• We present the results of optical identifications and spectroscopic redshifts measurements for galaxy clusters from 2-nd Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources (PSZ2), located at high redshifts, $z\approx0.7-0.9$. We used the data of optical observations obtained with Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT150), Sayan observatory 1.6-m telescope, Calar Alto 3.5-m telescope and 6-m SAO RAS telescope (Bolshoi Teleskop Alt-azimutalnyi, BTA). Spectroscopic redshift measurements were obtained for seven galaxy clusters, including one cluster, PSZ2 G126.57+51.61, from the cosmological sample of PSZ2 catalogue. In central regions of two clusters, PSZ2 G069.39+68.05 and PSZ2 G087.39-34.58, the strong gravitationally lensed background galaxies are found, one of them at redshift $z=4.262$. The data presented below roughly double the number of known galaxy clusters in the second Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources at high redshifts, $z\approx0.8$.
  • We present a catalogue of galaxy clusters detected in the Planck all-sky Compton parameter maps and identified using data from the WISE and SDSS surveys. The catalogue comprises about 3000 clusters in the SDSS fields. We expect the completeness of this catalogue to be high for clusters with masses larger than M_500 =~ 3x10^14 Msun, located at redshifts z<0.7. At redshifts above z=~0.4, the catalogue contains approximately an order of magnitude more clusters than the 2nd Planck Catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources in the same fields of the sky. This catalogue can be used for identification of massive galaxy clusters in future large cluster surveys, such as the SRG/eROSITA all-sky X-ray survey.
  • We present a sample of cataclysmic variables (CVs) identified among the X-ray sources from the 400 square degree X-ray survey based on ROSAT pointing data (400d). The procedure of the CV selection among the X-ray sources using additional optical and infrared data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and WISE survey is described. The results of the optical observations of the selected objects carried out mainly with the Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT-150) and the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (BTA) are presented. Some observations have also been performed with the Sayan Observatory 1.6-m AZT-33IK telescope. Currently we selected eight CVs, four of which were found for the first time in our work. Based on this sample, we have obtained preliminary constraints on the CV X-ray luminosity function in the solar neighborhood in the low luminosity range, L_X ~ 10^29-10^30 erg s^-1 (0.5-2 keV). We show that the logarithmic slope of the CV X-ray luminosity function in this luminosity range is less steep than at L_X > 10^31 erg s^-1. From our CV X-ray luminosity function estimates it follows that few thousand CVs will be detected in theSpectrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) observatory all-sky X-ray survey at high Galactic latitudes, which will allow to obtain much more accurate measurements of CV X-ray luminosity function in the luminosity range L_X < 10^30-10^31 erg s^-1.
  • We present the results of spectroscopic redshift measurements for the galaxy clusters from the first all-sky Planck catalogue of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, that have been mostly identified by means of the optical observations performed previously by our team (Planck Collaboration, 2015a). The data on 13 galaxy clusters at redshifts from z=~0.2 to z=~0.8, including the improved identification and redshift measurement for the cluster PSZ1 G141.73+14.22 at z=0.828, are provided. The measurements were done using the data from Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT-150), 2.2-m Calar Alto Observatory telescope, and 6-m SAO RAS telescope (Bolshoy Teleskop Azimutalnyi, BTA).
