• We present results from the commissioning and early science programs of FIDEOS, the new high-resolution echelle spectrograph developed at the Centre of Astro Engineering of Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, and recently installed at the ESO 1m telescope of La Silla. The instrument provides spectral resolution R = 43,000 in the visible spectral range 420-800 nm, reaching a limiting magnitude of 11 in V band. Precision in the measurement of radial velocity is guaranteed by light feeding with an octagonal optical fibre, suitable mechanical isolation, thermal stabilisation, and simultaneous wavelength calibration. Currently the instrument reaches radial velocity stability of = 8 m/s over several consecutive nights of observation.
  • We report the discovery of four transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey: HATS-39b, HATS-40b, HATS41b and HATS-42b. These discoveries add to the growing number of transiting planets orbiting moderately bright (12.5 < V < 13.7) F dwarf stars on short (2-5 day) periods. The planets have similar radii, ranging from 1.33(+0.29/-0.20) R_J for HATS-41b to 1.58(+0.16/-0.12) R_J for HATS-40b. Their masses and bulk densities, however, span more than an order of magnitude. HATS-39b has a mass of 0.63 +/- 0.13 M_J, and an inflated radius of 1.57 +/- 0.12 R_J, making it a good target for future transmission spectroscopic studies. HATS-41b is a very massive 9.7 +/- 1.6 M_J planet and one of only a few hot Jupiters found to date with a mass over 5 M_J. This planet orbits the highest metallicity star ([Fe/H] = 0.470 +/- 0.010) known to host a transiting planet and is also likely on an eccentric orbit. The high mass, coupled with a relatively young age (1.34 +0.31/-0.51 Gyr) for the host star, are factors that may explain why this planet's orbit has not yet circularised.
  • We report the discovery of two hot Jupiters orbiting the stars EPIC229426032 and EPIC246067459. We used photometry data from Campaign 11 and 12 of the Kepler (K2) Mission, as well as radial velocity data obtained using the HARPS, FEROS, and CORALIE spectrographs. EPIC229426032 b and EPIC246067459 b have masses of $1.36^{+0.10}_{-0.10}$ and $0.86^{+0.13}_{-0.12}\,R_{\mathrm{Jup}}$, radii of $1.63^{+0.07}_{-0.08}$ and $1.30^{+0.15}_{-0.14}\,M_{\mathrm{Jup}}$, and are orbiting their host stars in 2.18 and 3.2 day orbits, respectively. The large radius of EPIC229426032 b leads us to conclude that this corresponds to a highly inflated hot Jupiter. EPIC2460674559 b has a radius consistent with theoretical models, considering the high incident flux falling on the planet. Both of these discoveries represent excellent laboratories to study the physics of planetary atmospheres, and the factors playing a role in planetary infation, as well as planet formation and evolution. EPIC229426032 b is particularly favourable for follow-up studies, since not only is it very inflated, but it also orbits a relatively bright star ($V = 11.6$).
  • We report the discovery of four close-in transiting exoplanets, HATS-50 through HATS-53, discovered using the HATSouth three-continent network of homogeneous and automated telescopes. These new exoplanets belong to the class of hot Jupiters and orbit G-type dwarf stars, with brightness in the range V=12.5-14.0 mag. While HATS-53 has many physical characteristics similar to the Sun, the other three stars appear to be metal rich, larger and more massive. Three of the new exoplanets, namely HATS-50, HATS-51 and HATS-53, have low density and similar orbital period. Instead, HATS-52 is more dense and has a shorter orbital period. It also receives an intensive radiation from its parent star and, consequently, presents a high equilibrium temperature. HATS-50 shows a marginal additional transit feature consistent with an ultra-short period hot super Neptune, which will be able to be confirmed with TESS photometry.
  • We report the discovery of four short period extrasolar planets transiting moderately bright stars from photometric measurements of the HATSouth network coupled to additional spectroscopic and photometric follow-up observations. While the planet masses range from 0.26 to 0.90 M$_J$, the radii are all approximately a Jupiter radii, resulting in a wide range of bulk densities. The orbital period of the planets range from 2.7d to 4.7d, with HATS-43b having an orbit that appears to be marginally non-circular (e= 0.173$\pm$0.089). HATS-44 is notable for a high metallicity ([Fe/H]= 0.320$\pm$0.071). The host stars spectral types range from late F to early K, and all of them are moderately bright (13.3<V<14.4), allowing the execution of future detailed follow-up observations. HATS-43b and HATS-46b, with expected transmission signals of 2350 ppm and 1500 ppm, respectively, are particularly well suited targets for atmospheric characterisation via transmission spectroscopy.
