• Quantum criticality is a fundamental organizing principle for studying strongly correlated systems. Nevertheless, understanding quantum critical dynamics at nonzero temperatures is a major challenge of condensed matter physics due to the intricate interplay between quantum and thermal fluctuations. The recent experiments in the quantum spin dimer material TlCuCl$_3$ provide an unprecedented opportunity to test the theories of quantum criticality. We investigate the nonzero temperature quantum critical spin dynamics by employing an effective $O(N)$ field theory. The on-shell mass and the damping rate of quantum critical spin excitations as functions of temperature are calculated based on the renormalized coupling strength, which are in excellent agreements with experiment observations. Their $T\ln T$ dependence is predicted to be dominant at very low temperatures, which is to be tested in future experiments. Our work provides confidence that quantum criticality as a theoretical framework, being considered in so many different contexts of condensed matter physics and beyond, is indeed grounded in materials and experiments accurately. It is also expected to motivate further experimental investigations on the applicability of the field theory to related quantum critical systems.
  • Motivated by the recent low-tempearture experiments on bulk FeSe, we study the electron correlation effects in a multiorbital model for this compound in the nematic phase using the $U(1)$ slave-spin theory. We find that a finite nematic order helps to stabilize an orbital selective Mott phase. Moreover, we propose that when the $d$- and $s$-wave bond nematic orders are combined with the ferro-orbital order, there exists a surprisingly large orbital selectivity between the $xz$ and $yz$ orbitals even though the associated band splitting is relatively small. Our results explain the seemingly unusual observation of strong orbital selectivity in the nematic phase of FeSe, and uncover new clues on the nature of the nematic order, and sets the stage to elucidate the interplay between superconductivity and nematicity in iron-based superconductors.
  • An appropriate description of the state of matter that appears as a second order phase transition is tuned toward zero temperature, {\it viz.} quantum-critical point (QCP), poses fundamental and still not fully answered questions. Experiments are needed both to test basic conclusions and to guide further refinement of theoretical models. Here, charge and entropy transport properties as well as AC specific heat of the heavy-fermion compound CeRh$_{0.58}$Ir$_{0.42}$In$_5$, measured as a function of pressure, reveal two qualitatively different QCPs in a {\it single} material driven by a {\it single} non-symmetry-breaking tuning parameter. A discontinuous sign-change jump in thermopower suggests an unconventional QCP at $p_{c1}$ accompanied by an abrupt Fermi-surface reconstruction that is followed by a conventional spin-density-wave critical point at $p_{c2}$ across which the Fermi surface evolves smoothly to a heavy Fermi-liquid state. These experiments are consistent with some theoretical predictions, including the sequence of critical points and the temperature dependence of the thermopower in their vicinity.
  • We consider the scaling behavior of thermodynamic quantities in the one-dimensional transverse field Ising model near its quantum critical point (QCP). Our study has been motivated by the question about the thermodynamical signatures of this paradigmatic quantum critical system and, more generally, by the issue of how quantum criticality accumulates entropy. We find that the crossovers in the phase diagram of temperature and (the non-thermal control parameter) transverse field obey a general scaling ansatz, and so does the critical scaling behavior of the specific heat and magnetic expansion coefficient. Furthermore, the Gr\"uneisen ratio diverges in a power-law way when the QCP is accessed as a function of the transverse field at zero temperature, which follows the prediction of quantum critical scaling. However, at the critical field, upon decreasing the temperature, the Gr\"uneisen ratio approaches a constant instead of showing the expected divergence. We are able to understand this unusual result in terms of a peculiar form of the quantum critical scaling function for the free energy; the contribution to the Gr\"uneisen ratio vanishes at the linear order in a suitable Taylor expansion of the scaling function. In spite of this special form of the scaling function, we show that the entropy is still maximized near the QCP, as expected from the general scaling argument. Our results establish the telltale thermodynamic signature of a transverse-field Ising chain, and will thus facilitate the experimental identification of this model quantum-critical system in real materials.