  • We address the cosmological role of an additional ${\cal O}(1)$ eV sterile neutrino in modified gravity models. We confront the present cosmological data with predictions of the FLRW cosmological model based on a variant of $f(R)$ modified gravity proposed by one of the authors previously. This viable cosmological model which deviation from general relativity with a cosmological constant $\Lambda$ decreases as $R^{-2n}$ for large, but not too large values of the Ricci scalar $R$ provides an alternative explanation of present dark energy and the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Various up-to-date cosmological data sets exploited include Planck CMB anisotropy, CMB lensing potential, BAO, cluster mass function and Hubble constant measurements. We find that the CMB+BAO constraints strongly the sum of neutrino masses from above. This excludes values $\lambda\sim 1$ for which distinctive cosmological features of the model are mostly pronounced as compared to the $\Lambda$CDM model, since then free streaming damping of perturbations due to neutrino rest masses is not sufficient to compensate their extra growth occurring in $f(R)$ gravity. Thus, we obtain $\lambda>8.2$ ($2\sigma$) with cluster systematics and $\lambda>9.4$ ($2\sigma$) without that. In the latter case we find for the sterile neutrino mass $0.47\,\,\rm{eV}$$\,<\,$$m_{\nu,\,\rm{sterile}}$$\,<\,$$1\,\,\rm{eV}$ ($2\sigma$) assuming the active neutrinos are massless, not significantly larger than in the standard $\Lambda$CDM with the same data set: $0.45\,\,\rm{eV}$$\,<\,$$m_{\nu,\,\rm{sterile}}$$\,<\,$$0.92\,\,\rm{eV}$ ($2\sigma$). However, a possible discovery of a sterile neutrino with the mass $m_{\nu,\,\rm{sterile}} \approx 1.5\,$eV motivated by various anomalies in neutrino oscillation experiments would favor cosmology based on $f(R)$ gravity rather than the $\Lambda$CDM model.
  • The constraints on total neutrino mass and effective number of neutrino species based on CMB anisotropy power spectrum, Hubble constant, baryon acoustic oscillations and galaxy cluster mass function data are presented. It is shown that the discrepancies between various cosmological data in Hubble constant and density fluctuation amplitude, measured in standard LCDM cosmological model, can be eliminated if more than standard effective number of neutrino species and non-zero total neutrino mass are considered. This extension of LCDM model appears to be \approx 3 \sigma\ significant when all cosmological data are used. The model with approximately one additional neutrino type, N_eff \approx 4, and with non-zero total neutrino mass, \approx 0.5 eV, provide the best fit to the data. In the model with only one massive neutrino the upper limits on neutrino mass are slightly relaxed. It is shown that these deviations from LCDM model appear mainly due to the usage of recent data on the observations of baryon acoustic oscillations. Larger than standard number of neutrino species is measured mainly due to the comparison of the BAO data with direct measurements of Hubble constant, which was already noticed earlier. As it is shown below, the data on galaxy cluster mass function in this case give the measurement of non-zero neutrino mass.
  • We present the cosmological parameters constraints obtained from the combination of galaxy cluster mass function measurements (Vikhlinin et al., 2009a,b) with new cosmological data obtained during last three years: updated measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropy with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observatory, and at smaller angular scales with South Pole Telescope (SPT), new Hubble constant measurements, baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae Type Ia observations. New constraints on total neutrino mass and effective number of neutrino species are obtained. In models with free number of massive neutrinos the constraints on these parameters are notably less strong, and all considered cosmological data are consistent with non-zero total neutrino mass \Sigma m_\nu \approx 0.4 eV and larger than standard effective number of neutrino species, N_eff \approx 4. These constraints are compared to the results of neutrino oscillations searches at short baselines. The updated dark energy equation of state parameters constraints are presented. We show that taking in account systematic uncertainties, current cluster mass function data provide similarly powerful constraints on dark energy equation of state, as compared to the constraints from supernovae Type Ia observations.
