• K. C. Chambers, E. A. Magnier, N. Metcalfe, H. A. Flewelling, M. E. Huber, C. Z. Waters, L. Denneau, P. W. Draper, D. Farrow, D. P. Finkbeiner, C. Holmberg, J. Koppenhoefer, P. A. Price, A. Rest, R. P. Saglia, E. F. Schlafly, S. J. Smartt, W. Sweeney, R. J. Wainscoat, W. S. Burgett, S. Chastel, T. Grav, J. N. Heasley, K. W. Hodapp, R. Jedicke, N. Kaiser, R.-P. Kudritzki, G. A. Luppino, R. H. Lupton, D. G. Monet, J. S. Morgan, P. M. Onaka, B. Shiao, C. W. Stubbs, J. L. Tonry, R. White, E. Bañados, E. F. Bell, R. Bender, E. J. Bernard, M. Boegner, F. Boffi, M. T. Botticella, A. Calamida, S. Casertano, W.-P. Chen, X. Chen, S. Cole, N. Deacon, C. Frenk, A. Fitzsimmons, S. Gezari, V. Gibbs, C. Goessl, T. Goggia, R. Gourgue, B. Goldman, P. Grant, E. K. Grebel, N.C. Hambly, G. Hasinger, A. F. Heavens, T. M. Heckman, R. Henderson, T. Henning, M. Holman, U. Hopp, W.-H. Ip, S. Isani, M. Jackson, C. D. Keyes, A. M. Koekemoer, R. Kotak, D. Le, D. Liska, K. S. Long, J. R. Lucey, M. Liu, N. F. Martin, G. Masci, B. McLean, E. Mindel, P. Misra, E. Morganson, D. N. A. Murphy, A. Obaika, G. Narayan, M. A. Nieto-Santisteban, P. Norberg, J. A. Peacock, E. A. Pier, M. Postman, N. Primak, C. Rae, A. Rai, A. Riess, A. Riffeser, H. W. Rix, S. Röser, R. Russel, L. Rutz, E. Schilbach, A. S. B. Schultz, D. Scolnic, L. Strolger, A. Szalay, S. Seitz, E. Small, K. W. Smith, D. R. Soderblom, P. Taylor, R. Thomson, A. N. Taylor, A. R. Thakar, J. Thiel, D. Thilker, D. Unger, Y. Urata, J. Valenti, J. Wagner, T. Walder, F. Walter, S. P. Watters, S. Werner, W. M. Wood-Vasey, R. Wyse
    Pan-STARRS1 has carried out a set of distinct synoptic imaging sky surveys including the $3\pi$ Steradian Survey and the Medium Deep Survey in 5 bands ($grizy_{P1}$). The mean 5$\sigma$ point source limiting sensitivities in the stacked 3$\pi$ Steradian Survey in $grizy_{P1}$ are (23.3, 23.2, 23.1, 22.3, 21.4) respectively. The upper bound on the systematic uncertainty in the photometric calibration across the sky is 7-12 millimag depending on the bandpass. The systematic uncertainty of the astrometric calibration using the Gaia frame comes from a comparison of the results with Gaia: the standard deviation of the mean and median residuals ($ \Delta ra, \Delta dec $) are (2.3, 1.7) milliarcsec, and (3.1, 4.8) milliarcsec respectively. The Pan-STARRS system and the design of the PS1 surveys are described and an overview of the resulting image and catalog data products and their basic characteristics are described together with a summary of important results. The images, reduced data products, and derived data products from the Pan-STARRS1 surveys are available to the community from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) at STScI.
  • Using integral field spectroscopy we investigate the kinematic properties of 35 massive centrally-dense and compact star-forming galaxies (${\log{\overline{M}_*}}=11.1$, $\log{(\Sigma_\mathrm{1kpc})}>9.5$, $\log{(M_\ast/r_e^{1.5})}>10.3$) at $z\sim0.7-3.7$ within the KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$survey. We spatially resolve 23 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and find that the majority are dominated by rotational motions with velocities ranging from {$95-500$ km s$^{-1}$}. The range of rotation velocities is reflected in a similar range of integrated H$\alpha$ linewidths, $75-400$ km s$^{-1}$, consistent with the kinematic properties of mass-matched extended galaxies from the full KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ sample. The fraction of compact SFGs that are classified as `rotation-dominated' or `disk-like' also mirrors the fractions of the full KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ sample. We show that integrated line-of-sight gas velocity dispersions from KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ are best approximated by a linear combination of their rotation and turbulent velocities with a lesser but still significant contribution from galactic scale winds. The H$\alpha$ exponential disk sizes of compact SFGs are on average $2.5\pm0.2$ kpc, $1-2\times$ the continuum sizes, in agreement with previous work. The compact SFGs have a $1.4\times$ higher AGN incidence than the full KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ sample at fixed stellar mass with average AGN fraction of 76\%. Given their high and centrally concentrated stellar masses as well as stellar to dynamical mass ratios close to unity, the compact SFGs are likely to have low molecular gas fractions and to quench on a short time scale unless replenished with inflowing gas. The rotation in these compact systems suggests that their direct descendants are rotating passive galaxies.
