• The MIGHTEE large survey project will survey four of the most well-studied extragalactic deep fields, totalling 20 square degrees to $\mu$Jy sensitivity at Giga-Hertz frequencies, as well as an ultra-deep image of a single ~1 square degree MeerKAT pointing. The observations will provide radio continuum, spectral line and polarisation information. As such, MIGHTEE, along with the excellent multi-wavelength data already available in these deep fields, will allow a range of science to be achieved. Specifically, MIGHTEE is designed to significantly enhance our understanding of, (i) the evolution of AGN and star-formation activity over cosmic time, as a function of stellar mass and environment, free of dust obscuration; (ii) the evolution of neutral hydrogen in the Universe and how this neutral gas eventually turns into stars after moving through the molecular phase, and how efficiently this can fuel AGN activity; (iii) the properties of cosmic magnetic fields and how they evolve in clusters, filaments and galaxies. MIGHTEE will reach similar depth to the planned SKA all-sky survey, and thus will provide a pilot to the cosmology experiments that will be carried out by the SKA over a much larger survey volume.
  • Of the almost 40 star forming galaxies at z>~5 (not counting QSOs) observed in [CII] to date, nearly half are either very faint in [CII], or not detected at all, and fall well below expectations based on locally derived relations between star formation rate (SFR) and [CII] luminosity. Combining cosmological zoom simulations of galaxies with SIGAME (SImulator of GAlaxy Millimeter/submillimeter Emission) we have modeled the multi-phased interstellar medium (ISM) and its emission in [CII], [OI] and [OIII], from 30 main sequence galaxies at z~6 with star formation rates ~3-23Msun/yr, stellar masses ~(0.7-8)x10^9Msun, and metallicities ~(0.1-0.4)xZsun. The simulations are able to reproduce the aforementioned [CII]-faintness at z>5, match two of the three existing z>~5 detections of [OIII], and are furthermore roughly consistent with the [OI] and [OIII] luminosity relations with SFR observed for local starburst galaxies. We find that the [CII] emission is dominated by the diffuse ionized gas phase and molecular clouds, which on average contribute ~66% and ~27%, respectively. The molecular gas, which constitutes only ~10% of the total gas mass is thus a more efficient emitter of [CII] than the ionized gas making up ~85% of the total gas mass. A principal component analysis shows that the [CII] luminosity correlates with the star formation activity as well as average metallicity. The low metallicities of our simulations together with their low molecular gas mass fractions can account for their [CII]-faintness, and we suggest these factors may also be responsible for the [CII]-faint normal galaxies observed at these early epochs.
  • We present Herschel PACS observations of the [CII] 158 micron emission line in a sample of 24 intermediate mass (9<logM$_\ast$/M$_\odot$<10) and low metallicity (0.4< Z/Z$_\odot$<1.0) galaxies from the xCOLD GASS survey. Combining them with IRAM CO(1-0) measurements, we establish scaling relations between integrated and molecular region [CII]/CO(1-0) luminosity ratios as a function of integrated galaxy properties. A Bayesian analysis reveals that only two parameters, metallicity and offset from the star formation main sequence, $\Delta$MS, are needed to quantify variations in the luminosity ratio; metallicity describes the total dust content available to shield CO from UV radiation, while $\Delta$MS describes the strength of this radiation field. We connect the [CII]/CO luminosity ratio to the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor and find a multivariate conversion function $\alpha_{CO}$, which can be used up to z~2.5. This function depends primarily on metallicity, with a second order dependence on $\Delta$MS. We apply this to the full xCOLD GASS and PHIBSS1 surveys and investigate molecular gas scaling relations. We find a flattening of the relation between gas mass fraction and stellar mass at logM$_\ast$/M$_\odot$<10. While the molecular gas depletion time varies with sSFR, it is mostly independent of mass, indicating that the low L$_{CO}$/SFR ratios long observed in low mass galaxies are entirely due to photodissociation of CO, and not to an enhanced star formation efficiency.
