• We identify HS 2325+8205 as an eclipsing, frequently outbursting dwarf nova with an orbital period of 279.841731(5) min. Spectroscopic observations are used to derive the radial velocity curve of the secondary star from absorption features and also from the H-alpha emission lines, originating from the accretion disc, yielding K_secondary = K_abs = 237 +- 28 km/s and K_emn = 145 +- 9 km/s respectively. The distance to the system is calculated to be 400 (+200, -140) pc. A photometric monitoring campaign reveals an outburst recurrence time of 12-14 d, The combination of magnitude range (17-14 mag), high declination, eclipsing nature and frequency of outbursts makes HS 2325+8205 the ideal system for "real-time" studies of the accretion disc evolution and behavior in dwarf nova outbursts.
  • We use a combination of X-shooter spectroscopy, ULTRACAM high-speed photometry and SOFI near-infrared photometry to measure the masses and radii of both components of the eclipsing post common envelope binaries SDSS J1212-0123 and GK Vir. For both systems we measure the gravitational redshift of the white dwarf and combine it with light curve model fits to determine the inclinations, masses and radii. For SDSS J1212-0123 we find a white dwarf mass and radius of 0.439 +/- 0.002 Msun and 0.0168 +/- 0.0003 Rsun, and a secondary star mass and radius of 0.273 +/- 0.002 Msun and 0.306 +/- 0.007 Rsun. For GK Vir we find a white dwarf mass and radius of 0.564 +/- 0.014 Msun and 0.0170 +/- 0.0004 Rsun, and a secondary star mass and radius of 0.116 +/- 0.003 Msun and 0.155 +/- 0.003 Rsun. The mass and radius of the white dwarf in GK Vir are consistent with evolutionary models for a 50,000K carbon-oxygen core white dwarf. Although the mass and radius of the white dwarf in SDSS J1212-0123 are consistent with carbon-oxygen core models, evolutionary models imply that a white dwarf with such a low mass and in a short period binary must have a helium core. The mass and radius measurements are consistent with helium core models but only if the white dwarf has a very thin hydrogen envelope, which has not been predicted by evolutionary models. The mass and radius of the secondary star in GK Vir are consistent with evolutionary models after correcting for the effects of irradiation by the white dwarf. The secondary star in SDSS J1212-0123 has a radius ~9 per cent larger than predicted.
  • We present high-speed optical photometry of the soft gamma repeater SGR 0501+4516, obtained with ULTRACAM on two consecutive nights approximately 4 months after the source was discovered via its gamma-ray bursts. We detect SGR 0501+4516 at a magnitude of i' = 24.4+/-0.1. We present the first measurement of optical pulsations from an SGR, deriving a period of 5.7622+/-0.0003 s, in excellent agreement with the X-ray spin period of the neutron star. We compare the morphologies of the optical pulse profile with the X-ray and infrared pulse profiles; we find that the optical, infrared and harder X-rays share similar double-peaked morphologies, but the softer X-rays exhibit only a single-peaked morphology, indicative of a different origin. The optical pulsations appear to be in phase with the X-ray pulsations and exhibit a root-mean-square pulsed fraction of 52+/-7%, approximately a factor of two greater than in the X-rays. Our results find a natural explanation within the context of the magnetar model for SGRs.