  • Although the majority of radial velocity detected planets have been found orbiting solar-type stars, a fraction of them have been discovered around giant stars. These planetary systems have revealed different orbital properties when compared to solar-type stars companions. In particular, radial velocity surveys have shown that there is a lack of giant planets in close-in orbits around giant stars, in contrast to the known population of hot-Jupiters orbiting solar-type stars. The reason of this distinctive feature in the semimajor-axis distribution has been theorized to be the result of the stellar evolution and/or due to the effect of a different formation/evolution scenario for planets around intermediate-mass stars. However, in the past few years, a handful of transiting short-period planets (P$\lesssim$ 10 days) have been found around giant stars, thanks to the high precision photometric data obtained initially by the Kepler mission, and later by its two-wheels extension K2. These new discoveries, have allowed us for the first time to study the orbital properties and physical parameters of these intriguing and elusive sub-stellar companions. In this paper we report on an independent discovery of a transiting planet in field 10 of the K2 mission, also reported recently by Grunblatt et al. (2017). The main orbital parameters of EPIC\,228754001\,$b$, obtained with all the available data for the system, are the following: $P$ = 9.1708 $\pm$ 0.0025 $d$, $e$ = 0.290 $\pm$ 0.049, Mp = 0.495 $\pm$ 0.007 Mjup \,and Rp = 1.089 $\pm$ 0.006 Rjup. This is the fifth known planet orbiting any giant star with $a < 0.1$, and the most eccentric one among them, making EPIC\,228754001\,$b$ a very interesting object.
  • We present the discovery of EPIC 228735255b, a P= 6.57 days Jupiter-mass (M$_P$=1.019$\pm$0.070 M$_{Jup}$) planet transiting a V=12.5 (G5-spectral type) star in an eccentric orbit (e=$0.120^{+0.056}_{-0.046}$) detected using a combination of K2 photometry and ground-based observations. With a radius of 1.095$\pm$0.018R$_{Jup}$ the planet has a bulk density of 0.726$\pm$0.062$\rho_{Jup}$. The host star has a [Fe/H] of 0.12$\pm$0.045, and from the K2 light curve we find a rotation period for the star of 16.3$\pm$0.1 days. This discovery is the 9th hot Jupiter from K2 and highlights K2's ability to detect transiting giant planets at periods slightly longer than traditional, ground-based surveys. This planet is slightly inflated, but much less than others with similar incident fluxes. These are of interest for investigating the inflation mechanism of hot Jupiters.
  • We report on the result of a campaign to monitor 25 HATSouth candidates using the K2 space telescope during Campaign 7 of the K2 mission. We discover HATS-36b (EPIC 215969174b), a hot Jupiter with a mass of 2.79$\pm$0.40 M$_J$ and a radius of 1.263$\pm$0.045 R$_J$ which transits a solar-type G0V star (V=14.386) in a 4.1752d period. We also refine the properties of three previously discovered HATSouth transiting planets (HATS-9b, HATS-11b, and HATS-12b) and search the K2 data for TTVs and additional transiting planets in these systems. In addition we also report on a further three systems that remain as Jupiter-radius transiting exoplanet candidates. These candidates do not have determined masses, however pass all of our other vetting observations. Finally we report on the 18 candidates which we are now able to classify as eclipsing binary or blended eclipsing binary systems based on a combination of the HATSouth data, the K2 data, and follow-up ground-based photometry and spectroscopy. These range in periods from 0.7 days to 16.7 days, and down to 1.5 mmag in eclipse depths. Our results show the power of combining ground-based imaging and spectroscopy with higher precision space-based photometry, and serve as an illustration as to what will be possible when combining ground-based observations with TESS data.
