• Integrated optical power splitter is one of the fundamental building blocks in photonic integrated circuits (PIC). Conventional multimode interferometer based power splitter is widely used as it has reasonable footprint and is easy to fabricate. However, it is challenging to realize arbitrary split ratio especially for multi-outputs. In this work, an ultra-compact power splitter with a QR code-like nanostructure is designed by a nonlinear fast search method (FSM). The highly functional structure is composed of a number of freely designed square pixels with the size of 120nm x 120nm which could be either dielectric or air. The lightwaves are scattered by a number of etched squares with optimized locations and the scattered waves superimpose at the outputs with the desired power ratio. We demonstrate 1x2 splitters with 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 split ratios and a 1x3 splitter with the ratio of 1:2:1. The footprint for all the devices is only 3.6umx3.6 um. Well-controlled split ratios are measured for all the cases. The measured transmission efficiencies of all the splitters are close to 80% over 30 nm wavelength range.
  • Lead halide perovskite based micro- and nano- lasers have been widely studied in past two years. Due to their long carrier diffusion length and high external quantum efficiency, lead halide perovskites have been considered to have bright future in optoelectronic devices, especially in the "green gap" wavelength region. However, the quality (Q) factors of perovskite lasers are unspectacular compared to conventional microdisk lasers. The record value of full width at half maximum (FWHM) at threshold is still around 0.22 nm. Herein we synthesized solution-processed, single-crystalline CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite microrods and studied their lasing actions. In contrast to entirely pumping a microrod on substrate, we partially excited the microrods that were hanging in the air. Consequently, single-mode or few-mode laser emissions have been successfully obtained from the whispering-gallery like diamond modes, which are confined by total internal reflection within the transverse plane. Owning to the better light confinement and high crystal quality, the FWHM at threshold have been significantly improved. The smallest FWHM at threshold is around 0.1 nm, giving a Q factor over 5000.
  • Solution-based perovskite nanoparticles have been intensively studied in past few years due to their applications in both photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. Here, based on the common ground between the solution-based perovskite and random lasers, we have studied the mirrorless lasing actions in self-assembled perovskite nanoparticles. After the synthesis from solution, discrete lasing peaks have been observed from the optically pumped perovskites without any well-defined cavity boundaries. The obtained quality (Q) factors and thresholds of random lasers are around 500 and 60 uJ/cm2, respectively. Both values are comparable to the conventional perovskite microdisk lasers with polygon shaped cavity boundaries. From the corresponding studies on laser spectra and fluorescence microscope images, the lasing actions are considered as random lasers that are generated by strong multiple scattering in random gain media. In additional to conventional single-photon excitation, due to the strong nonlinear effects of perovskites, two-photon pumped random lasers have also been demonstrated for the first time. We believe this research will find its potential applications in low-cost coherent light sources and biomedical detection.
  • Perovskite based micro- and nano- lasers have attracted considerable research attention in past two years. However, the properties of perovskite devices are mostly fixed once they are synthesized. Here we demonstrate the tailoring of lasing properties of perovskite nanowire lasers via nano-manipulation. By utilizing a tungsten probe, one nanowire has been lifted from the wafer and re-positioned its two ends on two nearby perovskite blocks. Consequently, the conventional Fabry-Perot lasers are completely suppressed and a single laser peak has been observed. The corresponding numerical model reveals that the single-mode lasing operation is formed by the whispering gallery mode in the transverse plane of perovskite nanowire. Our research provides a simple way to tailor the properties of nanowire and it will be essential for the applications of perovskite optoelectronics.
  • Solution-processed lead halide perovskites have shown very bright future in both solar cells and microlasers. Very recently, the nonlinearity of perovskites started to attract considerable research attention. Second harmonic generation and two-photon absorption have been successfully demonstrated. However, the nonlinearity based perovskite devices such as micro- & nano- lasers are still absent. Here we demonstrate the two-photon pumped nanolasers from perovskite nanowires. The CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite nanowires were synthesized with one-step solution self-assembly method and dispersed on glass substrate. Under the optical excitation at 800 nm, two-photon pumped lasing actions with periodic peaks have been successfully observed at around 546 nm. The obtained quality (Q) factors of two-photon pumped nanolasers are around 960, and the corresponding thresholds are about 674?J=cm2. Both the Q factors and thresholds are comparable to conventional whispering gallery modes in two-dimensional polygon microplates. Our researches are the first demonstrations of two-photon pumped nanolasers in perovskite nanowires. We believe our finding will significantly expand the application of perovskite in low-cost nonlinear optical devices such as optical limiting, optical switch, and biomedical imaging et al.
  • Monochromaticity and directionality are two key characteristics of lasers. However, the combination of directional emission and single-mode operation is quite challenging, especially for the on-chip devices. Here we propose a microdisk laser with single-mode operation and directional emissions by exploiting the recent developments associated with parity-time (PT) symmetry. This is accomplished by introducing one-dimensional periodic gain and loss into a circular microdisk, which induces a coupling between whispering gallery modes with different radial numbers. The lowest threshold mode is selected at the positions with least initial wavelength difference. And the directional emissions are formed by the introduction of additional grating vectors by the periodic distribution of gain and loss regions. We believe this research will impact the practical applications of on-chip microdisk lasers.