  • Recent analysis of strongly-lensed sources in the Hubble Frontier Fields indicates that the rest-frame UV luminosity function of galaxies at $z=$6--8 rises as a power law down to $M_\mathrm{UV}=-15$, and possibly as faint as -12.5. We use predictions from a cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation to map these luminosities onto physical space, constraining the minimum dark matter halo mass and stellar mass that the Frontier Fields probe. While previously-published theoretical studies have suggested or assumed that early star formation was suppressed in halos less massive than $10^9$--$10^{11} M_\odot$, we find that recent observations demand vigorous star formation in halos at least as massive as (3.1, 5.6, 10.5)$\times10^9 M_\odot$ at $z=(6,7,8)$. Likewise, we find that Frontier Fields observations probe down to stellar masses of (8.1, 18, 32)$\times10^6 M_\odot$; that is, they are observing the likely progenitors of analogues to Local Group dwarfs such as Pegasus and M32. Our simulations yield somewhat different constraints than two complementary models that have been invoked in similar analyses, emphasizing the need for further observational constraints on the galaxy-halo connection.
  • The Hydrogen Intensity and Real-time Analysis eXperiment (HIRAX) is a new 400-800MHz radio interferometer under development for deployment in South Africa. HIRAX will comprise 1024 six meter parabolic dishes on a compact grid and will map most of the southern sky over the course of four years. HIRAX has two primary science goals: to constrain Dark Energy and measure structure at high redshift, and to study radio transients and pulsars. HIRAX will observe unresolved sources of neutral hydrogen via their redshifted 21-cm emission line (`hydrogen intensity mapping'). The resulting maps of large-scale structure at redshifts 0.8-2.5 will be used to measure Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). HIRAX will improve upon current BAO measurements from galaxy surveys by observing a larger cosmological volume (larger in both survey area and redshift range) and by measuring BAO at higher redshift when the expansion of the universe transitioned to Dark Energy domination. HIRAX will complement CHIME, a hydrogen intensity mapping experiment in the Northern Hemisphere, by completing the sky coverage in the same redshift range. HIRAX's location in the Southern Hemisphere also allows a variety of cross-correlation measurements with large-scale structure surveys at many wavelengths. Daily maps of a few thousand square degrees of the Southern Hemisphere, encompassing much of the Milky Way galaxy, will also open new opportunities for discovering and monitoring radio transients. The HIRAX correlator will have the ability to rapidly and eXperimentciently detect transient events. This new data will shed light on the poorly understood nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs), enable pulsar monitoring to enhance long-wavelength gravitational wave searches, and provide a rich data set for new radio transient phenomena searches. This paper discusses the HIRAX instrument, science goals, and current status.
  • The sources that drove cosmological reionization left clues regarding their identity in the slope and inhomogeneity of the ultraviolet ionizing background (UVB): Bright quasars (QSOs) generate a hard UVB with predominantly large-scale fluctuations while Population II stars generate a softer one with smaller-scale fluctuations. Metal absorbers probe the UVB's slope because different ions are sensitive to different energies. Likewise, they probe spatial fluctuations because they originate in regions where a galaxy-driven UVB is harder and more intense. We take a first step towards studying the reionization-epoch UVB's slope and inhomogeneity by comparing observations of 12 metal absorbers at $z\sim6$ versus predictions from a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation using three different UVBs: a soft, spatially-inhomogeneous "galaxies+QSOs" UVB; a homogeneous "galaxies+QSOs" UVB (Haardt & Madau 2012); and a QSOs-only model. All UVBs reproduce the observed column density distributions of CII, SiIV, and CIV reasonably well although high-column, high-ionization absorbers are underproduced, reflecting numerical limitations. With upper limits treated as detections, only a soft, fluctuating UVB reproduces both the observed SiIV/CIV and CII/CIV distributions. The QSOs-only UVB overpredicts both CIV/CII and CIV/SiIV, indicating that it is too hard. The Haardt & Madau (2012) UVB underpredicts CIV/SiIV, suggesting that it lacks amplifications near galaxies. Hence current observations prefer a soft, fluctuating UVB as expected from a predominantly Population II background although they cannot rule out a harder one. Future observations probing a factor of two deeper in metal column density will distinguish between the soft, fluctuating and QSOs-only UVBs.