  • Our understanding of correlated electron systems is vexed by the complexity of their interactions. Heavy fermion compounds are archetypal examples of this physics, leading to exotic properties that weave together magnetism, superconductivity and strange metal behavior. The Kondo semimetal CeSb is an unusual example where different channels of interaction not only coexist, but their physical signatures are coincident, leading to decades of debate about the microscopic picture describing the interactions between the $f$ moments and the itinerant electron sea. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we resonantly enhance the response of the Ce$f$-electrons across the magnetic transitions of CeSb and find there are two distinct modes of interaction that are simultaneously active, but on different kinds of carriers. This study is a direct visualization of how correlated systems can reconcile the coexistence of different modes on interaction - by separating their action in momentum space, they allow their coexistence in real space.
  • Unconventional superconductivity typically emerges in the presence of quasi-degenerate ground states, and the associated intense fluctuations are likely responsible for generating the superconducting state. Here we use polarized neutron scattering to study the spin space anisotropy of spin excitations in Fe$_{1.07}$Te exhibiting bicollinear antiferromagnetic (AF) order, the parent compound of FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_x$ superconductors. We confirm that the low energy spin excitations are transverse spin waves, consistent with a local-moment origin of the bicollinear AF order. While the ordered moments lie in the $ab$-plane in Fe$_{1.07}$Te, it takes less energy for them to fluctuate out-of-plane, similar to BaFe$_2$As$_2$ and NaFeAs. At energies above $E\gtrsim20$ meV, we find magnetic scattering to be dominated by an isotropic continuum that persists up to at least 50 meV. Although the isotropic spin excitations cannot be ascribed to spin waves from a long-range ordered local moment antiferromagnet, the continuum can result from the bicollinear magnetic order ground state of Fe$_{1.07}$Te being quasi-degenerate with plaquette magnetic order.
  • Insulating states can be topologically nontrivial, a well-established notion that is exemplified by the quantum Hall effect and topological insulators. By contrast, topological metals have not been experimentally evidenced until recently. In systems with strong correlations, they have yet to be identified. Heavy fermion semimetals are a prototype of strongly correlated systems and, given their strong spin-orbit coupling, present a natural setting to make progress. Here we advance a Weyl-Kondo semimetal phase in a periodic Anderson model on a noncentrosymmetric lattice. The quasiparticles near the Weyl nodes develop out of the Kondo effect, as do the surface states that feature Fermi arcs. We determine the key signatures of this phase, which are realized in the heavy fermion semimetal Ce$_3$Bi$_4$Pd$_3$. Our findings provide the much-needed theoretical foundation for the experimental search of topological metals with strong correlations, and open up a new avenue for systematic studies of such quantum phases that naturally entangle multiple degrees of freedom.
  • Due to the interaction between topological defects of an order parameter and underlying fermions, the defects can possess induced fermion numbers, leading to several exotic phenomena of fundamental importance to both condensed matter and high energy physics. One of the intriguing outcome of induced fermion number is the presence of fluctuating competing orders inside the core of topological defect. In this regard, the interaction between fermions and skyrmion excitations of antiferromagnetic phase can have important consequence for understanding the global phase diagrams of many condensed matter systems where antiferromagnetism and several singlet orders compete. We critically investigate the relation between fluctuating competing orders and skyrmion excitations of the antiferromagnetic insulating phase of a half-filled Kondo-Heisenberg model on honeycomb lattice. By combining analytical and numerical methods we obtain exact eigenstates of underlying Dirac fermions in the presence of a single skyrmion configuration, which are used for computing induced chiral charge. Additionally, by employing this nonperturbative eigenbasis we calculate the susceptibilities of different translational symmetry breaking charge, bond and current density wave orders and translational symmetry preserving Kondo singlet formation. Based on the computed susceptibilities we establish spin Peierls and Kondo singlets as dominant competing orders of antiferromagnetism. We show favorable agreement between our findings and field theoretic predictions based on perturbative gradient expansion scheme which crucially relies on adiabatic principle and plane wave eigenstates for Dirac fermions. The methodology developed here can be applied to many other correlated systems supporting competition between spin-triplet and spin-singlet orders in both lower and higher spatial dimensions.
