional model with pairing on the $\alpha$ and $\beta$ bands, the QPI spectra are almost dispersionless and may involve off-shell contributions to the scatterings beyond the CEC. The different behaviors of the QPI in these two models may help to resolve the controversy of active/passive bands and whether Sr$_{2}$RuO$_{4}$ is a topological superconductor.
  • The electronic orders in Hubbard models on a Kagome lattice at van Hove filling are of intense current interest and debate. We study this issue using the singular-mode functional renormalization group theory. We discover a rich variety of electronic instabilities under short range interactions. With increasing on-site repulsion $U$, the system develops successively ferromagnetism, intra unit-cell antiferromagnetism, and charge bond order. With nearest-neighbor Coulomb interaction $V$ alone (U=0), the system develops intra-unit-cell charge density wave order for small $V$, s-wave superconductivity for moderate $V$, and the charge density wave order appears again for even larger $V$. With both $U$ and $V$, we also find spin bond order and chiral $d_{x^2 - y^2} + i d_{xy}$ superconductivity in some particular regimes of the phase diagram. We find that the s-wave superconductivity is a result of charge density wave fluctuations and the squared logarithmic divergence in the pairing susceptibility. On the other hand, the d-wave superconductivity follows from bond order fluctuations that avoid the matrix element effect. The phase diagram is vastly different from that in honeycomb lattices because of the geometrical frustration in the Kagome lattice.
  • In a recent experiment the superconducting gap of a single unit cell thick FeSe film on SrTiO$_3$ substrate is observed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The value of the superconducting gap is much larger than that of the bulk FeSe under ambient pressure. In this paper we study the effects of screening due to the ferroelectric phonons on Cooper pairing. We conclude it can significantly enhance the energy scale of Cooper pairing and even change the pairing symmetry. Our results also raise some concerns on whether phonons can be completely ignored for bulk iron-based superconductors.