  • We investigate the stellar mass and baryonic mass Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs) of massive star-forming disk galaxies at redshift z~2.3 and z~0.9 as part of the KMOS^3D integral field spectroscopy survey. Our spatially resolved data allow reliable modelling of individual galaxies, including the effect of pressure support on the inferred gravitational potential. At fixed circular velocity, we find higher baryonic masses and similar stellar masses at z~2.3 as compared to z~0.9. Together with the decreasing gas-to-stellar mass ratios with decreasing redshift, this implies that the contribution of dark matter to the dynamical mass at the galaxy scale increases towards lower redshift. A comparison to local relations reveals a negative evolution of the stellar and baryonic TFR zero-points from z=0 to z~0.9, no evolution of the stellar TFR zero-point from z~0.9 to z~2.3, and a positive evolution of the baryonic TFR zero-point from z~0.9 to z~2.3. We discuss a toy model of disk galaxy evolution to explain the observed, non-monotonic TFR evolution, taking into account the empirically motivated redshift dependencies of galactic gas fractions, and of the relative amount of baryons to dark matter on galaxy and halo scales.
  • We exploit the deep resolved Halpha kinematic data from the KMOS^3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys to examine the largely unexplored outer disk kinematics of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) out to the peak of cosmic star formation. Our sample contains 101 SFGs representative of the more massive (9.3 < log(M*/Msun) < 11.5) main sequence population at 0.6<z<2.6. Through a novel stacking approach we are able to constrain a representative rotation curve extending out to ~4 effective radii. This average rotation curve exhibits a significant drop in rotation velocity beyond the turnover, with a slope of Delta(V)/Delta(R) = $-0.26^{+0.10}_{-0.09}$ in units of normalized coordinates V/V_max and R/R_turn. This result confirms that the fall-off seen previously in some individual galaxies is a common feature of our sample of high-z disks. We show that this outer fall-off strikingly deviates from the flat or mildly rising rotation curves of local spiral galaxies of similar masses. We furthermore compare our data with models including baryons and dark matter demonstrating that the falling stacked rotation curve can be explained by a high mass fraction of baryons relative to the total dark matter halo (m_d>~0.05) in combination with a sizeable level of pressure support in the outer disk. These findings are in agreement with recent studies demonstrating that star-forming disks at high redshift are strongly baryon dominated within the disk scale, and furthermore suggest that pressure gradients caused by large turbulent gas motions are present even in their outer disks. We demonstrate that these results are largely independent of our model assumptions such as the presence of a central stellar bulge, the effect of adiabatic contraction at fixed m_d, and variations in the concentration parameter.