  • Studies on the heavy-fermion pyrochlore iridate (Pr$_2$Ir$_2$O$_7$) point to the role of time-reversal-symmetry breaking in geometrically frustrated Kondo lattices. With this motivation, here we study the effect of Kondo coupling and chiral spin liquids in a frustrated $J_1-J_2$ model on a square lattice. We treat the Kondo effect within a slave-fermion approach, and discuss our results in the context of a proposed global phase diagram for heavy fermion metals. We calculate the anomalous Hall response for the chiral states of both the Kondo destroyed and Kondo screened phases. Across the quantum critical point, a reconstruction of the Fermi surface leads to a sudden change of the Berry curvature distribution and, consequently, a jump of the anomalous Hall conductance. We discuss the implications of our results for the heavy-fermion pyrochlore iridate and propose an interface structure based on Kondo insulators to further explore such effects.
  • We report magnetic and calorimetric measurements down to T = 1 mK on the canonical heavy-electron metal YbRh2Si2. The data reveal the development of nuclear antiferromagnetic order slightly above 2 mK. The latter weakens the primary electronic antiferromagnetism, thereby paving the way for heavy-electron superconductivity below Tc = 2 mK. Our results demonstrate that superconductivity driven by quantum criticality is a general phenomenon.
  • Electron correlations produce a rich phase diagram in the iron pnictides. Earlier theoretical studies on the correlation effect demonstrated how quantum fluctuations weaken and concurrently suppress a $C_2$-symmetric single-Q antiferromagnetic order and a nematic order. Here we examine the emergent phases near the quantum phase transition. For a $C_4$-symmetric collinear double-Q antiferromagnetic order, we show that it is accompanied by both a charge order and an enhanced nematic susceptibility. Our results provide understanding for several intriguing recent experiments in hole-doped iron arsenides, and bring out common physics that underlies the different magnetic phases of various iron-based superconductors.
  • We report temperature-dependent pair distribution function measurements of Sr$_{1-x}$Na$_{x}$Fe$_2$As$_2$, an iron-based superconductor system that contains a magnetic phase with reentrant tetragonal symmetry, known as the magnetic $C_4$ phase. Quantitative refinements indicate that the instantaneous local structure in the $C_4$ phase is comprised of fluctuating orthorhombic regions with a length scale of $\sim$2 nm, despite the tetragonal symmetry of the average static structure. Additionally, local orthorhombic fluctuations exist on a similar length scale at temperatures well into the paramagnetic tetragonal phase. These results highlight the exceptionally large nematic susceptibility of iron-based superconductors and have significant implications for the magnetic $C_4$ phase and the neighboring $C_2$ and superconducting phases.
  • There is increasing recognition that the multiorbital nature of the 3d electrons is important to the proper description of the electronic states in the normal state of the iron-based superconductors. Earlier studies of the pertinent multiorbital Hubbard models identified an orbital-selective Mott phase, which anchors the orbital-selective behavior seen in the overall phase diagram. An important characteristics of the models is that the orbitals are kinetically coupled -- i.e. hybridized -- to each other, which makes the orbital-selective Mott phase especially nontrivial. A U(1) slave-spin method was used to analyze the model with nonzero orbital-level splittings. Here we develop a Landau free-energy functional to shed further light on this issue. We put the microscopic analysis from the U(1) slave-spin approach in this perspective, and show that the intersite spin correlations are crucial to the renormalization of the bare hybridization amplitude towards zero and the concomitant realization of the orbital-selective Mott transition. Based on this insight, we discuss additional ways to study the orbital-selective Mott physics from a dynamical competition between the interorbital hybridization and collective spin correlations. Our results demonstrate the robustness of the orbital-selective Mott phase in the multiorbital models appropriate for the iron-based superconductors.