  • Observations suggest that CII was more abundant than CIV in the intergalactic medium towards the end of the hydrogen reionization epoch. This transition provides a unique opportunity to study the enrichment history of intergalactic gas and the growth of the ionizing background (UVB) at early times. We study how carbon absorption evolves from z=10-5 using a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation that includes a self-consistent multifrequency UVB as well as a well-constrained model for galactic outflows to disperse metals. Our predicted UVB is within 2-4 times that of Haardt & Madau (2012), which is fair agreement given the uncertainties. Nonetheless, we use a calibration in post-processing to account for Lyman-alpha forest measurements while preserving the predicted spectral slope and inhomogeneity. The UVB fluctuates spatially in such a way that it always exceeds the volume average in regions where metals are found. This implies both that a spatially-uniform UVB is a poor approximation and that metal absorption is not sensitive to the epoch when HII regions overlap globally even at column densites of 10^{12} cm^{-2}. We find, consistent with observations, that the CII mass fraction drops to low redshift while CIV rises owing the combined effects of a growing UVB and continued addition of carbon in low-density regions. This is mimicked in absorption statistics, which broadly agree with observations at z=6-3 while predicting that the absorber column density distributions rise steeply to the lowest observable columns. Our model reproduces the large observed scatter in the number of low-ionization absorbers per sightline, implying that the scatter does not indicate a partially-neutral Universe at z=6.
  • We use a radiation hydrodynamic simulation of the hydrogen reionization epoch to study OI absorbers at z~6. The intergalactic medium (IGM) is reionized before it is enriched, hence OI absorption originates within dark matter halos. The predicted abundance of OI absorbers is in reasonable agreement with observations. At z=10, roughly 70% of sightlines through atomically-cooled halos encounter a visible (N_OI > 10^14 cm^-2) column. Reionization ionizes and removes gas from halos less massive than 10^8.4 M_0, but 20% of sightlines through more massive halos encounter visible columns even at z=5. The mass scale of absorber host halos is 10-100 times smaller than the halos of Lyman break galaxies and Lyman-alpha emitters, hence absorption probes the dominant ionizing sources more directly. OI absorbers have neutral hydrogen columns of 10^19-10^21 cm^-2, suggesting a close resemblance between objects selected in OI and HI absorption. Finally, the absorption in the foreground of the z=7.085 quasar ULASJ1120+0641 cannot originate in a dark matter halo because halo gas at the observed HI column density is enriched enough to violate the upper limits on the OI column. By contrast, gas at less than one third the cosmic mean density satisfies the constraints. Hence the foreground absorption likely originates in the IGM.
  • We present evidence for a skewed distribution of UV FeII emission in quasars within candidate overdense regions spanning spatial scales of ~ 50 Mpc at 1.11 < z < 1.67, compared to quasars in field environments at comparable redshifts. The overdense regions have an excess of high equivalent width sources (W2400 > 42 \AA), and a dearth of low equivalent width sources. There are various possible explanations for this effect, including dust, Ly\alpha fluorescence, microturbulence, and iron abundance. We find that the most plausible of these is enhanced iron abundance in the overdense regions, consistent with an enhanced star formation rate in the overdense regions compared to the field.