  • In cold dark matter cosmology, the baryonic components of galaxies are thought to be mixed with and embedded in non-baryonic and non-relativistic dark matter, which dominates the total mass of the galaxy and its dark matter halo. In the local Universe, the mass of dark matter within a galactic disk increases with disk radius, becoming appreciable and then dominant in the outer, baryonic regions of the disks of star-forming galaxies. This results in rotation velocities of the visible matter within the disk that are constant or increasing with disk radius. Comparison between the dynamical mass and the sum of stellar and cold gas mass at the peak epoch of galaxy formation, inferred from ancillary data, suggest high baryon factions in the inner, star-forming regions of the disks. Although this implied baryon fraction may be larger than in the local Universe, the systematic uncertainties (stellar initial mass function, calibration of gas masses) render such comparisons inconclusive in terms of the mass of dark matter. Here we report rotation curves for the outer disks of six massive star-forming galaxies, and find that the rotation velocities are not constant, but decrease with radius. We propose that this trend arises because of two main factors: first, a large fraction of the massive, high-redshift galaxy population was strongly baryon dominated, with dark matter playing a smaller part than in the local Universe; and second, the large velocity dispersion in high-redshift disks introduces a substantial pressure term that leads to a decrease in rotation velocity with increasing radius. The effect of both factors appears to increase with redshift. Qualitatively, the observations suggest that baryons in the early Universe efficiently condensed at the centres of dark matter halos when gas fractions were high, and dark matter was less concentrated. [Abridged]
  • We make publicly available a catalog of calibrated environmental measures for galaxies in the five 3D-HST/CANDELS deep fields. Leveraging the spectroscopic and grism redshifts from the 3D-HST survey, multi wavelength photometry from CANDELS, and wider field public data for edge corrections, we derive densities in fixed apertures to characterize the environment of galaxies brighter than $JH_{140} < 24$ mag in the redshift range $0.5<z<3.0$. By linking observed galaxies to a mock sample, selected to reproduce the 3D-HST sample selection and redshift accuracy, each 3D-HST galaxy is assigned a probability density function of the host halo mass, and a probability that is a central or a satellite galaxy. The same procedure is applied to a $z=0$ sample selected from SDSS. We compute the fraction of passive central and satellite galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass, and redshift, and then derive the fraction of galaxies that were quenched by environment specific processes. Using the mock sample, we estimate that the timescale for satellite quenching is $t_{\rm quench} \sim 2-5$ Gyr; longer at lower stellar mass or lower redshift, but remarkably independent of halo mass. This indicates that, in the range of environments commonly found within the 3D-HST sample, satellites are quenched by exhaustion of their gas reservoir in absence of cosmological accretion. We find that the quenching times can be separated into a delay phase during which satellite galaxies behave similarly to centrals at fixed stellar mass, and a phase where the star formation rate drops rapidly ($\sim 0.4-0.6$ Gyr), as shown previously at $z=0$. We conclude that this scenario requires satellite galaxies to retain a large reservoir of multi-phase gas upon accretion, even at high redshift, and that this gas sustains star formation for the long quenching times observed.
  • We study the evolution of spectral early-type galaxies in clusters, groups and the field up to redshift 0.9 using the EDisCS dataset. We measure Re, Ie, and sigma for 154 cluster and 68 field galaxies. We study the evolution of the zero point of the fundamental plane (FP) and confirm results in the literature, but now also for the low cluster velocity dispersion regime. The mass-to-light ratio varies as Delta log M/L_B=(-0.54+-0.01)z=(-1.61+-0.01)log(1+z) in clusters, independent of their velocity dispersion. The evolution is stronger (Delta log M/L_B=(-0.76+-0.01)z=(-2.27+-0.03)log(1+z)) for field galaxies. The FP residuals correlate with galaxy mass and become progressively negative at low masses. The effect is visible at z>=0.7 for cluster galaxies and at z>=0.5 for field galaxies. We investigate the size evolution of our galaxy sample. We find that the half-luminosity radius for a galaxy with a dynamical or stellar mass of 2x10^11 Msol varies as (1+z)^{-1.0+-0.3} for both cluster and field galaxies. At the same time, stellar velocity dispersions grow with redshift, as (1+z)^{0.59+-0.10} at constant dynamical mass, and as (1+z)^{0.34+- 0.14} at constant stellar mass. The measured size evolution reduces to Re (1+z)^{-0.5+- 0.2} and sigma (1+z)^{0.41+-0.08}, at fixed dynamical masses, and Re (1+z)^{-0.68+-0.4} and sigma (1+z)^{0.19+-0.10}, at fixed stellar masses, when the progenitor bias (galaxies that locally are of spectroscopic early-type, but not very old, disappear from the EDisCS high-redshift sample; these galaxies tend to be large in size) is taken into account. Taken together, the variations in size and velocity dispersion imply that the luminosity evolution with redshift derived from the zero point of the FP is somewhat milder than that derived without taking these variations into account.
  • We exploit deep integral-field spectroscopic observations with KMOS/VLT of 240 star-forming disks at 0.6 < z < 2.6 to dynamically constrain their mass budget. Our sample consists of massive ($\gtrsim 10^{9.8} M_\odot$) galaxies with sizes $R_e \gtrsim 2$ kpc. By contrasting the observed velocity and dispersion profiles to dynamical models, we find that on average the stellar content contributes $32^{+8}_{-7}\%$ of the total dynamical mass, with a significant spread among galaxies (68th percentile range f_star ~ 18 - 62%). Including molecular gas as inferred from CO- and dust-based scaling relations, the estimated baryonic mass adds up to $56^{+17}_{-12}\%$ of total for the typical galaxy in our sample, reaching ~ 90% at z > 2. We conclude that baryons make up most of the mass within the disk regions of high-redshift star-forming disk galaxies, with typical disks at z > 2 being strongly baryon-dominated within $R_e$. Substantial object-to-object variations in both stellar and baryonic mass fractions are observed among the galaxies in our sample, larger than what can be accounted for by the formal uncertainties in their respective measurements. In both cases, the mass fractions correlate most strongly with measures of surface density. High $\Sigma_{star}$ galaxies feature stellar mass fractions closer to unity, and systems with high inferred gas or baryonic surface densities leave less room for additional mass components other than stars and molecular gas. Our findings can be interpreted as more extended disks probing further (and more compact disks probing less far) into the dark matter halos that host them.