  • We study the quantum phase transitions in the nickel pnctides, CeNi$_{2-\delta}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$ ($\delta$ $\approx$ 0.07-0.22). This series displays the distinct heavy fermion behavior in the rarely studied parameter regime of dilute carrier limit. We systematically investigate the magnetization, specific heat and electrical transport down to low temperatures. Upon increasing the P-content, the antiferromagnetic order of the Ce-4$f$ moment is suppressed continuously and vanishes at $x_c \sim$ 0.55. At this doping, the temperature dependences of the specific heat and longitudinal resistivity display non-Fermi liquid behavior. Both the residual resistivity $\rho_0$ and the Sommerfeld coefficient $\gamma_0$ are sharply peaked around $x_c$. When the P-content reaches close to 100\%, we observe a clear low-temperature crossover into the Fermi liquid regime. In contrast to what happens in the parent compound $x$ = 0.0 as a function of pressure, we find a surprising result that the non-Fermi liquid behavior persists over a nonzero range of doping concentration, $x_c<x<0.9$. In this doping range, at the lowest measured temperatures, the temperature dependence of the specific-heat coefficient is logarithmically divergent and that of the electrical resistivity is linear. We discuss the properties of CeNi$_{2-\delta}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$ in comparison with those of its 1111 counterpart, CeNi(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)O. Our results indicate a non-Fermi liquid phase in the global phase diagram of heavy fermion metals.
  • The magnetic and nematic properties of the iron chalcogenides have recently been the subject of intense interest. Motivated by the proposed antiferroquadrupolar and Ising-nematic orders for the bulk FeSe, we study the phase diagram of an $S=1$ generalized bilinear-biquadratic model with multi-neighbor interactions. We find a large parameter regime for a ($\pi$,0) antiferroquadrupolar phase, showing how quantum fluctuations stabilize it by lifting an infinite degeneracy of certain semiclassical states. Evidence for this C$_4$-symmetry-breaking quadrupolar phase is also provided by an unbiased density matrix renormalization group analysis. We discuss the implications of our results for FeSe and related iron-based superconductors.
  • An important challenge in condensed matter physics is understanding iron-based superconductors. Among these systems, the iron selenides hold the record for highest superconducting transition temperature and pose especially striking puzzles regarding the nature of superconductivity. The pairing state of the alkaline iron selenides appears to be of $d$-wave type based on the observation of a resonance mode in neutron scattering, while it seems to be of $s$-wave type from the nodeless gaps observed everywhere on the Fermi surface (FS). Here we propose an orbital-selective pairing state, dubbed $s \tau_{3}$, as a natural explanation of these disparate properties. The pairing function, containing a matrix $\tau_{3}$ in the basis of $3d$-electron orbitals, does not commute with the kinetic part of the Hamiltonian. This dictates the existence of both intraband and interband pairing terms in the band basis. A spin resonance arises from a $d$-wave-type sign change in the intraband pairing component whereas the quasiparticle excitation is fully gapped on the FS due to an $s$-wave-like form factor associated with the addition in quadrature of the intraband and interband pairing terms. We demonstrate that this pairing state is energetically favored when the electron correlation effects are orbitally selective. More generally, our results illustrate how the multiband nature of correlated electrons affords unusual types of superconducting states, thereby shedding new light not only on the iron-based materials but also on a broad range of other unconventional superconductors such as heavy fermion and organic systems.
  • High-temperature superconductivity occurs near antiferromagnetic instabilities and nematic state. Debate remains on the origin of nematic order in FeSe and its relation with superconductivity. Here, we use transport, neutron scatter- ing and Fermi surface measurements to demonstrate that hydro-thermo grown superconducting FeS, an isostructure of FeSe, is a tetragonal paramagnet without nematic order and with a quasiparticle mass significantly reduced from that of FeSe. Only stripe-type spin excitation is observed up to 100 meV. No direct coupling between spin excitation and superconductivity in FeS is found, suggesting that FeS is less correlated and the nematic order in FeSe is due to competing checkerboard and stripe spin fluctuations.
