• In this article we provide a systematic way of creating generalized Moran sets using an analogous iterated function system (IFS) procedure. We use a step-wise adjustable IFS to introduce some variance (such as non-self-similarity) in the fractal limit sets. The process retains the computational simplicity of a standard IFS procedure. In our construction of the generalized Moran sets, we also weaken the fourth Moran Structure Condition that requires the same pattern of diameter ratios be used across a generation. Moreover, we provide upper and lower bounds for the Hausdorff dimension of the fractals created from this generalized process. Specific examples (Cantor-like sets, Sierpinski-like Triangles, etc) with the calculations of their corresponding dimensions are studied.
  • We investigate the following question: what is the set of unit volume which can be best irrigated starting from a single source at the origin, in the sense of branched transport? We may formulate this question as a shape optimization problem and prove existence of solutions, which can be considered as a sort of "unit ball" for branched transport. We establish some elementary properties of optimizers and describe these optimal sets A as sublevel sets of a so-called landscape function which is now classical in branched transport. We prove $\beta$-H{\"o}lder regularity of the landscape function, allowing us to get an upper bound on the Minkowski dimension of the boundary: dim $\partial$A $\le$ d -- $\beta$ (where $\beta$ := d($\alpha$ -- (1 -- 1/d)) $\in$ (0, 1) is a relevant exponent in branched transport, associated with the exponent $\alpha$ > 1 -- 1/d appearing in the cost). We are not able to prove the upper bound, but we conjecture that $\partial$A is of non-integer dimension d -- $\beta$. Finally, we make an attempt to compute numerically an optimal shape, using an adaptation of the phase-field approximation of branched transport introduced some years ago by Oudet and the second author.
  • This paper proposes an optimal allocation problem with ramified transport technology in a spatial economy. Ramified transportation is used to model the transport economy of scale in group transportation observed widely in both nature and efficiently designed transport systems of branching structures. The ramified allocation problem aims at finding an optimal allocation plan as well as an associated optimal allocation path to minimize overall cost of transporting commodity from factories to households. This problem differentiates itself from existing ramified transportation literature in that the distribution of production among factories is not fixed but endogenously determined as observed in many allocation practices. It's shown that due to the transport economy of scale in ramified transportation, each optimal allocation plan corresponds equivalently to an optimal assignment map from households to factories. This optimal assignment map provides a natural partition of both households and allocation paths. We develop methods of marginal transportation analysis and projectional analysis to study properties of optimal assignment maps. These properties are then related to the search for an optimal assignment map in the context of state matrix.
  • This paper shows that a well designed transport system has an embedded exchange value by serving as a market for potential exchange between consumers. Under suitable conditions, one can improve the welfare of consumers in the system simply by allowing some exchange of goods between consumers during transportation without incurring additional transportation costs. We propose an explicit valuation formula to measure this exchange value for a given compatible transport system. This value is always nonnegative and bounded from above. Criteria based on transport structures, preferences and prices are provided to determine the existence of a positive exchange value. Finally, we study a new optimal transport problem with an objective taking into account of both transportation cost and exchange value.
  • In this article, we define the transport dimension of probability measures on $\mathbb{R}^m$ using ramified optimal transportation theory. We show that the transport dimension of a probability measure is bounded above by the Minkowski dimension and below by the Hausdorff dimension of the measure. Moreover, we introduce a metric, called "the dimensional distance", on the space of probability measures on $\mathbb{R}^m$. This metric gives a geometric meaning to the transport dimension: with respect to this metric, we show that the transport dimension of a probability measure equals to the distance from it to any finite atomic probability measure.
  • An optimal transport path may be viewed as a geodesic in the space of probability measures under a suitable family of metrics. This geodesic may exhibit a tree-shaped branching structure in many applications such as trees, blood vessels, draining and irrigation systems. Here, we extend the study of ramified optimal transportation between probability measures from Euclidean spaces to a geodesic metric space. We investigate the existence as well as the behavior of optimal transport paths under various properties of the metric such as completeness, doubling, or curvature upper boundedness. We also introduce the transport dimension of a probability measure on a complete geodesic metric space, and show that the transport dimension of a probability measure is bounded above by the Minkowski dimension and below by the Hausdorff dimension of the measure. Moreover, we introduce a metric, called "the dimensional distance", on the space of probability measures. This metric gives a geometric meaning to the transport dimension: with respect to this metric, the transport dimension of a probability measure equals to the distance from it to any finite atomic probability measure.
  • In this article, we study the geodesic problem in a generalized metric space, in which the distance function satisfies a relaxed triangle inequality $d(x,y)\leq \sigma (d(x,z)+d(z,y))$ for some constant $\sigma \geq 1$, rather than the usual triangle inequality. Such a space is called a quasimetric space. We show that many well-known results in metric spaces (e.g. Ascoli-Arzel\`{a} theorem) still hold in quasimetric spaces. Moreover, we explore conditions under which a quasimetric will induce an intrinsic metric. As an example, we introduce a family of quasimetrics on the space of atomic probability measures. The associated intrinsic metrics induced by these quasimetrics coincide with the $d_{\alpha}$ metric studied early in the study of branching structures arisen in ramified optimal transportation. An optimal transport path between two atomic probability measures typically has a "tree shaped" branching structure. Here, we show that these optimal transport paths turn out to be geodesics in these intrinsic metric spaces.
  • This article provides numerical simulation of an optimal transport path from a single source to an atomic measure of equal total mass. We first construct an initial transport path, and then modify the path as much as possible by using both local and global minimization algorithms.