  • Recently, the coexistence of parity-time (PT) symmetric laser and absorber has gained tremendous research attention. While the PT symmetric absorber has been observed in microwave metamaterials, the experimental demonstration of PT symmetric laser is still absent. Here we experimentally study PT-symmetric laser absorber in stripe waveguide. Using the concept of PT symmetry to exploit the light amplification and absorption, PT-symmetric laser absorbers have been successfully obtained. Different from the single-mode PT symmetric lasers, the PT-symmetric stripe lasers have been experimentally confirmed by comparing the relative wavelength positions and mode spacing under different pumping conditions. When the waveguide is half pumped, the mode spacing is doubled and the lasing wavelengths shift to the center of every two initial lasing modes. All these observations are consistent with the theoretical predictions and confirm the PT-symmetry breaking well.
  • Coupling light into microdisk plays a key role in a number of applications such as resonant filters and optical sensors. While several approaches have successfully coupled light into microdisk efficiently, most of them suffer from the ultrahigh sensitivity to the environmental vibration. Here we demonstrate a robust mechanism, which is termed as end-fire injection. By connecting an input waveguide to a circular microdisk directly, the mechanism shows that light can be efficiently coupled into optical microcavity. The coupling efficiency can be as high as 0.75 when the input signals are on resonances. Our numerical results reveal that the high coupling efficiency is attributed to the constructive interference between the whispering gallery modes and the input signals. We have also shown that the end-fire injection can be further extended to the long-lived resonances with low refractive index such as n = 1.45. We believe our results will shed light on the applications of optical microcavities.
  • Recently, on-chip single-mode laser emission has attracted considerable research attention due to its wide applications. While most of single-mode lasers in coupled microdisks or microrings have been qualitatively explained by either Vernier effect or inversed Vernier effect, none of them have been experimentally confirmed. Here, we studied the mechanism for single-mode operation in coupled microdisks. We found that the mode numbers had been significantly reduced to nearly single-mode within a large pumping power range from threshold to gain saturation. The detail laser spectra showed that the largest gain and the first lasing peak were mainly generated by one disk and the laser intensity was proportional to the frequency detuning. The corresponding theoretical analysis showed that the experimental observations were dominated by internal coupling within one cavity, which was similar to the recently explored inversed Vernier effect in two coupled microrings. We believe our finding will be important for understanding the previous experimental findings and the development of on-chip single-mode laser.
  • Light confinement and amplification in micro- & nano-fiber have been intensively studied and a number of applications have been developed. However, the typical micro- & anno- fibers are usually free-standing or positioned on a substrate with lower refractive index to ensure the light confinement and guiding mode. Here we numerically and experimentally demonstrate the possibility of confining light within a microfiber on a high refractive index substrate. In contrast to the strong leaky to the substrate, we found that the radiation loss was dependent on the radius of microfiber and the refractive index contrast. Consequently, quasi-guiding modes could be formed and the light could propagate and be amplified in such systems. By fabricating tapered silica fiber and dye-doped polymer fiber and placing them on sapphire substrates, the light propagation, amplification, and laser behaviors have been experimentally studied to verify the quasi-guiding modes in microfer with higher index substrate. We believe that our research will be essential for the applications of micro- and nano-fibers.
  • We show that coupling among multiple resonances can be conveniently introduced and controlled by boundary wave scattering. We demonstrate this principle in optical microcavities of quasi-circular shape, where the couplings of multiple modes are determined by the scattering from different harmonic boundary deformations. We analyze these couplings using a perturbation theory, which gives an intuitive understanding of the first-order and higher-order scattering processes. Different scattering paths between two boundary waves can either enhance or reduce their coupling strength. The effect of controlled multimode coupling is most pronounced in the direction of output from an open cavity, which can cause a dramatic change of the external cavity field distribution.
  • We report a surprising observation that the output directionality from wavelength-scale optical microcavities displays extreme sensitivity to deformations of the cavity shape. A variation of the cavity boundary on the order of ten thousandth of a wavelength may flip the output directions by 180 degrees. Our analysis based on a perturbation theory reveals that a tiny shape variation can cause a strong mixing of nearly degenerate cavity resonances with different angular momenta, and their interference determines the farfield emission pattern. This work shows the possibility of utilizing carefully-designed wavelength-scale microcavities for high-resolution detection and sensing applications.
  • The local chiral symmetry between clockwise (CW) and counter-clockwise (CCW) propagating light in a deformed microcavity can be broken by wave optics effects, which become significant as the cavity size approaches the wavelength. We show that the spatial separation of the CW and CCW ray orbits underlying the high quality factor resonant modes results in unidirectional emission in free space. In the presence of a waveguide, evanescent coupling also becomes directional, and the output direction can be varied by selecting the coupling position along the cavity boundary. Our results demonstrate that the local chirality can be utilized to control the output directionality and enhance the collection efficiency of emission from ultrasmall resonators.
  • Here we demonstrate a new concept for designing an ultra-sensitive deformed cavity biosensor. Owning to the breaking of rotational symmetry, the field distribution is not uniform along the cavity boundary and results in the dependence of spectra shift and mode splitting on the position of a scatter. In this case, the deformed cavity sensor can be extremely sensitive to the location of particle binding on the cavity boundary. Moreover, the directional emission from the deformed microcavity provides a possibility to detect a single particle or molecule in the far field.