  • We have exploited the HST CANDELS WFC3/IR imaging to study the properties of (sub-)mm galaxies in GOODS-South. After using the deep radio and Spitzer imaging to identify galaxy counterparts for the (sub-)mm sources, we have used the new CANDELS data in two ways. First, we have derived improved photometric redshifts and stellar masses, confirming that the (sub-)mm galaxies are massive (<M*>=2.2x10^11 M_solar) galaxies at z=1-3. Second, we have exploited the depth and resolution of the WFC3/IR imaging to determine the sizes and morphologies of the galaxies at rest-frame optical wavelengths, fitting two-dimensional axi-symmetric Sersic models. Crucially, the WFC3/IR H-band imaging enables modelling of the mass-dominant galaxy, rather than the blue high-surface brightness features which often dominate optical (rest-frame UV) images of (sub-)mm galaxies, and can confuse visual morphological classification. As a result of this analysis we find that >95% of the rest-frame optical light in almost all of the (sub-)mm galaxies is well-described by either a single exponential disk, or a multiple-component system in which the dominant constituent is disk-like. We demonstrate that this conclusion is consistent with the results of high-quality ground-based K-band imaging, and explain why. The massive disk galaxies which host luminous (sub-)mm emission are reasonably extended (r_e=4 kpc), consistent with the sizes of other massive star-forming disks at z~2. In many cases we find evidence of blue clumps within the sources, with the mass-dominant disk becoming more significant at longer wavelengths. Finally, only a minority of the sources show evidence for a major galaxy-galaxy interaction. Taken together, these results support the view that most (sub-)mm galaxies at z~2 are simply the most extreme examples of normal star-forming galaxies at that era.
  • We use a suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations including a self-consistent treatment for inhomogeneous reionisation to study the impact of galactic outflows and photoionisation heating on the volume-averaged recombination rate of the intergalactic medium (IGM). By incorporating an evolving ionising escape fraction and a treatment for self-shielding within Lyman limit systems, we have run the first simulations of "photon-starved" reionisation scenarios that simultaneously reproduce observations of the abundance of galaxies, the optical depth to electron scattering of cosmic microwave background photons \tau, and the effective optical depth to Lyman\alpha absorption at z=5. We confirm that an ionising background reduces the clumping factor C by more than 50% by smoothing moderately-overdense (\Delta=1--100) regions. Meanwhile, outflows increase clumping only modestly. The clumping factor of ionised gas is much lower than the overall baryonic clumping factor because the most overdense gas is self-shielded. Photoionisation heating further suppresses recombinations if reionisation heats gas above the canonical 10,000 K. Accounting for both effects within our most realistic simulation, C rises from <1 at z>10 to 3.3 at z=6. We show that incorporating temperature- and ionisation-corrected clumping factors into an analytical reionisation model reproduces the numerical simulation's \tau to within 10%. Finally, we explore how many ionising photons are absorbed during the process of heating filaments by considering the overall photon cost of reionisation in analytical models that assume that the IGM is heated at different redshifts. For reionisation redshifts of 9--10, cold filaments boost the reionisation photon budget by ~1 photon per hydrogen atom.
  • We present two-dimensional, integral field spectroscopy covering the rest-frame wavelengths of strong optical emission lines in nine sub-mm-luminous galaxies (SMGs) at 2.0<z<2.7. The GEMINI-NIFS and VLT-SINFONI imaging spectroscopy allows the mapping of the gas morphologies and dynamics within the sources, and we measure an average Halpha velocity dispersion of sigma=220+-80km/s and an average half light radius of r=3.7+-0.8kpc. The average dynamical measure, V_obs/2sigma=0.9+-0.1 for the SMGs, is higher than in more quiescent star-forming galaxies at the same redshift, highlighting a difference in the dynamics of the two populations. The SMGs' far-infrared SFRs, measured using Herschel-SPIRE far-infrared photometry, are on average 370+-90Mo/yr which is ~2 times higher than the extinction corrected SFRs of the more quiescent star-forming galaxies. Six of the SMGs in our sample show strong evidence for kinematically distinct multiple components with average velocity offsets of 200+-100km/s and average projected spatial offsets of 8+-2kpc, which we attribute to systems in the early stages of major mergers. Indeed all SMGs are classified as mergers from a kinemetry analysis of the velocity and dispersion field asymmetry. We bring together our sample with seven other SMGs with IFU observations to describe the ionized gas morphologies and kinematics in a sample of 16 SMGs. By comparing the velocity and spatial offsets of the SMG Halpha components with sub-halo offsets in the Millennium simulation database we infer an average halo mass for SMGs of 13<log(M[h^-1Mo])<14. Finally we explore the relationship between the velocity dispersion and star formation intensity within the SMGs, finding the gas motions are consistent with the Kennicutt-Schmidt law and a range of extinction corrections, although might also be driven by the tidal torques from merging or even the star formation itself.