  • MICADO will equip the E-ELT with a first light capability for diffraction limited imaging at near-infrared wavelengths. The instrument's observing modes focus on various flavours of imaging, including astrometric, high contrast, and time resolved. There is also a single object spectroscopic mode optimised for wavelength coverage at moderately high resolution. This contribution provides an overview of the key functionality of the instrument, outlining the scientific rationale for its observing modes. The interface between MICADO and the adaptive optics system MAORY that feeds it is summarised. The design of the instrument is discussed, focussing on the optics and mechanisms inside the cryostat, together with a brief overview of the other key sub-systems.
  • We analyze the angular momenta of massive star forming galaxies (SFGs) at the peak of the cosmic star formation epoch (z~0.8-2.6). Our sample of ~360 log(M*/Msun) ~ 9.3-11.8 SFGs is mainly based on the KMOS3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys of H$\alpha$ kinematics, and collectively provides a representative subset of the massive star forming population. The inferred halo scale angular momentum distribution is broadly consistent with that theoretically predicted for their dark matter halos, in terms of mean spin parameter <$\lambda$> ~ 0.037 and its dispersion ($\sigma_{log(\lambda)}$~0.2). Spin parameters correlate with the disk radial scale, and with their stellar surface density, but do not depend significantly on halo mass, stellar mass, or redshift. Our data thus support the long-standing assumption that on average, even at high redshifts, the specific angular momentum of disk galaxies reflects that of their dark matter halos (j_d = j_DM). The lack of correlation between $\lambda$ x (j_d/j_DM) and the nuclear stellar density $\Sigma_{*}$(1kpc) favors a scenario where disk-internal angular momentum redistribution leads to "compaction" inside massive high-redshift disks. For our sample, the inferred average stellar-to-dark matter mass ratio is ~2%, consistent with abundance matching results. Including the molecular gas, the total baryonic disk-to-dark matter mass ratio is ~5% for halos near $10^{12}$ Msun, which corresponds to 31% of the cosmologically available baryons, implying that high-redshift disks are strongly baryon dominated.
  • We investigate the correlations between the black hole mass $M_{BH}$, the velocity dispersion $\sigma$, the bulge mass $M_{Bu}$, the bulge average spherical density $\rho_h$ and its spherical half mass radius $r_h$, constructing a database of 97 galaxies (31 core ellipticals, 17 power-law ellipticals, 30 classical bulges, 19 pseudo bulges) by joining 72 galaxies from the literature to 25 galaxies observed during our recent SINFONI black hole survey. For the first time we discuss the full error covariance matrix. We analyse the well known $M_{BH}-\sigma$ and $M_{BH}-M_{Bu}$ relations and establish the existence of statistically significant correlations between $M_{Bu}$ and $r_h$ and anti-correlations between $M_{Bu}$ and $\rho_h$. We establish five significant bivariate correlations ($M_{BH}-\sigma-\rho_h$, $M_{BH}-\sigma-r_h$, $M_{BH}-M_{Bu}-\sigma$, $M_{BH}-M_{Bu}-\rho_h$, $M_{BH}-M_{Bu}-r_h$) that predict $M_{BH}$ of 77 core and power-law ellipticals and classical bulges with measured and intrinsic scatter as small as $\approx 0.36$ dex and $\approx 0.33$ dex respectively, or 0.26 dex when the subsample of 45 galaxies defined by Kormendy and Ho (2013) is considered. In contrast, pseudo bulges have systematically lower $M_{BH}$, but approach the predictions of all the above relations at spherical densities $\rho_h\ge 10^{10} M_\odot/kpc^3$ or scale lengths $r_h\le 1$ kpc. These findings fit in a scenario of co-evolution of BH and classical-bulge masses, where core ellipticals are the product of dry mergers of power-law bulges and power-law Es and bulges the result of (early) gas-rich mergers and of disk galaxies. In contrast, the (secular) growth of BHs is decoupled from the growth of their pseudo bulge hosts, except when (gas) densities are high enough to trigger the feedback mechanism responsible for the existence of the correlations between $M_{BH}$ and galaxy structural parameters.