  • We briefly present the spectroscopic evolution of the recent outburst of the classical nova V1369 Cen, and the presence of a narrow absorption line identified as due to the resonance of neutral lithium at 6708 \AA. We also discuss the consequences for the chemical evolution of lithium in the Galaxy.
  • We report the discovery of a substellar companion around the giant star HIP67537. Based on precision radial velocity measurements from CHIRON and FEROS high-resolution spectroscopic data, we derived the following orbital elements for HIP67537$\,b$: m$_b$sin$i$ = 11.1$^{+0.4}_{-1.1}$ M$_{\rm {\tiny jup}}$, $a$ = 4.9$^{+0.14}_{-0.13}$ AU and $e$ = 0.59$^{+0.05}_{-0.02}$. Considering random inclination angles, this object has $\gtrsim$ 65% probability to be above the theoretical deuterium-burning limit, thus it is one of the few known objects in the planet to brown-dwarf transition region. In addition, we analyzed the Hipparcos astrometric data of this star, from which we derived a minimum inclination angle for the companion of $\sim$ 2 deg. This value corresponds to an upper mass limit of $\sim$ 0.3 M$_\odot$, therefore the probability that HIP67537$\,b$ is stellar in nature is $\lesssim$ 7%. The large mass of the host star and the high orbital eccentricity makes HIP67537$\,b$ a very interesting and rare substellar object. This is the second candidate companion in the brown dwarf desert detected in the sample of intermediate-mass stars targeted by the EXPRESS radial velocity program, which corresponds to a detection fraction of $f$ = 1.6$^{+2.0}_{-0.5}$%. This value is larger than the fraction observed in solar-type stars, providing new observational evidence of an enhanced formation efficiency of massive substellar companions in massive disks. Finally, we speculate about different formation channels for this object.
  • We report the discovery of eight new giant planets, and updated orbits for four known planets, orbiting dwarf and subgiant stars using the CORALIE, HARPS, and MIKE instruments as part of the Calan-Hertfordshire Extrasolar Planet Search. The planets have masses in the range 1.1-5.4MJs, orbital periods from 40-2900 days, and eccentricities from 0.0-0.6. They include a double-planet system orbiting the most massive star in our sample (HD147873), two eccentric giant planets (HD128356b and HD154672b), and a rare 14 Herculis analogue (HD224538b). We highlight some population correlations from the sample of radial velocity detected planets orbiting nearby stars, including the mass function exponential distribution, confirmation of the growing body of evidence that low-mass planets tend to be found orbiting more metal-poor stars than giant planets, and a possible period-metallicity correlation for planets with masses >0.1MJ, based on a metallicity difference of 0.16 dex between the population of planets with orbital periods less than 100 days and those with orbital periods greater than 100 days.
  • We present spectroscopic and photometric solutions for three spotted systems with red giant components. Absolute physical and orbital parameters for these double-lined detached eclipsing binary stars are presented for the first time. These were derived from the V-, and I-band ASAS and WASP photometry, and new radial velocities calculated from high quality optical spectra we obtained with a wide range of spectrographs and using the two-dimensional cross-correlation technique (TODCOR). All of the investigated systems (ASAS J184949-1518.7, BQ Aqr, and V1207 Cen) show the differential evolutionary phase of their components consisting of a main sequence star or a subgiant and a red giant, and thus constitute very informative objects in terms of testing stellar evolution models. Additionally, the systems show significant chromospheric activity of both components. They can be also classified as classical RS CVn-type stars. Besides the standard analysis of radial velocities and photometry, we applied spectral disentangling to obtain separate spectra for both components of each analysed system which allowed for a more detailed spectroscopic study. We also compared the properties of red giant stars in binaries that show spots, with those that do not, and found that the activity phenomenon is substantially suppressed for stars with Rossby number higher than $\sim$1 and radii larger than $\sim$20 R$_\odot$.