  • We present high-speed, three-colour photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variables CTCV 1300, CTCV 2354 and SDSS 1152. All three systems are below the observed "period gap" for cataclysmic variables. For each system we determine the system parameters by fitting a parameterised model to the observed eclipse light curve by chi-squared minimisation. We also present an updated analysis of all other eclipsing systems previously analysed by our group. New donor masses are generally between 1 and 2 sigma of those originally published, with the exception of SDSS 1502 and DV UMa. We note that the donor mass of SDSS 1501 has been revised upwards by 0.024Msun. This system was previously identified as having evolved passed the minimum orbital period for cataclysmic variables, but the new mass determination suggests otherwise. Our new analysis confirms that SDSS 1035 and SDSS 1433 have evolved past the period minimum for cataclysmic variables, corroborating our earlier studies. We find that the radii of donor stars are oversized when compared to theoretical models, by approximately 10 percent. We show that this can be explained by invoking either enhanced angular momentum loss, or by taking into account the effects of star spots. We are unable to favour one cause over the other, as we lack enough precise mass determinations for systems with orbital periods between 100 and 130 minutes, where evolutionary tracks begin to diverge significantly. We also find a strong tendency towards high white dwarf masses within our sample, and no evidence for any He-core white dwarfs. The dominance of high mass white dwarfs implies that erosion of the white dwarf during the nova outburst must be negligible, or that not all of the mass accreted is ejected during nova cycles, resulting in the white dwarf growing in mass. (Abridged)
  • The Rotating RAdio Transient (RRAT) J1819-1458 exhibits ~3 ms bursts in the radio every ~3 min, implying that it is visible for only ~1 per day. Assuming that the optical light behaves in a similar manner, long exposures of the field would be relatively insensitive due to the accumulation of sky photons. A much better way of detecting optical emission from J1819-1458 would then be to observe with a high-speed optical camera simultaneously with radio observations, and co-add only those optical frames coincident with the dispersion-corrected radio bursts. We present the results of such a search, using simultaneous ULTRACAM and Lovell Telescope observations. We find no evidence for optical bursts in J1819-1458 at magnitudes brighter than i'=19.3 (5-sigma limit). This is nearly 3 magnitudes fainter than the previous burst limit, which had no simultaneous radio observations.
  • We present high speed ULTRACAM photometry of the eclipsing post common envelope binaries DE CVn, GK Vir, NN Ser, QS Vir, RR Cae, RX J2130.6+4710, SDSS 0110+1326 and SDSS 0303+0054 and use these data to measure precise mid-eclipse times in order to detect any period variations. We detect a large (~ 250 sec) departure from linearity in the eclipse times of QS Vir which Applegate's mechanism fails to reproduce by an order of magnitude. The only mechanism able to drive this period change is a third body in a highly elliptical orbit. However, the planetary/sub-stellar companion previously suggested to exist in this system is ruled out by our data. Our eclipse times show that the period decrease detected in NN Ser is continuing, with magnetic braking or a third body the only mechanisms able to explain this change. The planetary/sub-stellar companion previously suggested to exist in NN Ser is also ruled out by our data. Our precise eclipse times also lead to improved ephemerides for DE CVn and GK Vir. The width of a primary eclipse is directly related to the size of the secondary star and variations in the size of this star could be an indication of Applegate's mechanism or Wilson (starspot) depressions which can cause jitter in the O-C curves. We measure the width of primary eclipses for the systems NN Ser and GK Vir over several years but find no definitive variations in the radii of the secondary stars. However, our data are precise enough (dRsec / Rsec < 10^-5) to show the effects of Applegate's mechanism in the future. We find no evidence of Wilson depressions in either system. We also find tentative indications that flaring rates of the secondary stars depend on their mass rather than rotation rates.
  • We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of SDSS J100658.40+233724.4, which we have discovered to be an eclipsing cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 0.18591324 days (267.71507 min). The observed velocity amplitude of the secondary star is 276 +/- 7 km/s, which an irradiation correction reduces to 258 +/- 12 km/s. Doppler tomography of emission lines from the infrared calcium triplet supports this measurement. We have modelled the light curve using the LCURVE code and Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, finding a mass ratio of 0.51 +/- 0.08. From the velocity amplitude and the light curve analysis we find the mass of the white dwarf to be 0.78 +/- 0.12 Msun and the masses and radii of the secondary star to be 0.40 +/- 0.10 Msun and 0.466 +/- 0.036 Rsun, respectively. The secondary component is less dense than a normal main sequence star but its properties are in good agreement with the expected values for a CV of this orbital period. By modelling the spectral energy distribution of the system we find a distance of 676 +/- 40 pc and estimate a white dwarf effective temperature of 16500 +/- 2000 K.