• The significant role of interfacial coupling on the superconductivity enhancement in FeSe films on SrTiO3 has been widely recognized. But the explicit origination of this coupling is yet to be identified. Here by surface phonon measurements using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, we found electric field generated by Fuchs-Kliewer (F-K) phonon modes of SrTiO3 can penetrate into FeSe films and strongly interact with electrons therein. The mode-specific electron-phonon coupling (EPC) constant for the ~92 meV F-K phonon is ~0.25 in the single-layer FeSe on SrTiO3. With increasing FeSe thickness, the penetrating field intensity decays exponentially, which matches well the observed exponential decay of the superconducting gap. It is unambiguously shown that the SrTiO3 F-K phonon penetrating into FeSe is essential in the interfacial superconductivity enhancement.
  • Semimetallic tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) displays an extremely large non-saturating magnetoresistance (XMR), which is the subject of intense interest. This phenomenon is thought to arise from the combination of perfect n-p charge compensation with low carrier densities in WTe2 and presumably details of its band structure. Recently, "spin texture" induced by strong spin-orbital coupling (SOC) has been observed in WTe2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This provides a mechanism for protecting backscattering for the states involved and thus was proposed to play an important role in the XMR of WTe2. Here, based on our density functional calculations for bulk WTe2, we found a strong Rashba spin-orbit effect in the calculated band structure due to its non-centrosymmetric structure. This splits bands and two-fold spin degeneracy of bands is lifted. A prominent Umklapp interference pattern (a spectroscopic feature with involving reciprocal lattice vectors) can be observed by scanning tunneling microscopic (STM) measurements on WTe2 surface at 4.2 K. This differs distinctly from the surface atomic structure demonstrated at 77 K. The energy dependence of Umklapp interference shows a strong correspondence with densities of states integrated from ARPES measurement, manifesting a fact that the bands are spin-split on the opposites side of Gamma point. Spectroscopic survey reveals the ratio of electron/hole asymmetry changes alternately with lateral locations along b axis, providing a microscopic picture for double-carrier transport of semimetallic WTe2. The calculated band structure and Fermi surface is further supported by our ARPES results and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations measurements.
  • The Dirac-like surface states of the topological insulators (TIs) are protected by time reversal symmetry (TRS) and exhibit a host of novel properties. Introducing magnetism into TI, which breaks the TRS, is expected to create exotic topological magnetoelectric effects. A particularly intriguing phenomenon in this case is the magnetic field dependence of electrical resistance, or magnetoresistance (MR). The intricate interplay between topological protection and broken-TRS may lead to highly unconventional MR behaviour that can find unique applications in magnetic sensing and data storage. However, so far the MR of TI with spontaneously broken TRS is still poorly understood, mainly due to the lack of well-controlled experiments. In this work, we investigate the magneto transport properties of a ferromagnetic TI thin film fabricated into a field effect transistor device. We observe an unusually complex evolution of MR when the Fermi level (EF) is tuned across the Dirac point (DP) by gate voltage. In particular, MR tends to be positive when EF lies close to the DP but becomes negative at higher energies. This trend is opposite to that expected from the Berry phase picture for localization, but is intimately correlated with the gate-tuned magnetic order. We show that the underlying physics is the competition between the topology-induced weak antilocalization and magnetism-induced negative MR. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetic order and magneto transport facilitates future TI-based spintronic devices.
  • Weak antilocalization (WAL) and linear magnetoresistance (LMR) are two most commonly observed magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena in topological insulators (TIs) and often attributed to the Dirac topological surface states (TSS). However, ambiguities exist because these phenomena could also come from bulk states (often carrying significant conduction in many TIs) and are observable even in non-TI materials. Here, we demonstrate back-gated ambipolar TI field-effect transistors in (Bi0.04Sb0.96)2Te3 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO3(111), exhibiting a large carrier density tunability (by nearly 2 orders of magnitude) and a metal-insulator transition in the bulk (allowing effectively switching off the bulk conduction). Tuning the Fermi level from bulk band to TSS strongly enhances both the WAL (increasing the number of quantum coherent channels from one to peak around two) and LMR (increasing its slope by up to 10 times). The SS-enhanced LMR is accompanied by a strongly nonlinear Hall effect, suggesting important roles of charge inhomogeneity (and a related classical LMR), although existing models of LMR cannot capture all aspects of our data. Our systematic gate and temperature dependent magnetotransport studies provide deeper insights into the nature of both MR phenomena and reveal differences between bulk and TSS transport in TI related materials.
  • The latest discovery of possible high temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe film grown on a SrTiO3 substrate, together with the observation of its unique electronic structure and nodeless superconducting gap, has generated much attention. Initial work also found that, while the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film exhibits a clear signature of superconductivity, the double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film shows an insulating behavior. Such a dramatic difference between the single-layer and double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films is surprising and the underlying origin remains unclear. Here we report our comparative study between the single-layer and double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films by performing a systematic angle-resolved photoemission study on the samples annealed in vacuum. We find that, like the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film, the as-prepared double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film is insulating and possibly magnetic, thus establishing a universal existence of the magnetic phase in the FeSe/SrTiO3 films. In particular, the double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film shows a quite different doping behavior from the single-layer film in that it is hard to get doped and remains in the insulating state under an extensive annealing condition. The difference originates from the much reduced doping efficiency in the bottom FeSe layer of the double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film from the FeSe-SrTiO3 interface. These observations provide key insights in understanding the origin of superconductivity and the doping mechanism in the FeSe/SrTiO3 films. The property disparity between the single-layer and double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films may facilitate to fabricate electronic devices by making superconducting and insulating components on the same substrate under the same condition.