  • In this investigation we quantify the metallicities of low mass galaxies by constructing the most comprehensive census to date. We use galaxies from the SDSS and DEEP2 survey and estimate metallicities from their optical emission lines. We also use two smaller samples from the literature which have metallicities determined by the direct method using the temperature sensitive [OIII]4363 line. We examine the scatter in the local mass-metallicity (MZ) relation determined from ~20,000 star-forming galaxies in the SDSS and show that it is larger at lower stellar masses, consistent with the theoretical scatter in the MZ relation determined from hydrodynamical simulations. We determine a lower limit for the scatter in metallicities of galaxies down to stellar masses of ~10^7 M_solar that is only slightly smaller than the expected scatter inferred from the SDSS MZ relation and significantly larger than what is previously established in the literature. The average metallicity of star-forming galaxies increases with stellar mass. By examining the scatter in the SDSS MZ relation, we show that this is mostly due to the lowest metallicity galaxies. The population of low mass, metal-rich galaxies have properties which are consistent with previously identified galaxies that may be transitional objects between gas-rich dwarf irregulars and gas-poor dwarf spheroidals and ellipticals.
  • We carry out a new suite of cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulations and explore the relative impacts on reionization-epoch star formation of galactic outflows and photoionization heating. By itself, an extragalactic ultraviolet background (EUVB) suppresses the luminosity function by less than 50% at z=6, overproducing the observed galaxy abundance by a factor of 3-5. Galactic outflows restore agreement with observations without preventing Population II star formation from reionizing the Universe by z=6. The resulting EUVB suppresses star formation in halos with virial temperatures below 10^5K but has a weaker impact in more massive halos. Nonetheless, the low-mass halos contribute up to 50% of all ionizing photons owing to the EUVB's inhomogeneity. Overall, star formation rate scales as halo mass M_h to the 1.3-1.4 in halos with $M_h=10^{8.2--10.2}\msun$. This is a steeper dependence than is often assumed in reionization models, boosting the expected power spectrum of 21 centimeter fluctuations on large scales. The luminosity function rises steeply to at least M_1600=-13, indicating that reionization was driven by faint galaxies (M_1600 >= -15) that have not yet been observed. Our models cannot simultaneously explain observations of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, and the intergalactic medium. Increased dynamic range will alleviate the existing discrepancies, but observations may still require additional physics such as a variable ionizing escape fraction (abridged).
  • The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) project has collected more than a billion photometric measurements since 2005 January. These sky survey data-covering timescales from a fraction of a second to a few hundred days-are a useful source to study stellar variability. A total of 167 star fields, mostly along the ecliptic plane, have been selected for photometric monitoring with the TAOS telescopes. This paper presents our initial analysis of a search for periodic variable stars from the time-series TAOS data on one particular TAOS field, No. 151 (RA = 17$^{\rm h}30^{\rm m}6\fs$67, Dec = 27\degr17\arcmin 30\arcsec, J2000), which had been observed over 47 epochs in 2005. A total of 81 candidate variables are identified in the 3 square degree field, with magnitudes in the range 8 < R < 16. On the basis of the periodicity and shape of the lightcurves, 29 variables, 15 of which were previously unknown, are classified as RR Lyrae, Cepheid, delta Scuti, SX Phonencis, semi-regular and eclipsing binaries.