  • The Pan-Planets survey observed an area of 42 sq deg. in the galactic disk for about 165 hours. The main scientific goal of the project is the detection of transiting planets around M dwarfs. We establish an efficient procedure for determining the stellar parameters $T_{eff}$ and log$g$ of all sources using a method based on SED fitting, utilizing a three-dimensional dust map and proper motion information. In this way we identify more than 60000 M dwarfs, which is by far the largest sample of low-mass stars observed in a transit survey to date. We present several planet candidates around M dwarfs and hotter stars that are currently being followed up. Using Monte-Carlo simulations we calculate the detection efficiency of the Pan-Planets survey for different stellar and planetary populations. We expect to find $3.0^{+3.3}_{-1.6}$ hot Jupiters around F, G, and K dwarfs with periods lower than 10 days based on the planet occurrence rates derived in previous surveys. For M dwarfs, the percentage of stars with a hot Jupiter is under debate. Theoretical models expect a lower occurrence rate than for larger main sequence stars. However, radial velocity surveys find upper limits of about 1\% due to their small sample, while the Kepler survey finds a occurrence rate that we estimate to be at least $0.17(^{+0.67}_{-0.04})$%, making it even higher than the determined fraction from OGLE-III for F, G and K stellar types, $0.14(^{+0.15}_{-0.076})\%$. With the large sample size of Pan-Planets, we are able to determine an occurrence rate of $0.11(^{+0.37}_{-0.02})$% in case one of our candidates turns out to be a real detection. If, however, none of our candidates turn out to be true planets, we are able to put an upper limit of 0.34% with a 95% confidence on the hot Jupiter occurrence rate of M dwarfs. Therefore we cannot yet confirm the theoretical prediction of a lower occurrence rate for cool stars.
  • [Abbreviated] We search for scaling relations between the fundamental AGN parameters and rest-frame UV/optical variability properties for a sample of $\sim$90 X-ray selected AGNs covering a wide redshift range from the XMM-COSMOS survey, with optical light curves in four bands provided by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field 04 survey. To estimate the variability amplitude we utilize the normalized excess variance ($\sigma_{\mathrm{rms}}^{2}$) and probe variability on rest-frame timescales of several months and years by calculating $\sigma_{\mathrm{rms}}^{2}$ from different parts of our light curves. In addition, we derive the rest-frame optical PSD for our sources using continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models. We observe that the excess variance and the PSD amplitude are strongly anti-correlated with wavelength, bolometric luminosity and Eddington ratio. There is no evidence for a dependency of the variability amplitude on black hole mass and redshift. These results suggest that the accretion rate is the fundamental physical quantity determining the rest-frame UV/optical variability amplitude of quasars on timescales of months and years. The optical PSD of all of our sources is consistent with a broken power law showing a characteristic bend at rest-frame timescales ranging between $\sim$100 and $\sim$300 days. The break timescale exhibits no significant correlation with any of the fundamental AGN parameters. The low frequency slope of the PSD is consistent with a value of $-1$ for most of our objects, whereas the high frequency slope is characterized by a broad distribution of values between $\sim-2$ and $\sim-4$. These findings unveil significant deviations from the simple "damped random walk" model, frequently used in previous optical variability studies. We find a weak tendency for AGNs with higher black hole mass having steeper high frequency PSD slopes.
  • [Abbreviated] Upcoming large area sky surveys like EUCLID and eROSITA crucially depend on accurate photometric redshifts (photo-z). The identification of variable sources, such as AGNs, and the achievable redshift accuracy for varying objects are important in view of the science goals of the EUCLID and eROSITA missions. We probe AGN optical variability for a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs in the XMM-COSMOS field, using the light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3pi and MDF04 surveys. Utilizing two different variability parameters, we defined a sample of varying AGNs for every PS1 band. We investigated the influence of variability on the calculation of photo-z by applying three different input photometry sets for our fitting procedure. For each of the five PS1 bands, we chose either the epochs minimizing the interval in observing time, the median magnitude values, or randomly drawn light curve points to compute the redshift. In addition, we derived photo-z using PS1 photometry extended by GALEX/IRAC bands. We find that the photometry produced by the 3pi survey is sufficient to reliably detect variable sources provided that the fractional variability amplitude is at least 3%. Considering the photo-z of variable AGNs, we observe that minimizing the time spacing of the chosen points yields superior photo-z in terms of the percentage of outliers (33%) and accuracy (0.07), outperforming the other two approaches. Drawing random points from the light curve gives rise to typically 57% of outliers and an accuracy of 0.4. Adding GALEX/IRAC bands for the redshift determination weakens the influence of variability. Although the redshift quality generally improves when adding these bands, we still obtain not less than 26% of outliers and an accuracy of 0.05 at best, therefore variable sources should receive a flag stating that their photo-z may be low quality.
