• The broad success of theoretical and experimental quantum optimal control is intimately connected to the topology of the underlying control landscape. For several common quantum control goals, including the maximization of an observable expectation value, the landscape has been shown to lack local optima if three assumptions are satisfied: (i) the quantum system is controllable, (ii) the Jacobian of the map from the control field to the evolution operator is full-rank, and (iii) the control field is not constrained. In the case of the observable objective, this favorable analysis shows that the associated landscape also contains saddles, i.e., critical points that are not local suboptimal extrema. In this paper, we investigate whether the presence of these saddles affects the trajectories of gradient-based searches for an optimal control. We show through simulations that both the detailed topology of the control landscape and the parameters of the system Hamiltonian influence whether the searches are attracted to a saddle. For some circumstances with a special initial state and target observable, optimizations may approach a saddle very closely, reducing the efficiency of the gradient algorithm. Encounters with such attractive saddles are found to be quite rare. Neither the presence of a large number of saddles on the control landscape nor a large number of system states increase the likelihood that a search will closely approach a saddle. Even for applications that encounter a saddle, well-designed gradient searches with carefully chosen algorithmic parameters will readily locate optimal controls.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of the landscape for full quantum-quantum control associated with the expectation value of an arbitrary observable of one quantum system controlled by another quantum system. It is shown that such full quantum-quantum control landscapes are convex, and hence devoid of local suboptima and saddle points that may exist in landscapes for quantum systems controlled by time-dependent classical fields. There is no controllability requirement for the full quantum-quantum landscape to be trap-free, although the forms of Hamiltonians, the flexibility in choosing initial state of the controller, as well as the control duration, can infulence the reachable optimal value on the landscape. All level sets of the full quantum-quantum landscape are connected convex sets. Finally, we show that the optimal solution of the full quantum-quantum control landscape can be readily determined numerically, which is demonstrated using the Jaynes-Cummings model depicting a two-level atom interacting with a quantized radiation field.
  • The growing successes in performing quantum control experiments motivated the development of control landscape analysis as a basis to explain these findings.When a quantum system is controlled by an electromagnetic field, the observable as a functional of the control field forms a landscape. Theoretical analyses have revealed many properties of control landscapes, especially regarding their slopes, curvatures, and topologies. A full experimental assessment of the landscape predictions is important for future consideration of controlling quantum phenomena. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is exploited here as an ideal laboratory setting for quantitative testing of the landscape principles. The experiments are performed on a simple two-level proton system in a H$_2$O-D$_2$O sample. We report a variety of NMR experiments roving over the control landscape based on estimation of the gradient and Hessian, including ascent or descent of the landscape, level set exploration, and an assessment of the theoretical predictions on the structure of the Hessian. The experimental results are fully consistent with the theoretical predictions. The procedures employed in this study provide the basis for future multispin control landscape exploration where additional features are predicted to exist.