  • In quantum spin systems, singlet phases often develop in the vicinity of an antiferromagnetic order. Typical settings for such problems arise when itinerant fermions are also present. In this work, we develop a theoretical framework for addressing such competing orders in an itinerant system, described by Dirac fermions strongly coupled to an O(3) nonlinear sigma model. We focus on two spatial dimensions, where upon disordering the antiferromagnetic order by quantum fluctuations the singular tunneling events also known as (anti)hedgehogs can nucleate competing singlet orders in the paramagnetic phase. In the presence of an isolated hedgehog configuration of the nonlinear sigma model field, we show that the fermion determinant vanishes as the dynamic Euclidean Dirac operator supports fermion zero modes of definite chirality. This provides a topological mechanism for suppressing the tunneling events. Using the methodology of quantum chromodynamics, we evaluate the fermion determinant in the close proximity of magnetic quantum phase transition, when the antiferromagnetic order parameter field can be described by a dilute gas of hedgehogs and antihedgehogs. We show how the precise nature of emergent singlet order is determined by the overlap between dynamic fermion zero modes of opposite chirality, localized on the hedgehogs and antihedgehogs. For a Kondo-Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, we demonstrate the competition between spin Peierls order and Kondo singlet formation, thereby elucidating its global phase diagram. We also discuss other physical problems that can be addressed within this general framework.
  • Iron-based superconductivity develops near an antiferromagnetic order and out of a bad metal normal state, which has been interpreted as originating from a proximate Mott transition. Whether an actual Mott insulator can be realized in the phase diagram of the iron pnictides remains an open question. Here we use transport, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and neutron scattering to demonstrate that NaFe$_{1-x}$Cu$_x$As near $x\approx 0.5$ exhibits real space Fe and Cu ordering, and are antiferromagnetic insulators with the insulating behavior persisting above the N\'eel temperature, indicative of a Mott insulator. Upon decreasing $x$ from $0.5$, the antiferromagnetic ordered moment continuously decreases, yielding to superconductivity around $x=0.05$. Our discovery of a Mott insulating state in NaFe$_{1-x}$Cu$_x$As thus makes it the only known Fe-based material in which superconductivity can be smoothly connected to the Mott insulating state, highlighting the important role of electron correlations in the high-$T_{\rm c}$ superconductivity.
  • Iron chalcogenides display a rich variety of electronic orders in their phase diagram. A particularly enigmatic case is FeTe, a metal which possesses co-existing hole and electron Fermi surfaces as in the iron pnictides but has a distinct ($\pi$/2,$\pi/2$) bicollinear antiferromagnetic order in the Fe square lattice. While local-moment physics has been recognized as essential for understanding the electronic order, it has been a long-standing challenge to understand how the bicollinear antiferromagnetic ground state emerges in a proper quantum spin model. We show here that a bilinear-biquadratic spin-$1$ model on a square lattice with nonzero ring-exchange interactions exhibits the bicollinear antiferromagnetic order over an extended parameter space in its phase diagram. Our work shows that frustrated magnetism in the quantum spin model provides a unified description of the electronic orders in the iron chalcogenides and iron pnictides.