  • We construct a set of model spectra specifically designed to match the colours of the BOSS CMASS galaxies and to be used with photometric redshift template fitting techniques. As a basis we use a set of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of single and composite stellar population models. These models cannot describe well the whole colour range populated by the CMASS galaxies at all redshifts, wherefore we modify them by multiplying the SEDs with $\lambda^{-\beta}$ for $\lambda>\lambda_i$ for different values of $\lambda_i$ and $\beta$. When fitting these SEDs to the colours of the CMASS sample, with a burst and dust components in superposition, we can recreate the location in colour spaces inhabited by the CMASS galaxies. From the best fitting models we select a small subset in a two-dimensional plane, whereto the galaxies were mapped by a self-organizing map. These models are used for the estimation of photometric redshifts with a Bayesian template fitting code. The photometric redshifts with the novel templates have a very small outlier rate of $0.22\,\%$, a low bias $\langle\Delta z/(1+z)\rangle=2.0\cdot10^{-3}$, and scatter of $\sigma_{68}=0.026$ in the restframe. Using our models, the galaxy colours are reproduced to a better extent with the photometric redshifts of this work than with photometric redshifts of SDSS.
  • We present the KMOS^3D survey, a new integral field survey of over 600 galaxies at 0.7<z<2.7 using KMOS at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The KMOS^3D survey utilizes synergies with multi-wavelength ground and space-based surveys to trace the evolution of spatially-resolved kinematics and star formation from a homogeneous sample over 5 Gyrs of cosmic history. Targets, drawn from a mass-selected parent sample from the 3D-HST survey, cover the star formation-stellar mass ($M_*$) and rest-frame $(U-V)-M_*$ planes uniformly. We describe the selection of targets, the observations, and the data reduction. In the first year of data we detect Halpha emission in 191 $M_*=3\times10^{9}-7\times10^{11}$ Msun galaxies at z=0.7-1.1 and z=1.9-2.7. In the current sample 83% of the resolved galaxies are rotation-dominated, determined from a continuous velocity gradient and $v_{rot}/\sigma>1$, implying that the star-forming 'main sequence' (MS) is primarily composed of rotating galaxies at both redshift regimes. When considering additional stricter criteria, the Halpha kinematic maps indicate at least ~70% of the resolved galaxies are disk-like systems. Our high-quality KMOS data confirm the elevated velocity dispersions reported in previous IFS studies at z>0.7. For rotation-dominated disks, the average intrinsic velocity dispersion decreases by a factor of two from 50 km/s at z~2.3 to 25 km/s at z~0.9 while the rotational velocities at the two redshifts are comparable. Combined with existing results spanning z~0-3, disk velocity dispersions follow an approximate (1+z) evolution that is consistent with the dependence of velocity dispersion on gas fractions predicted by marginally-stable disk theory.
  • The goal of this work is to conduct a photometric study of eclipsing binaries in M31. We apply a modified box-fitting algorithm to search for eclipsing binary candidates and determine their period. We classify these candidates into detached, semi-detached, and contact systems using the Fourier decomposition method. We cross-match the position of our detached candidates with the photometry from Local Group Survey (Massey et al. 2006) and select 13 candidates brighter than 20.5 magnitude in V. The relative physical parameters of these detached candidates are further characterized with Detached Eclipsing Binary Light curve fitter (DEBiL) by Devor (2005). We will followup the detached eclipsing binaries spectroscopically and determine the distance to M31.
  • In this paper we follow up on our previous detection of nuclear ionized outflows in the most massive (log(M*/Msun) >= 10.9) z~1-3 star-forming galaxies (Forster Schreiber et al.), by increasing the sample size by a factor of six (to 44 galaxies above log(M*/Msun) >= 10.9) from a combination of the SINS/zC-SINF, LUCI, GNIRS, and KMOS^3D spectroscopic surveys. We find a fairly sharp onset of the incidence of broad nuclear emission (FWHM in the Ha, [NII], and [SII] lines ~ 450-5300 km/s), with large [NII]/Ha ratios, above log(M*/Msun) ~ 10.9, with about two thirds of the galaxies in this mass range exhibiting this component. Broad nuclear components near and above the Schechter mass are similarly prevalent above and below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies, and at z~1 and ~2. The line ratios of the nuclear component are fit by excitation from active galactic nuclei (AGN), or by a combination of shocks and photoionization. The incidence of the most massive galaxies with broad nuclear components is at least as large as that of AGNs identified by X-ray, optical, infrared or radio indicators. The mass loading of the nuclear outflows is near unity. Our findings provide compelling evidence for powerful, high-duty cycle, AGN-driven outflows near the Schechter mass, and acting across the peak of cosmic galaxy formation.