  • In high temperature cuprate superconductors, it is now generally agreed that the parent compound is a Mott insulator and superconductivity is realized by doping the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator. In the iron-based superconductors, however, the parent compound is mostly antiferromagnetic metal, raising a debate on whether an appropriate starting point should go with an itinerant picture or a localized picture. It has been proposed theoretically that the parent compound of the iron-based superconductors may be on the verge of a Mott insulator, but so far no clear experimental evidence of doping-induced Mott transition has been available. Here we report an electronic evidence of an insulator-superconductor transition observed in the single-layer FeSe films grown on the SrTiO3 substrate. By taking angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the electronic structure and energy gap, we have identified a clear evolution of an insulator to a superconductor with the increasing doping. This observation represents the first example of an insulator-superconductor transition via doping observed in the iron-based superconductors. It indicates that the parent compound of the iron-based superconductors is in proximity of a Mott insulator and strong electron correlation should be considered in describing the iron-based superconductors.
  • Superconductivity in the cuprate superconductors and the Fe-based superconductors is realized by doping the parent compound with charge carriers, or by application of high pressure, to suppress the antiferromagnetic state. Such a rich phase diagram is important in understanding superconductivity mechanism and other physics in the Cu- and Fe-based high temperature superconductors. In this paper, we report a phase diagram in the single-layer FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrate by an annealing procedure to tune the charge carrier concentration over a wide range. A dramatic change of the band structure and Fermi surface is observed, with two distinct phases identified that are competing during the annealing process. Superconductivity with a record high transition temperature (Tc) at ~65 K is realized by optimizing the annealing process. The wide tunability of the system across different phases, and its high-Tc, make the single-layer FeSe film ideal not only to investigate the superconductivity physics and mechanism, but also to study novel quantum phenomena and for potential applications.
  • The latest discovery of high temperature superconductivity signature in single-layer FeSe is significant because it is possible to break the superconducting critical temperature ceiling (maximum Tc~55 K) that has been stagnant since the discovery of Fe-based superconductivity in 2008. It also blows the superconductivity community by surprise because such a high Tc is unexpected in FeSe system with the bulk FeSe exhibiting a Tc at only 8 K at ambient pressure which can be enhanced to 38 K under high pressure. The Tc is still unusually high even considering the newly-discovered intercalated FeSe system A_xFe_{2-y}Se_2 (A=K, Cs, Rb and Tl) with a Tc at 32 K at ambient pressure and possible Tc near 48 K under high pressure. Particularly interesting is that such a high temperature superconductivity occurs in a single-layer FeSe system that is considered as a key building block of the Fe-based superconductors. Understanding the origin of high temperature superconductivity in such a strictly two-dimensional FeSe system is crucial to understanding the superconductivity mechanism in Fe-based superconductors in particular, and providing key insights on how to achieve high temperature superconductivity in general. Here we report distinct electronic structure associated with the single-layer FeSe superconductor. Its Fermi surface topology is different from other Fe-based superconductors; it consists only of electron pockets near the zone corner without indication of any Fermi surface around the zone center. Our observation of large and nearly isotropic superconducting gap in this strictly two-dimensional system rules out existence of node in the superconducting gap. These results have provided an unambiguous case that such a unique electronic structure is favorable for realizing high temperature superconductivity.
  • Using first-principles calculations, we systematically study the dissociation of O$_2$ molecules on different ultrathin Pb(111) films. Based on our previous work revealing the molecular adsorption precursor states for O$_2$, we further explore that why there are two nearly degenerate adsorption states on Pb(111) ultrathin films, but no precursor adsorption states exist at all on the Mg(0001) and Al(111) surfaces. And the reason is concluded to be the different surface electronic structures. For the O$_2$ dissociation, we consider both the reaction channels from gas-like and molecularly adsorbed O$_2$ molecules. We find that the energy barrier for O$_2$ dissociation from the molecular adsorption precursor states is always smaller than from O$_2$ gases. The most energetically favorable dissociation process is found to be the same on different Pb(111) films, and the energy barriers are found to be modulated by the quantum size effects of Pb(111) films.
  • We report the observation of a novel phenomenon, the self-retracting motion of graphite, in which tiny flakes of graphite, after being displaced to various suspended positions from islands of highly orientated pyrolytic graphite, retract back onto the islands under no external influences. Our repeated probing and observing such flakes of various sizes indicate the existence of a critical size of flakes, approximately 35 micrometer, above which the self-retracting motion does not occur under the operation. This helps to explain the fact that the self-retracting motion of graphite has not been reported, because samples of natural graphite are typical larger than this critical size. In fact, reports of this phenomenon have not been found in the literature for single crystals of any kinds. A model that includes the static and dynamic shear strengths, the van der Waals interaction force, and the edge dangling bond interaction effect, was used to explain the observed phenomenon. These findings may conduce to create nano-electromechanical systems with a wide range of mechanical operating frequency from mega to giga hertzs.
  • We observe the inverse spin Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas confined in AlGaAs/InGaAs quantum wells. Specifically, we find that an inhomogeneous spin density induced by the optical injection gives rise an electric current transverse to both the spin polarization and its gradient. The spin Hall conductivity can be inferred from such a measurement through the Einstein relation and the Onsager relation, and is found to have the order of magnitude of $0.5(e^{2}/h)$. The observation is made at the room temperature and in samples with macroscopic sizes, suggesting that the inverse spin Hall effect is a robust macroscopic transport phenomenon.