  • We study the optical variability of the peculiar Galactic source SS 433 using the observations made with the Russian Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT150). A simple technique which allows to obtain high-quality photometric measurements with 0.3-1 s time resolution using ordinary CCD is described in detail. Using the test observations of nonvariable stars, we show that the atmospheric turbulence introduces no significant distortions into the measured light curves. Therefore, the data obtained in this way are well suited for studying the aperiodic variability of various objects. The large amount of SS 433 optical light curve measurements obtained in this way allowed us to obtain the power spectra of its flux variability with a record sensitivity up to frequencies of ~0.5 Hz and to detect its break at frequency =~2.4e-3 Hz. We suggest that this break in the power spectrum results from the smoothing of the optical flux variability due to a finite size of the emitting region. Based on our measurement of the break frequency in the power spectrum, we estimated the size of the accretion-disk photosphere as 2e12 cm. We show that the amplitude of the variability in SS 433 decreases sharply during accretion-disk eclipses, but it does not disappear completely. This suggests that the size of the variable optical emission source is comparable to that of the normal star whose size is therefore R_O \approx 2e12 cm \approx 30 R_sun. The decrease in flux variability amplitude during eclipses suggests the presence of a nonvariable optical emission component with a magnitude m_R=~13.2.
  • Aims: With this paper we want to investigate the highly variable afterglow light curve and environment of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060526 at $z=3.221$. Methods: We present one of the largest photometric datasets ever obtained for a GRB afterglow, consisting of multi-color photometric data from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The data set contains 412 data points in total to which we add additional data from the literature. Furthermore, we present low-resolution high signal-to-noise spectra of the afterglow. The afterglow light curve is modeled with both an analytical model using broken power law fits and with a broad-band numerical model which includes energy injections. The absorption lines detected in the spectra are used to derive column densities using a multi-ion single-component curve-of-growth analysis from which we derive the metallicity of the host of GRB 060526. Results: The temporal behaviour of the afterglow follows a double broken power law with breaks at $t=0.090\pm0.005$ and $t=2.401\pm0.061$ days. It shows deviations from the smooth set of power laws that can be modeled by additional energy injections from the central engine, although some significant microvariability remains. The broadband spectral-energy distribution of the afterglow shows no significant extinction along the line of sight. The metallicity derived from \ion{S}{II} and \ion{Fe}{II} of [S/H] = --0.57 $\pm$0.25 and [Fe/H] = --1.09$\pm$0.24 is relatively high for a galaxy at that redshift but comparable to the metallicity of other GRB hosts at similar redshifts. At the position of the afterglow, no host is detected to F775W(AB) = 28.5 mag with the HST, implying an absolute magnitude of the host M(1500 \AA{})$>$--18.3 mag which is fainter than most long-duration hosts, although the GRB may be associated with a faint galaxy at a distance of 11 kpc.
  • We have gathered optical photometry data from the literature on a large sample of Swift-era gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows including GRBs up to September 2009, for a total of 76 GRBs, and present an additional three pre-Swift GRBs not included in an earlier sample. Furthermore, we publish 840 additional new photometry data points on a total of 42 GRB afterglows, including large data sets for GRBs 050319, 050408, 050802, 050820A, 050922C, 060418, 080413A and 080810. We analyzed the light curves of all GRBs in the sample and derived spectral energy distributions for the sample with the best data quality, allowing us to estimate the host galaxy extinction. We transformed the afterglow light curves into an extinction-corrected z=1 system and compared their luminosities with a sample of pre-Swift afterglows. The results of a former study, which showed that GRB afterglows clustered and exhibited a bimodal distribution in luminosity space, is weakened by the larger sample. We found that the luminosity distribution of the two afterglow samples (Swift-era and pre-Swift) are very similar, and that a subsample for which we were not able to estimate the extinction, which is fainter than the main sample, can be explained by assuming a moderate amount of line-of-sight host extinction. We derived bolometric isotropic energies for all GRBs in our sample, and found only a tentative correlation between the prompt energy release and the optical afterglow luminosity at one day after the GRB in the z=1 system. A comparative study of the optical luminosities of GRB afterglows with echelle spectra (which show a high number of foreground absorbing systems) and those without reveals no indication that the former are statistically significantly more luminous. (abridged)
  • We present the results of the optical identification of hard X-ray source IGRJ18257-0707 trough the spectroscopic observations of its optical counterpart with RTT150 telescope. Accurate position of the X-ray source, determined using Chandra observations, allowed us to associate this source with the faint optical object (m_R=~20.4), which shows broad H_\alpha emission line in its optical spectrum. Therefore we conclude that the source IGRJ18257-0707 is a type 1 Seyfert galaxy at redshift z=0.037.