  • We report the discovery of five new transiting hot Jupiter planets discovered by the HATSouth survey: HATS-31b through HATS-35b. These planets orbit moderately bright stars with V magnitudes within the range 11.9-14.4mag while the planets span a range of masses 0.88-1.22MJ, and have somewhat inflated radii between 1.23-1.64RJ.These planets can be classified as typical hot Jupiters, with HATS-31b and HATS-35b being moderately inflated gas giant planets with radii of $1.64 \pm 0.22$ RJ and 1.464+0.069-0.044RJ, respectively, that can be used to constrain inflation mechanisms. All five systems present a higher Bayesian evidence for a fixed circular orbit model than for an eccentric orbit. The orbital periods range from $1.8209993 \pm 0.0000016$ day for HATS-35b) to $3.377960 \pm 0.000012$ day for HATS-31b. Additionally, HATS-35b orbits a relatively young F star with an age of $2.13 \pm 0.51$ Gyr. We discuss the analysis to derive the properties of these systems and compare them in the context of the sample of well characterized transiting hot Jupiters known to date.
  • We report the discovery by the HATSouth exoplanet survey of three hot-Saturn transiting exoplanets: HATS-19b, HATS-20b, and HATS-21b. The planet host HATS-19 is a slightly evolved V = 13.0 G0 star with [Fe/H] = 0.240, a mass of 1.303 Msun, and a radius of 1.75 Rsun. HATS-19b is in an eccentric orbit (e = 0.30) around this star with an orbital period of 4.5697 days and has a mass of 0.427 Mjup and a highly inflated radius of 1.66 Rjup. The planet HATS-20b has a Saturn-like mass and radius of 0.273 Mjup and 0.776 Rjup respectively. It orbits the V = 13.8 G9V star HATS-20 (Ms = 0.910 Msun; Rs = 0.892 Rsun) with a period of 3.7993 days. Finally, HATS-21 is a V = 12.2 G4V star with [Fe/H] = 0.300, a mass of 1.080 Msun, and a radius of 1.021 Rsun. Its accompanying planet HATS-21b has a 3.5544-day orbital period, a mass of 0.332 Mjup, and a moderately inflated radius of 1.123 Rjup. With the addition of these three very different planets to the growing sample of hot-Saturns, we re-examine the relations between the observed giant planet radii, stellar irradiation, and host metallicity. We find a significant positive correlation between planet equilibrium temperature and radius, and a weak negative correlation between host metallicity and radius. To assess the relative influence of various physical parameters on observed planet radii, we train and fit models using Random Forest regression. We find that for hot-Saturns (0.1 < Mp < 0.5 Mjup), the planetary mass and equilibrium temperature play dominant roles in determining radii. For hot-Jupiters (0.5 < Mp < 2.0 Mjup), the most important parameter is equilibrium temperature alone. Finally, for irradiated higher-mass planets (Mp > 2.0 Mjup), we find that equilibrium temperature dominates in influence, with smaller contributions from planet mass and host metallicity.
  • The WASP-98 planetary system represents a rare case of a hot Jupiter hosted by a metal-poor main-sequence star. We present a follow-up study of this system based on multi-band photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy. Two new transit events of WASP-98b were simultaneously observed in four passbands (g,r,i,z), using the telescope-defocussing technique, yielding eight high-precision light curves with point-to-point scatters of less than 1 mmag. We also collected three spectra of the parent star with a high-resolution spectrograph, which we used to remeasure its spectral characteristics, in particular its metallicity. We found this to be very low, Fe/H]=-0.49, but larger than was previously reported, [Fe/H]=-0.60. We used these new photometric and spectroscopic data to refine the orbital and physical properties of this planetary system, finding that the stellar and planetary mass measurements are significantly larger than those in the discovery paper. In addition, the multi-band light curves were used to construct an optical transmission spectrum of WASP-98b and probe the characteristics of its atmosphere at the terminator. We measured a lower radius at z compared with the other three passbands. The maximum variation is between the r and z bands, has a confidence level of roughly 6 sigma and equates to 5.5 pressure scale heights. We compared this spectrum to theoretical models, investigating several possible types of atmospheres, including hazy, cloudy, cloud-free, and clear atmospheres with titanium and vanadium oxide opacities. We could not find a good fit to the observations, except in the extreme case of a clear atmosphere with TiO and VO opacities, in which the condensation of Ti and V was suppressed. As this case is unrealistic, our results suggest the presence of an additional optical-absorbing species in the atmosphere of WASP-98b, of unknown chemical nature.