  • We present the weak lensing analysis of the Wide-Field Imager SZ Cluster of galaxy (WISCy) sample, a set of 12 clusters of galaxies selected for their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. After developing new and improved methods for background selection and determination of geometric lensing scaling factors from absolute multi-band photometry in cluster fields, we compare the weak lensing mass estimate with public X-ray and SZ data. We find consistency with hydrostatic X-ray masses with no significant bias, no mass dependent bias and less than 20% intrinsic scatter and constrain fgas,500c=0.128+0.029-0.023. We independently calibrate the South Pole Telescope significance-mass relation and find consistency with previous results. The comparison of weak lensing mass and Planck Compton parameters, whether extracted self-consistently with a mass-observable relation (MOR) or using X-ray prior information on cluster size, shows significant discrepancies. The deviations from the MOR strongly correlate with cluster mass and redshift. This could be explained either by a significantly shallower than expected slope of Compton decrement versus mass and a corresponding problem in the previous X-ray based mass calibration, or a size or redshift dependent bias in SZ signal extraction.
  • We perform a study on the optical and infrared photometric properties of known luminous blue variables (LBVs) in M31 using the sample of LBV candidates from the Local Group Galaxy Survey (Massey et al. 2007). We find that M31 LBV candidates show photometric variability ranging from 0.375 to 1.576 magnitudes in rP1 during a three year time-span observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 Andromeda survey (PAndromeda). Their near-infrared colors also follow the distribution of Galactic LBVs as shown by Oksala et al. (2013). We use these features as selection criteria to search for unknown LBV candidates in M31. We thus devise a method to search for candidate LBVs using both optical color from the Local Group Galaxy Survey and infrared color from Two Micron All Sky Survey, as well as photometric variations observed by PAndromeda. We find four sources exhibiting common properties of known LBVs. These sources also exhibit UV emission as seen from GALEX, which is one of the previously adopted method to search for LBV candidates. The locations of the LBVs are well aligned withM31 spiral arms as seen in the UV light, suggesting they are evolved stars at young age given their high-mass nature. We compare these candidates with the latest Geneva evolutionary tracks, which show that our new M31 LBV candidates are massive evolved stars with an age of 10 to 100 million years.
  • The most massive elliptical galaxies have low-density centers or cores that differ dramatically from the high-density centers of less massive ellipticals and bulges of disk galaxies. These cores have been interpreted as the result of mergers of supermassive black hole binaries, which depopulate galaxy centers by gravitationally slingshotting central stars toward large radii. Such binaries naturally form in mergers of luminous galaxies. Here, we analyze the population of central stellar orbits in 11 massive elliptical galaxies that we observed with the integral field spectrograph SINFONI at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. Our dynamical analysis is orbit-based and includes the effects of a central black hole, the mass distribution of the stars, and a dark matter halo. We show that the use of integral field kinematics and the inclusion of dark matter is important to conclude upon the distribution of stellar orbits in galaxy centers. Six of our galaxies are core galaxies. In these six galaxies, but not in the galaxies without cores, we detect a coherent lack of stars on radial orbits in the core region and a uniform excess of radial orbits outside of it: when scaled by the core radius, the radial profiles of the classical anisotropy parameter beta are nearly identical in core galaxies. Moreover, they match quantitatively the predictions of black hole binary simulations, providing the first convincing dynamical evidence for core scouring in the most massive elliptical galaxies.