  • The results of optical identifications of five hard X-ray sources in the Galactic plane region from the INTEGRAL all-sky survey are presented. The X-ray data on one source (IGRJ20216+4359) are published for the first time. The optical observations were performed with 1.5-m RTT-150 telescope (TUBITAK National Observatory, Antalya, Turkey) and 6-m BTA telescope (Special Astrophysical Observatory, Nizhny Arkhyz, Russia). A blazar, three Seyfert galaxies, and a high-mass X-ray binary are among the identified sources.
  • We present the results of the optical identifications of a set of X-ray sources from the all-sky surveys of INTEGRAL and SWIFT observatories. Optical data were obtained with Russian-Turkish 1.5-m Telescope (RTT150). Nine X-ray sources were identified as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two of them are hosted by nearby, nearly exactly edge-on, spiral galaxies MCG -01-05-047 and NGC 973. One source, IGR J16562-3301, is most probably BL Lac object (blazar). Other AGNs are observed as stellar-like nuclei of spiral galaxies, with broad emission lines in their spectra. For the majority of our hard X-ray selected AGNs, their hard X-ray luminosities are well-correlated with the luminosities in [OIII],5007 optical emission line. However, the luminosities of some AGNs deviate from this correlation. The fraction of these objects can be as high as 20%. In particular, the flux in [OIII] line turns to be lower in two nearby edge-on spiral galaxies, which can be explained by the extinction in their galactic disks.
  • We present the results of the photometric multicolor observations of GRB 060526 optical afterglow obtained with Russian-Turkish 1.5-m Telescope (RTT150, Mt. Bakirlitepe, Turkey). The detailed measurements of afterglow light curve, starting from about 5 hours after the GRB and during 5 consecutive nights were done. In addition, upper limits on the fast variability of the afterglow during the first night of observations were obtained and the history of afterglow color variations was measured in detail. In the time interval from 6 to 16 hours after the burst, there is a gradual flux decay, which can be described approximately as a power law with an index of -1.14+-0.02. After that the variability on the time scale \delta t < t is observed and the afterglow started to decay faster. The color of the afterglow, V-R=~0.5, is approximately the same during all our observations. The variability is detected on time scales up to \delta t/t =~ 0.0055 at \Delta F_\nu/F_\nu =~ 0.3, which violates some constraints on the variability of the observed emission from ultrarelativistic jet obtained by Ioka et al. (2005). We suggest to explain this variability by the fact that the motion of the emitting shell is no longer ultrarelativistic at this time.
  • Variability on time scales \delta t < t is observed in many gamma-ray burst afterglows. It is well known that there should be no such variability if the afterglow is emitted by external shock, which is produced by the interaction of ultrarelativistic ejecta with the ambient interstellar medium, within the framework of simple models. The corresponding constraints were established by Ioka et al. (2005) and in some cases are inconsistent with observations. On the other hand, if the motion is not relativistic, then the fast variability of the afterglow can be explained much more easily. In this connection we discuss various estimates of the time of the transition to subrelativistic motion in GRB source. We point out, that this transition should occur on an observed time scale of ~10 days. In the case of a higher density of the ambient interstellar medium ~10^2-10^4 cm^{-3} or dense stellar wind with \dot M ~ 10^{-5} - 10^{-4} M_\odot/year the transition to a subrelativistic motion can occur on a time scale of ~1 day. These densities may well be expected in star-forming regions and around massive Wolf-Rayet stars.