  • We report six new inflated hot Jupiters (HATS-25b through HATS-30b) discovered using the HATSouth global network of automated telescopes. The planets orbit stars with $V$ magnitudes in the range $\sim 12-14$ and have masses in the largely populated $0.5M_J-0.7M_J$ region of parameter space but span a wide variety of radii, from $1.17R_J$ to $1.75 R_J$. HATS-25b, HATS-28b, HATS-29b and HATS-30b are typical inflated hot Jupiters ($R_p = 1.17-1.26R_J$) orbiting G-type stars in short period ($P=3.2-4.6$ days) orbits. However, HATS-26b ($R_p = 1.75R_J$, $P = 3.3024$ days) and HATS-27b ($R_p=1.50R_J$, $P=4.6370$ days) stand out as highly inflated planets orbiting slightly evolved F stars just after and in the turn-off points, respectively, which are among the least dense hot Jupiters, with densities of $0.153$ g cm$^{-3}$ and $0.180$ g cm$^{-3}$, respectively. All the presented exoplanets but HATS-27b are good targets for future atmospheric characterization studies, while HATS-27b is a prime target for Rossiter-McLaughlin monitoring in order to determine its spin-orbit alignment given the brightness ($V = 12.8$) and stellar rotational velocity ($v \sin i \approx 9.3$ km/s) of the host star. These discoveries significantly increase the number of inflated hot Jupiters known, contributing to our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for hot Jupiter inflation.
  • We confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-539b (aka Kepler object of interest K00372.01), a giant transiting exoplanet orbiting a solar-analogue G2 V star. The mass of Kepler-539b was accurately derived thanks to a series of precise radial velocity measurements obtained with the CAFE spectrograph mounted on the CAHA 2.2m telescope. A simultaneous fit of the radial-velocity data and Kepler photometry revealed that Kepler-539b is a dense Jupiter-like planet with a mass of Mp = 0.97 Mjup and a radius of Rp = 0.747 Rjup, making a complete circular revolution around its parent star in 125.6 days. The semi-major axis of the orbit is roughly 0.5 au, implying that the planet is at roughly 0.45 au from the habitable zone. By analysing the mid-transit times of the 12 transit events of Kepler-539b recorded by the Kepler spacecraft, we found a clear modulated transit time variation (TTV), which is attributable to the presence of a planet c in a wider orbit. The few timings available do not allow us to precisely estimate the properties of Kepler-539c and our analysis suggests that it has a mass between 1.2 and 3.6 Mjup, revolving on a very eccentric orbit (0.4<e<0.6) with a period larger than 1000 days. The high eccentricity of planet c is the probable cause of the TTV modulation of planet b. The analysis of the CAFE spectra revealed a relatively high photospheric lithium content, A(Li)=2.48 dex, which, together with both a gyrochronological and isochronal analysis, suggests that the parent star is relatively young.
  • The young associations offer us one of the best opportunities to study the properties of young stellar and substellar objects and to directly image planets thanks to their proximity ($<$200 pc) and age ($\approx$5-150 Myr). However, many previous works have been limited to identifying the brighter, more active members ($\approx$1 M$_\odot$) owing to photometric survey sensitivities limiting the detections of lower mass objects. We search the field of view of 542 previously identified members of the young associations to identify wide or extremely wide (1000-100,000 au in physical separation) companions. We combined 2MASS near-infrared photometry ($J$, $H$, $K$) with proper motion values (from UCAC4, PPMXL, NOMAD) to identify companions in the field of view of known members. We collated further photometry and spectroscopy from the literature and conducted our own high-resolution spectroscopic observations for a subsample of candidate members. This complementary information allowed us to assess the efficiency of our method. We identified 84 targets (45: 0.2-1.3 M$_\odot$, 17: 0.08-0.2 M$_\odot$, 22: $<$0.08 M$_\odot$) in our analysis, ten of which have been identified from spectroscopic analysis in previous young association works. For 33 of these 84, we were able to further assess their membership using a variety of properties (X-ray emission, UV excess, H$_\alpha$, lithium and K I equivalent widths, radial velocities, and CaH indices). We derive a success rate of 76-88% for this technique based on the consistency of these properties. Once confirmed, the targets identified in this work would significantly improve our knowledge of the lower mass end of the young associations. Additionally, these targets would make an ideal new sample for the identification and study of planets around nearby young stars.