  • Since its discovery, iron-based superconductivity has been known to develop near an antiferromagnetic order, but this paradigm fails in the iron chalcogenide FeSe, whose single-layer version holds the record for the highest superconducting transition temperature in the iron-based superconductors. The striking puzzle that FeSe displays nematic order (spontaneously broken lattice rotational symmetry) while being non-magnetic, has led to several competing proposals for its origin in terms of either the $3d$-electron's orbital degrees of freedom or spin physics in the form of frustrated magnetism. Here we argue that the phase diagram of FeSe could be described by a quantum spin model with highly frustrated interactions. We implement both the site-factorized wave-function analysis and the large-scale density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) in cylinders to study the spin-$1$ bilinear-biquadratic model on the square lattice, and identify quantum transitions from the well-known $(\pi,0)$ antiferromagnetic state to an exotic $(\pi,0)$ antiferroquadrupolar order, either directly or through a $(\pi/2,\pi)$ antiferromagnetic state. These many phases, while distinct, are all nematic. We also discuss our theoretical ground-state phase diagram to rationalize the experimental low-temperature phase diagram obtained by the NMR~[\onlinecite{Yuweiqiang2016}] and X-ray scattering~[\onlinecite{Bohmer2016}] measurements in pressurized FeSe. Our results suggest that superconductivity in a wide range of iron-based materials has a common origin in the antiferromagnetic correlations of strongly correlated electrons.
  • Heavy fermion systems contain not only strong electron correlations, which promote a rich set of quantum phases, but also a large spin-orbit coupling, which tends to endow the electronic states a topological character. Kondo insulators are understood in terms of a lattice of local moments coupled to conduction electrons in a half-filled band, i.e., with a dense population of about one electron per unit cell. Here, we propose that a new class of Kondo insulator arises when the conduction-electron band is nearly empty ( or, equivalently, full ) . We demonstrated the effect through a honeycomb Anderson lattice model. In the empty carrier limit, spin-orbit coupling produces a gap in the hybridized heavy fermion band, thereby generating a topological Kondo insulator. This state can be understood in terms of a nearby phase in the overall phase diagram, a Dirac-Kondo semimetal whose quasiparticle excitations exhibit a non-trivial Berry phase. Our results point to the dilute carrier limit of the heavy-fermion systems as a new setting to study strongly correlated insulating and topological states.
  • The appearance of unconventional superconductivity near many heavy-fermion quantum critical points (QCPs) motivates investigation of pairing correlations close to a "beyond Landau" Kondo-destruction QCP. We focus on a two-Anderson-impurity cluster in which Kondo destruction is induced by a pseudogap in the conduction-electron density of states. Analysis via continuous-time quantum Monte-Carlo and the numerical renormalization group reveals a previously unstudied QCP that both displays the critical-local moment fluctuations characteristic of Kondo destruction and leads to a strongly enhanced singlet-pairing susceptibility. Our results shed light on the extent to which different kinds of magnetic interactions induce pairing correlations in non-Fermi liquid settings, thereby providing new insights into the mechanism for unconventional superconductivity in quantum critical metals.
  • Superconductivity develops in metals upon the formation of a coherent macroscopic quantum state of electron pairs. Iron pnictides and chalcogenides are materials that have high superconducting transition temperatures. In this Review, we describe the advances in the field that have led to higher superconducting transition temperatures in iron-based superconductors and the wide range of materials that form them. We summarize both the essential aspects of the normal state and the mechanism for superconductivity. We emphasize the degree of electron-electron correlations and their manifestation in properties of the normal state. We examine the nature of magnetism, analyse its role in driving the electronic nematicity, and discuss quantum criticality at the border of magnetism in the phase diagram. Finally, we review the amplitude and structure of the superconducting pairing, and survey the potential settings for optimizing superconductivity.
  • Considerations of the bad-metal behavior led to an early proposal for a quantum critical point under a P for As doping in the iron pnictides, which has since been experimentally observed. We study here an effective model for the isoelectronically tuned pnictides using a large-$N$ approach. The model contains antiferromagnetic and Ising-nematic order parameters appropriate for $J_1$-$J_2$ exchange-coupled local moments on an Fe square lattice, and a damping caused by coherent itinerant electrons. The zero-temperature magnetic and Ising transitions are concurrent and essentially continuous. The order-parameter jumps are very small, and are further reduced by the inter-plane coupling; quantum criticality hence occurs over a wide dynamical range. Our results provide the basis for further studies on the quantum critical properties in the P-doped iron arsenides.