• We studied the nearby, interacting galaxy NGC 5195 (M51b) in the radio, optical and X-ray bands. We mapped the extended, low-surface-brightness features of its radio-continuum emission; determined the energy content of its complex structure of shock-ionized gas; constrained the current activity level of its supermassive nuclear black hole. In particular, we combined data from the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (~1-pc scale), from our new e-MERLIN observations (~10-pc scale), and from the Very Large Array (~100-1000-pc scale), to obtain a global picture of energy injection in this galaxy. We put an upper limit to the luminosity of the (undetected) flat-spectrum radio core. We find steep-spectrum, extended emission within 10 pc of the nuclear position, consistent with optically-thin synchrotron emission from nuclear star formation or from an outflow powered by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). A linear spur of radio emission juts out of the nuclear source towards the kpc-scale arcs (detected in radio, Halpha and X-ray bands). From the size, shock velocity, and Balmer line luminosity of the kpc-scale bubble, we estimate that it was inflated by a long-term-average mechanical power ~3-6 x 10^{41} erg/s over the last 3-6 Myr. This is an order of magnitude more power than can be provided by the current level of star formation, and by the current accretion power of the supermassive black hole. We argue that a jet-inflated bubble scenario associated with previous episodes of AGN activity is the most likely explanation for the kpc-scale structures.
  • We present the first data release of high-resolution ($\leq0.2$ arcsec) 1.5-GHz radio images of 103 nearby galaxies from the Palomar sample, observed with the eMERLIN array, as part of the LeMMINGs survey. This sample includes galaxies which are active (LINER and Seyfert) and quiescent (HII galaxies and Absorption line galaxies, ALG), which are reclassified based upon revised emission-line diagrams. We detect radio emission $\gtrsim$ 0.2 mJy for 47/103 galaxies (22/34 for LINERS, 4/4 for Seyferts, 16/51 for HII galaxies and 5/14 for ALGs) with radio sizes typically of $\lesssim$100 pc. We identify the radio core position within the radio structures for 41 sources. Half of the sample shows jetted morphologies. The remaining half shows single radio cores or complex morphologies. LINERs show radio structures more core-brightened than Seyferts. Radio luminosities of the sample range from 10$^{32}$ to 10$^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$: LINERs and HII galaxies show the highest and the lowest radio powers respectively, while ALGs and Seyferts have intermediate luminosities. We find that radio core luminosities correlate with black hole (BH) mass down to $\sim$10$^{7}$ M$_{\odot}$, but a break emerges at lower masses. Using [O III] line luminosity as a proxy for the accretion luminosity, active nuclei and jetted HII galaxies follow an optical fundamental plane of BH activity, suggesting a common disc-jet relationship. In conclusion, LINER nuclei are the scaled-down version of FR I radio galaxies; Seyferts show less collimated jets; HII galaxies may host weak active BHs and/or nuclear star-forming cores; and recurrent BH activity may account for ALG properties.
  • We present high-sensitivity eMERLIN radio images of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 at 1.5 GHz. We compare the new eMERLIN images to those from archival MERLIN observations in 1993 to determine the change in jet morphology in the 22 years between observations. We report an increase by almost a factor of 2 in the peak flux density of the central core component, C4, thought to host the black hole, but a probable decrease in some other components, possibly due to adiabatic expansion. The core flux increase indicates an AGN which is currently active and feeding the jet. We detect no significant motion in 22 years between C4 and the component C3, which is unresolved in the eMERLIN image. We present a spectral index image made within the 512 MHz band of the 1.5 GHz observations. The spectrum of the core, C4, is flatter than that of other components further out in the jet. We use HST emission line images (H$\alpha$, [O III] and [O II]) to study the connection between the jet and the emission line region. Based on the changing emission line ratios away from the core and comparison with the eMERLIN radio jet, we conclude that photoionisation from the central AGN is responsible for the observed emission line properties further than 4" (360 pc) from the core, C4. Within this region, several evidences (radio-line co-spatiality, low [O III]/H$\alpha$ and estimated fast shocks) suggest additional ionisation from the jet.