  • We present an analysis of the Ly-a forest toward 3C 273 from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph at ~7 km/s resolution, along with re-processed data from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. The high UV flux of 3C 273 allows us to probe the weak, low z absorbers. The main sample consists of 21 HI absorbers that we could discriminate to a sensitivity of log NHI~ 12.5. The redshift density for absorbers with 13.1<log NHI<14.0 is ~1.5 sigma below the mean for other lines of sight; for log NHI >= 12.5, it is consistent with numerical model predictions. The Doppler parameter distribution is consistent with other low z samples. We find no evidence for a break in the column density power-law distribution to log NHI=12.3. A broad Ly-a absorber (BLA) is within Delta v =< 50 km/s and 1.3 local frame Mpc of two ~0.5L* galaxies, with an OVI absorber ~700 km/s away, similarly close to three galaxies and indicating overdense environments. We detect clustering on the Delta v<1000 km/s scale at 3.4 sigma significance for log NHI >= 12.6, consistent with the level predicted from hydrodynamical simulations, and indication for a Ly-a forest void at 0.09<z<0.12. We find at least two components for the z=0.0053 Virgo absorber, but the total NHI column is not significantly changed.
  • We have analyzed the first 3.75 years of data from TAOS, the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey. TAOS monitors bright stars to search for occultations by Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). This dataset comprises 5e5 star-hours of multi-telescope photometric data taken at 4 or 5 Hz. No events consistent with KBO occultations were found in this dataset. We compute the number of events expected for the Kuiper Belt formation and evolution models of Pan & Sari (2005), Kenyon & Bromley (2004), Benavidez & Campo Bagatin (2009), and Fraser (2009). A comparison with the upper limits we derive from our data constrains the parameter space of these models. This is the first detailed comparison of models of the KBO size distribution with data from an occultation survey. Our results suggest that the KBO population is comprised of objects with low internal strength and that planetary migration played a role in the shaping of the size distribution.
  • We analyzed data accumulated during 2005 and 2006 by the Taiwan-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) in order to detect short-period variable stars (periods of <~ 1 hour) such as delta Scuti. TAOS is designed for the detection of stellar occultation by small-size Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and is operating four 50cm telescopes at an effective cadence of 5Hz. The four telescopes simultaneously monitor the same patch of the sky in order to reduce false positives. To detect short-period variables, we used the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm (FFT) inasmuch as the data points in TAOS light-curves are evenly spaced. Using FFT, we found 41 short-period variables with amplitudes smaller than a few hundredths of a magnitude and periods of about an hour, which suggest that they are low-amplitude delta Scuti stars (LADS). The light-curves of TAOS delta Scuti stars are accessible online at the Time Series Center website (http://timemachine.iic.harvard.edu)
  • We present the results of a search for occultation events by objects at distances between 100 and 1000 AU in lightcurves from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS). We searched for consecutive, shallow flux reductions in the stellar lightcurves obtained by our survey between 7 February 2005 and 31 December 2006 with a total of $\sim4.5\times10^{9}$ three-telescope simultaneous photometric measurements. No events were detected, allowing us to set upper limits on the number density as a function of size and distance of objects in Sedna-like orbits, using simple models.
  • We study the topology of reionization using accurate three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations post-processed on outputs from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. In our simulations, reionization begins in overdense regions and then "leaks" directly into voids, with filaments reionizing last owing to their combination of high recombination rate and low emissivity. This result depends on the uniquely-biased emissivity field predicted by our prescriptions for star formation and feedback, which have previously been shown to account for a wide array of measurements of the post-reionization Universe. It is qualitatively robust to our choice of simulation volume, ionizing escape fraction, and spatial resolution (in fact it grows stronger at higher spatial resolution) even though the exact overlap redshift is sensitive to each of these. However, it weakens slightly as the escape fraction is increased owing to the reduced density contrast at higher redshift. We also explore whether our results are sensitive to commonly-employed approximations such as using optically-thin Eddington tensors or substantially altering the speed of light. Such approximations do not qualitatively change the topology of reionization. However, they can systematically shift the overlap redshift by up to $\Delta z\sim 0.5$, indicating that accurate radiative transfer is essential for computing reionization. Our model cannot simultaneously reproduce the observed optical depth to Thomson scattering and ionization rate per hydrogen atom at $z=6$, which could owe to numerical effects and/or missing early sources of ionization.