  • We present a catalog of galaxy clusters detected in a new ROSAT PSPC survey. The survey is optimized to sample, at high redshifts, the mass range corresponding to T> keV clusters at z=0. Technically, our survey is the extension of the 160 square degrees survey (Vikhlinin etal 98a, Mullis etal 2003). We use the same detection algorithm, thus preserving high quality of the resulting sample; the main difference is a significant increase in sky coverage. The new survey covers 397 square degrees and is based on 1610 high Galactic latitude ROSAT PSPC pointings, virtually all pointed ROSAT data suitable for the detection of distant clusters. The search volume for X-ray luminous clusters within z<1 exceeds that of the entire local Universe (z<0.1). We detected 287 extended X-ray sources with fluxes f>1.4e-13 erg/s/cm^2 in the 0.5-2 keV energy band, of which 266 (93%) are optically confirmed as galaxy clusters, groups or individual elliptical galaxies. This paper provides a description of the input data, the statistical calibration of the survey via Monte-Carlo simulations, and the catalog of detected clusters. We also compare the basic results to those from previous, smaller area surveys and find good agreement for the log N - log S distribution and the local X-ray luminosity function. Our sample clearly shows a decrease in the number density for the most luminous clusters at z>0.3. The comparison of our ROSAT-derived fluxes with the accurate Chandra measurements for a subset of high-redshift clusters demonstrates the validity of the 400 square degree survey's statistical calibration.
  • We present the first results of the observations of the extremely bright optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 030329 with the 1.5m Russian-Turkish telescope RTT150 (TUBITAK National Observatory, Bakyrlytepe, Turkey). RTT150 was one of the first 1.5m-class telescopes pointed to the afterglow. Observations were started approximately 6 hours after the burst. During the first 5 hours of our observations the afterglow faded exactly as a power law with index -1.19+-0.01 in each of the BVRI Bessel filters. After that, in all BVRI filters simultaneously we observe a steepening of the power law light curve. The power law decay index smoothly approaches the value ~= -1.9, observed by other observatories later. This power law break occurs at t-t_0 =0.57 days and lasts for +-0.1 days. We observe no variability above the gradual fading with the upper limits 10--1% on time scales 0.1--1000s. Spectral flux distribution in four BVRI filters corresponds to the power law spectrum with spectral index \alpha=0.66+-0.01. The change of the power law decay index in the end of our observations can be interpreted as a signature of collimated ultrarelativistic jet. The afterglow flux distribution in radio, optical and x-rays is consistent with synchrotron spectrum. We continue our observations of this unique object with RTT150.
  • We present a GRANAT/SIGMA observation of the soft gamma-ray afterglow immediately after GRB 920723. The main burst is very bright. After ~6 s, the burst light curve makes a smooth transition into an afterglow where flux decays as t^{-0.7}. The power-law decay lasts for at least 1000 s; beyond this time, the afterglow emission is lost in the background fluctuations. At least ~20% of main burst energy is emitted in the afterglow. At approximately ~6 s after the trigger, we also observe an abrupt change in the burst spectrum. At t<6 s, the ratio of 8-20 and 75-200 keV fluxes corresponds to the power law spectral index \alpha=0.0-0.3. At t=6 s, the value of \alpha increases to \alpha= ~1 and stays at this level afterwards. The observed afterglow characteristics are discussed in connection with the relativistic fireball model of gamma-ray bursts.
  • We search for angular correlation of gamma-ray bursts with cataloged quasars, BL Lac objects, and AGN using a large sample of relatively well-localized bursts detected by WATCH on board GRANAT and EURECA, IPN, and BATSE (327 bursts total). A statistically significant (99.99% confidence) correlation between GRB and M_B<-21 AGN in the redshift range 0.1<z<0.32 is found. The correlation with AGN is detected, with a lower significance, in three independent GRB datasets. The correlation amplitude implies that, depending on the AGN catalog completeness, 10% to 100% of bursts with peak fluxes in the range 3-30x10**-6 erg/s/cm^2 in the 100-500 keV band are physically related to AGN. The established distance scale corresponds to the energy release of order 10**52 ergs per burst.