  • We built a catalog of 122 FR~II radio galaxies, called FRII{\sl{CAT}}, selected from a published sample obtained by combining observations from the NVSS, FIRST, and SDSS surveys. The catalog includes sources with redshift $\leq 0.15$, an edge-brightened radio morphology, and those with at least one of the emission peaks located at radius $r$ larger than 30 kpc from the center of the host. The radio luminosity at 1.4 GHz of the \FRII\ sources covers the range $L_{1.4} \sim 10^{39.5} - 10^{42.5}$ $\ergs$. The \FRII\ catalog has 90\% of low and 10\% of high excitation galaxies (LEGs and HEGs), respectively. The properties of these two classes are significantly different. The FRII{\sl{CAT}} LEGs are mostly luminous ($-20 \gtrsim M_r \gtrsim -24$), red early-type galaxies with black hole masses in the range $10^8 \lesssim M_{\rm BH} \lesssim 10^9 M_\odot$; they are essentially indistinguishable from the FR~Is belonging to the FRI{\sl{CAT}}. The HEG FR~IIs are associated with optically bluer and mid-IR redder hosts than the LEG FR~IIs and to galaxies and black holes that are smaller, on average, by a factor $\sim$2. FR~IIs have a factor $\sim$ 3 higher average radio luminosity than FR~Is. Nonetheless, most ($\sim 90$ \%) of the selected FR~IIs have a radio power that is lower, by as much as a factor of $\sim$100, than the transition value between FR~Is and FR~IIs found in the 3C sample. The correspondence between the morphological classification of FR~I and FR~II and the separation in radio power disappears when including sources selected at low radio flux thresholds, which is in line with previous results. In conclusion, a radio source produced by a low power jet can be edge brightened or edge darkened, and the outcome is not related to differences in the optical properties of the host galaxy.
  • We analyze the properties of the innermost narrow line region in a sample of low-luminosity AGN. We select 33 LINERs (bona fide AGN) and Seyfert galaxies from the optical spectroscopic Palomar survey observed by HST/STIS. We find that in LINERs the [NII] and [OI] lines are broader than the [SII] line and that the [NII]/[SII] flux ratio increases when moving from ground-based to HST spectra. This effect is more pronounced considering the wings of the lines. Our interpretation is that, as a result of superior HST spatial resolution, we isolate a compact region of dense ionized gas in LINERs, located at a typical distance of about 3 pc and with a gas density of about 10$^4$-10$^5$ cm$^{-3}$, which we identify with the outer portion of the intermediate line region (ILR). Instead, we do not observe these kinds of effects in Seyferts; this may be the result of a stronger dilution from the NLR emission, since the HST slit maps a larger region in these sources. Alternatively, we argue that the innermost, higher density component of the ILR is only present in Seyferts, while it is truncated at larger radii because of the presence of the circumnuclear torus. The ILR is only visible in its entirety in LINERs because the obscuring torus is not present in these sources.
  • Using HST NICMOS 2 observations we have measured 1.6-micron near infrared nuclear luminosities of 100 3CR radio galaxies with z<0.3, by modeling and subtracting the extended emission from the host galaxy. We performed a multi-wavelength statistical analysis (including optical and radio data) of the properties of the nuclei following classification of the objects into FRI and FRII, and LIG (low-ionization galaxies), HIG (high-ionization galaxies) and BLO (broad-lined objects) using the radio morphology and optical spectra, respectively. The correlations among near infrared, optical, and radio nuclear luminosity support the idea that the near infrared nuclear emission of FRIs has a non-thermal origin. Despite the difference in radio morphology, the multi-wavelength properties of FRII LIG nuclei are statistically indistinguishable from those of FRIs, an indication of a common structure of the central engine. All BLOs show an unresolved near infrared nucleus and a large near infrared excess with respect to FRII LIGs and FRIs of equal radio core luminosity. This requires the presence of an additional (and dominant) component other than the non-thermal light. Considering the shape of their spectral energy distribution, we ascribe the origin of their near infrared light to hot circumnuclear dust. A near infrared excess is also found in HIGs, but their nuclei are substantially fainter than those of BLO. This result indicates that substantial obscuration along the line-of-sight to the nuclei is still present at 1.6 micron. Nonetheless, HIGs nuclei cannot simply be explained in terms of dust obscuration: a significant contribution from light reflected in a circumnuclear scattering region is needed to account for their multiwavelength properties.