  • The nature of galaxy structures on large scales is a key observational prediction for current models of galaxy formation. The SDSS and 2dF galaxy surveys have revealed a number of structures on 40-150 h^-1 Mpc scales at low redshifts, and some even larger ones. To constrain galaxy number densities, luminosities, and stellar populations in large structures at higher redshift, we have investigated two sheet-like structures of galaxies at z=0.8 and 1.3 spanning 150 h^-1 comoving Mpc embedded in large quasar groups extending over at least 200 h^-1 Mpc. We present first results of an analysis of these sheet--like structures using two contiguous 1deg GALEX fields (FUV and NUV) cross-correlated with optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We derive a sample of 462 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) candidates coincident with the sheets. Using the GALEX and SDSS data, we show that the overall average spectral energy distribution of a LBG galaxy at z~1 is flat (in f_lambda) in the rest frame wavelength range from 1500A, to 4000A, implying evolved populations of stars in the LBGs. From the luminosity functions we get indications for overdensities in the two LQGs compared to their foreground regions. Similar conclusions come from the calculation of the 2-point correlation function, showing a 2sigma overdensity for the LBGs in the z~0.8 LQG on scales of 1.6 to 4.8 Mpc, indicating similar correlation scales for our LBG sample as their z~3 counterparts.
  • The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) operates four fully automatic telescopes to search for occultations of stars by Kuiper Belt Objects. It is a versatile facility that is also useful for the study of initial optical GRB afterglows. This paper provides a detailed description of the TAOS multi-telescope system, control software, and high-speed imaging.
  • The star BD+29 1748 was resolved to be a close binary from its occultation by the asteroid 87 Sylvia on 2006 December 18 UT. Four telescopes were used to observe this event at two sites separated by some 80 km apart. Two flux drops were observed at one site, whereas only one flux drop was detected at the other. From the long-term variation of Sylvia, we inferred the probable shape of the shadow during the occultation, and this in turn constrains the binary parameters: the two components of BD+29 1748 have a projected separation of 0.097" to 0.110" on the sky with a position angle 104 deg to 107 deg. The asteroid was clearly resolved with a size scale ranging from 130 to 290 km, as projected onto the occultation direction. No occultation was detected for either of the two known moonlets of 87 Sylvia.
  • We introduce a new code for computing time-dependent continuum radiative transfer and non-equilibrium ionization states in static density fields with periodic boundaries. Our code solves the moments of the radiative transfer equation, closed by an Eddingtion tensor computed using a long characteristics method. We show that pure (i.e., not source-centered) short characteristics and the optically-thin approximation are inappropriate for computing Eddington factors for the problem of cosmological reionization. We evolve the non-equilibrium ionization field via an efficient and accurate (errors <1%) technique that switches between fully implicit or explicit finite-differencing depending on whether the local timescales are long or short compared to the timestep. We tailor our code for the problem of cosmological reionization. In tests, the code conserves photons, accurately treats cosmological effects, and reproduces analytic Stromgren sphere solutions. Its chief weakness is that the computation time for the long characteristics calculation scales relatively poorly compared to other techniques (t_{LC} \propto N_{cells}^1.5); however, we mitigate this by only recomputing the Eddington tensor when the radiation field changes substantially. Our technique makes almost no physical approximations, so it provides a way to benchmark faster but more approximate techniques. It can readily be extended to evolve multiple frequencies, though we do not do so here. Finally, we note that our method is generally applicable to any problem involving the transfer of continuum radiation through a periodic volume.
  • Results from the first two years of data from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) are presented. Stars have been monitored photometrically at 4 Hz or 5 Hz to search for occultations by small (~3 km) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). No statistically significant events were found, allowing us to present an upper bound to the size distribution of KBOs with diameters 0.5 km < D < 28 km.