  • CONTEXT. Exoplanet searches have demonstrated that giant planets are preferentially found around metal-rich stars and that their fraction increases with the stellar mass. AIMS. During the past six years, we have conducted a radial velocity follow-up program of 166 giant stars, to detect substellar companions, and characterizing their orbital properties. Using this information, we aim to study the role of the stellar evolution in the orbital parameters of the companions, and to unveil possible correlations between the stellar properties and the occurrence rate of giant planets. METHODS. Using FEROS and CHIRON spectra, we have computed precision radial velocities and we have derived atmospheric and physical parameters for all of our targets. Additionally, velocities computed from UCLES spectra are presented here. By studying the periodic radial velocity signals, we have detected the presence of several substellar companions. RESULTS. We present four new planetary systems around the giant stars HIP8541, HIP74890, HIP84056 and HIP95124. Additionally, we find that giant planets are more frequent around metal-rich stars, reaching a peak in the detection of $f$ = 16.7$^{+15.5}_{-5.9}$% around stars with [Fe/H] $\sim$ 0.35 dex. Similarly, we observe a positive correlation of the planet occurrence rate with the stellar mass, between M$_\star$ $\sim$ 1.0 -2.1 M$_\odot$, with a maximum of $f$ = 13.0$^{+10.1}_{-4.2}$%, at M$_\star$ = 2.1 M$_\odot$. CONCLUSIONS. We conclude that giant planets are preferentially formed around metal-rich stars. Also, we conclude that they are more efficiently formed around more massive stars, in the mass range of M$_\star$ $\sim$ 1.0 - 2.1 M$_\odot$. These observational results confirm previous findings for solar-type and post-MS hosting stars, and provide further support to the core-accretion formation model.
  • We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets from the HATSouth survey. HATS-11, a V=14.1 G0-star shows a periodic 12.9 mmag dip in its light curve every 3.6192 days and a radial velocity variation consistent with a Keplerian orbit. HATS-11 has a mass of 1.000 $\pm$ 0.060 M$_{\odot}$, a radius of 1.444 $\pm$ 0.057 M$_{\odot}$ and an effective temperature of 6060 $\pm$ 150 K, while its companion is a 0.85 $\pm$ 0.12 M$_J$, 1.510 $\pm$ 0.078 R$_J$ planet in a circular orbit. HATS-12 shows a periodic 5.1 mmag flux decrease every 3.1428 days and Keplerian RV variations around a V=12.8 F-star. HATS-12 has a mass of 1.489 $\pm$ 0.071 M$_{\odot}$, a radius of 2.21 $\pm$ 0.21 R$_{\odot}$, and an effective temperature of 6408 $\pm$ 75 K. For HATS-12, our measurements indicate that this is a 2.38 $\pm$ 0.11 M$_J$, 1.35 $\pm$ 0.17 R$_J$ planet in a circular orbit. Both host stars show sub-solar metallicity of -0.390 $\pm$ 0.060 dex and -0.100 $\pm$ 0.040 dex, respectively and are (slightly) evolved stars. In fact, HATS-11 is amongst the most metal-poor and, HATS-12 is amongst the most evolved stars hosting a hot Jupiter planet. Importantly, HATS-11 and HATS-12 have been observed in long cadence by Kepler as part of K2 campaign 7 (EPIC216414930 and EPIC218131080 respectively).
  • We report the discovery of two giant planets orbiting the K giant HD 33844 based on radial velocity data from three independent campaigns. The planets move on nearly circular orbits with semimajor axes $a_b=1.60\pm$0.02 AU and $a_c=2.24\pm$0.05 AU, and have minimum masses (m sin $i$) of $M_b=1.96\pm$0.12 Mjup and $M_c=1.76\pm$0.18 Mjup. Detailed N-body dynamical simulations show that the two planets remain on stable orbits for more than $10^6$ years for low eccentricities, and are most likely trapped in a mutual 3:5 mean-motion resonance.