  • We present an analysis of the H2 emission-line gas kinematics in the inner < 4 arcsec radius of six nearby spiral galaxies, based on AO-assisted integral-field observations obtained in the K-band with SINFONI/VLT. Four of the six galaxies in our sample display ordered H2 velocity fields, consistent with gas moving in the plane of the galaxy and rotating in the same direction as the stars. However, the gas kinematics is typically far from simple circular motion. We can classify the observed velocity fields into four different types of flows, ordered by increasing complexity: (1) circular motion in a disc (NGC3351); (2) oval motion in the galaxy plane (NGC3627 and NGC4536); (3) streaming motion superimposed on circular rotation (NGC4501); and (4) disordered streaming motions (NGC4569 and NGC4579). The H2 velocity dispersion in the galaxies is usually higher than 50 km/s in the inner 1-2 arcsec radii. The four galaxies with ordered kinematics have v/sigma < 1 at radii less than 40-80 pc. The radius at which v/sigma = 1 is independent of the type of nuclear activity. While the low values of v/sigma could be taken as an indication of a thick disc in the innermost regions of the galaxies, other lines of evidence (e.g. H2 morphologies and velocity fields) argue for a thin disc interpretation in the case of NGC3351 and NGC4536. We discuss the implications of the high values of velocity dispersion for the dynamics of the gaseous disc and suggest caution when interpreting the velocity dispersion of ionized and warm tracers as being entirely dynamical. Understanding the nature and role of the velocity dispersion in the gas dynamics, together with the full 2D information of the gas, is essential for obtaining accurate black hole masses from gas kinematics.
  • Shallow cores in bright, massive galaxies are commonly thought to be the result of scouring of stars by mergers of binary supermassive black holes. Past investigations have suggested correlations between the central black hole mass and the stellar light or mass deficit in the core, using proxy measurements of $M_{\rm BH}$ or stellar mass-to-light ratios ($\Upsilon$). Drawing on a wealth of dynamical models which provide both $M_{\rm BH}$ and $\Upsilon$, we identify cores in 23 galaxies, of which 20 have direct, reliable measurements of $M_{\rm BH}$ and dynamical stellar mass-to-light ratios ($\Upsilon_{\star,{\rm dyn}}$). These cores are identified and measured using Core-S\'ersic model fits to surface brightness profiles which extend out to large radii (typically more than the effective radius of the galaxy); for approximately one fourth of the galaxies, the best fit includes an outer (\sersic) envelope component. We find that the core radius is most strongly correlated with the black hole mass and that it correlates better with total galaxy luminosity than it does with velocity dispersion. The strong core-size-- $M_{\rm BH}$ correlation enables estimation of black hole masses (in core galaxies) with an accuracy comparable to the $M_{\rm BH}$--$\sigma$ relation (rms scatter of 0.30 dex in $\log M_{\rm BH}$), without the need for spectroscopy. The light and mass deficits correlate more strongly with galaxy velocity dispersion than they do with black hole mass. Stellar mass deficits span a range of 0.2--39 \mbh, with almost all (87%) being $< 10 \, M_{\rm BH}$; the median value is 2.2 $M_{\rm BH}$.
  • We present a sample of M31 beat Cepheids from the Pan-STARRS 1 PAndromeda campaign. By analyzing three years of PAndromeda data, we identify seventeen beat Cepheids, spreading from a galactocentric distance of 10 to 16 kpc. Since the relation between fundamental mode period and the ratio of fundamental to the first overtone period puts a tight constraint on metallicity we are able to derive the metallicity at the position of the beat Cepheids using the relations from the model of Buchler (2008). Our metallicity estimates show subsolar values within 15 kpc, similar to the metallicities from HII regions (Zurita & Bresolin 2012). We then use the metallicity estimates to calculate the metallicity gradient of the M31 disk, which we find to be closer to the metallicity gradient derived from planetary nebulae (Kwitter et al. 2012) than the metallicity gradient from HII regions (Zurita & Bresolin 2012).
  • We describe the pre-OmegaTranS project, a deep survey for transiting extra-solar planets in the Carina region of the Galactic Disk. In 2006-2008 we observed a single dense stellar field with a very high cadence of ~2min using the ESO Wide Field Imager at the La Silla Observatory. Using the Astronomical Wide-field System for Europe and the Munich Difference Imaging Analysis pipeline, a module that has been developed for this project, we created the light curves of 16000 stars with more than 4000 data points which we searched for periodic transit signals using a box-fitting least-squares detection algorithm. All light curves are publicly available. In the course of the pre-OmegaTranS project we identified two planet candidates - POTS-1b and POTS-C2b - which we present in this work. With extensive follow-up observations we were able to confirm one of them, POTS-1b, a hot Jupiter transiting a mid-K dwarf. The planet has a mass of 2.31+-0.77M_Jup and a radius of 0.94+-0.04R_Jup and a period of P=3.16d. The host star POTS-1 has a radius of 0.59+-0.02R_Sun and a mass of 0.70+-0.05M_Sun. Due to its low apparent brightness of I=16.1mag the follow-up and confirmation of POTS-1b was particularly challenging and costly.