  • We report the discovery of HATS-15 b and HATS-16 b, two massive transiting extrasolar planets orbiting evolved ($\sim 10$ Gyr) main-sequence stars. The planet HATS-15 b, which is hosted by a G9V star ($V=14.8$ mag), is a hot Jupiter with mass of $2.17\pm0.15\, M_{\mathrm{J}}$ and radius of $1.105\pm0.0.040\, R_{\mathrm{J}}$, and completes its orbit in nearly 1.7 days. HATS-16 b is a very massive hot Jupiter with mass of $3.27\pm0.19\, M_{\mathrm{J}}$ and radius of $1.30\pm0.15\, R_{\mathrm{J}}$; it orbits around its G3 V parent star ($V=13.8$ mag) in $\sim2.7$ days. HATS-16 is slightly active and shows a periodic photometric modulation, implying a rotational period of 12 days which is unexpectedly short given its isochronal age. This fast rotation might be the result of the tidal interaction between the star and its planet.
  • Accurate measurements of the physical characteristics of a large number of exoplanets are useful to strongly constrain theoretical models of planet formation and evolution, which lead to the large variety of exoplanets and planetary-system configurations that have been observed. We present a study of the planetary systems WASP-45 and WASP-46, both composed of a main-sequence star and a close-in hot Jupiter, based on 29 new high-quality light curves of transits events. In particular, one transit of WASP-45 b and four of WASP-46 b were simultaneously observed in four optical filters, while one transit of WASP-46 b was observed with the NTT obtaining precision of 0.30 mmag with a cadence of roughly three minutes. We also obtained five new spectra of WASP-45 with the FEROS spectrograph. We improved by a factor of four the measurement of the radius of the planet WASP-45 b, and found that WASP-46 b is slightly less massive and smaller than previously reported. Both planets now have a more accurate measurement of the density (0.959 +\- 0.077 \rho Jup instead of 0.64 +\- 0.30 \rho Jup for WASP-45 b, and 1.103 +\- 0.052 \rho Jup instead of 0.94 +\- 0.11 \rho Jup for WASP-46 b). We tentatively detected radius variations with wavelength for both planets, in particular in the case of WASP-45 b we found a slightly larger absorption in the redder bands than in the bluer ones. No hints for the presence of an additional planetary companion in the two systems were found either from the photometric or radial velocity measurements.
  • We report a spin-orbit misalignment for the hot-Jupiter HATS-14b, measuring a projected orbital obliquity of |lambda|= 76 -5/+4 deg. HATS-14b orbits a high metallicity, 5400 K G dwarf in a relatively short period orbit of 2.8 days. This obliquity was measured via the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, obtained with observations from Keck-HIRES. The velocities were extracted using a novel technique, optimised for low signal-to-noise spectra, achieving a high precision of 4 m/s point-to-point scatter. However, we caution that our uncertainties may be underestimated. Due to the low rotational velocity of the star, the detection significance is dependent on the vsini prior that is imposed in our modelling. Based on trends observed in the sample of hot Jupiters with obliquity measurements, it has been suggested that these planets modify the spin axes of their host stars, with an efficiency that depends on the stellar type and orbital period of the system. In this framework, short-period planets around stars with surface convective envelopes, like HATS-14b, are expected to have orbits that are aligned with the spin axes of their host stars. HATS-14b, however, is a significant outlier from this trend, challenging the effectiveness of the tidal realignment mechanism.
  • We report the discovery of HATS-17b, the first transiting warm Jupiter of the HATSouth network. HATS-17b transits its bright (V=12.4) G-type (M$_{\star}$=1.131 $\pm$ 0.030 M$_{\odot}$, R$_{\star}$=1.091$^{+0.070}_{-0.046}$ R$_{\star}$) metal-rich ([Fe/H]=+0.3 dex) host star in a circular orbit with a period of P=16.2546 days. HATS-17b has a very compact radius of 0.777 $\pm$ 0.056 R$_J$ given its Jupiter-like mass of 1.338 $\pm$ 0.065 M$_J$. Up to 50% of the mass of HATS-17b may be composed of heavy elements in order to explain its high density with current models of planetary structure. HATS-17b is the longest period transiting planet discovered to date by a ground-based photometric survey, and is one of the brightest transiting warm Jupiter systems known. The brightness of HATS-17b will allow detailed follow-up observations to characterize the orbital geometry of the system and the atmosphere of the planet.