• In this paper, we derive the fundamental properties of 1SWASPJ011351.29+314909.7 (J0113+31), a metal-poor (-0.40 +/- 0.04 dex), eclipsing binary in an eccentric orbit (~0.3) with an orbital period of ~14.277 d. Eclipsing M dwarfs orbiting solar-type stars (EBLMs), like J0113+31, have been identified from WASP light curves and follow-up spectroscopy in the course of the transiting planet search. We present the first binary of the EBLM sample to be fully analysed, and thus, define here the methodology. The primary component with a mass of 0.945 +/- 0.045 Msun has a large radius (1.378 +/- 0.058 Rsun) indicating that the system is quite old, ~9.5 Gyr. The M-dwarf secondary mass of 0.186 +/- 0.010 Msun and radius of 0.209 +/- 0.011 Rsun are fully consistent with stellar evolutionary models. However, from the near-infrared secondary eclipse light curve, the M dwarf is found to have an effective temperature of 3922 +/- 42 K, which is ~600 K hotter than predicted by theoretical models. We discuss different scenarios to explain this temperature discrepancy. The case of J0113+31 for which we can measure mass, radius, temperature and metallicity, highlights the importance of deriving mass, radius and temperature as a function of metallicity for M dwarfs to better understand the lowest mass stars. The EBLM Project will define the relationship between mass, radius, temperature and metallicity for M dwarfs providing important empirical constraints at the bottom of the main sequence.
  • The analysis of eclipsing binaries containing non-radial pulsators allows: i) to combine two different and independent sources of information on the internal structure and evolutionary status of the components, and ii) to study the effects of tidal forces on pulsations. KIC 3858884 is a bright Kepler target whose light curve shows deep eclipses, complex pulsation patterns with pulsation frequencies typical of {\delta} Sct, and a highly eccentric orbit. We present the result of the analysis of Kepler photometry and of high resolution phaseresolved spectroscopy. Spectroscopy yielded both the radial velocity curves and, after spectral disentangling, the primary component effective temperature and metallicity, and line-of-sight projected rotational velocities. The Kepler light curve was analyzed with an iterative procedure devised to disentangle eclipses from pulsations which takes into account the visibility of the pulsating star during eclipses. The search for the best set of binary parameters was performed combining the synthetic light curve models with a genetic minimization algorithm, which yielded a robust and accurate determination of the system parameters. The binary components have very similar masses (1.88 and 1.86 Msun) and effective temperatures (6800 and 6600 K), but different radii (3.45 and 3.05 Rsun). The comparison with the theoretical models evidenced a somewhat different evolutionary status of the components and the need of introducing overshooting in the models. The pulsation analysis indicates a hybrid nature of the pulsating (secondary) component, the corresponding high order g-modes might be excited by an intrinsic mechanism or by tidal forces.
  • The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.
  • We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object NIR APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations are used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey and results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that is publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present RVs and vsini of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsini precision of ~2 km/s and a measurement floor at vsini = 4 km/s. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for vsini and RV variability (at ~100-200 m/s), and will advance the target selection for planned RV and photometric searches for low mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as HPF, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and AO imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution H-band APOGEE spectra provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and RVs for over 1400 stars spanning spectral types of M0-L0, providing the largest set of NIR M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsini values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we hope to achieve a relative velocity precision floor of 50 m/s for bright M dwarfs. We present preliminary results of this telluric modeling technique in this paper.
  • We present observations of 36 late-M dwarfs obtained with the KeckII/NIRSPEC in the J-band at a resolution of \sim20,000. We have measured projected rotational velocities, absolute radial velocities, and pseudo-equivalent widths of atomic lines. 12 of our targets did not have previous measurements in the literature. For the other 24 targets, we confirm previously reported measurements. We find that 13 stars from our sample have vsini below our measurement threshold (12 km/s) whereas four of our targets are fast rotators (vsini > 30 km/s). As fast rotation causes spectral features to be washed out, stars with low projected rotational velocities are sought for radial velocity surveys. At our intermediate spectral resolution we have confirmed the identification of neutral atomic lines reported in Mclean et al. 2007. We also calculated pseudo-equivalent widths (p-EW) of 12 atomic lines. Our results confirm that the p-EW of K I lines are strongly dependent on spectral types. We observe that the p-EW of Fe I and Mn I lines remain fairly constant with later spectral type. We suggest that those lines are particularly suitable for deriving metallicities for late-M dwarfs.
  • (Abridged) We have obtained radial velocities of a sample of 18 ultracool dwarfs (M6.5-T8) using high-resolution, near-infrared spectra obtained with NIRSPEC and the Keck II telescope. We have confirmed that the radial velocity of Gl 570 D is coincident with that of the K-type primary star Gl 570 A, thus providing additional support for their true companionship. The presence of planetary-mass companions around 2MASS J05591914-1404488 (T4.5V) has been analyzed using five NIRSPEC radial velocity measurements obtained over a period of 4.37 yr. We have computed UVW space motions for a total of 21 L and T dwarfs within 20 pc of the Sun. This population shows UVW velocities that nicely overlap the typical kinematics of solar to M-type stars within the same spatial volume. However, the mean Galactic (44.2 km/s) and tangential (36.5 km/s) velocities of the L and T dwarfs appear to be smaller than those of G to M stars. A significant fraction (~40%) of the L and T dwarfs lies near the Hyades moving group (0.4-2 Gyr), which contrasts with the 10-12% found for earlier-type stellar neighbors. Additionally, the distributions of all three UVW components (sigma_{UVW} = 30.2, 16.5, 15.8 km/s) and the distributions of the total Galactic (sigma_{v_tot} = 19.1 km/s) and tangential (sigma_{v_t} = 17.6 km/s) velocities derived for the L and T dwarf sample are narrower than those measured for nearby G, K, and M-type stars, but similar to the dispersions obtained for F stars. This suggests that, in the solar neighborhood, the L- and T-type ultracool dwarfs in our sample (including brown dwarfs) is kinematically younger than solar-type to early M stars with likely ages in the interval 0.5-4 Gyr.
  • Using the low-resolution mode of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard the \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} (HST), we have obtained spatially resolved spectra of 20 ultracool dwarfs. 18 of them belong to 9 known very low-mass binary systems with angular separations in the range 0.37-0.098 arcseconds. We have derived spectral types in the range dM7.5 to dL6 from the PC3 index, and by comparing our STIS spectra with ground-based spectra of similar spectral resolution from Mart{\'\i}n et al. (1999). We have searched for H$_\alpha$ emission in each object but it was clearly detected in only 2 of them. We find that the distribution of H$_\alpha$ emission in our sample is statistically different from that of single field dwarfs, suggesting an intriguing anticorrelation between chromospheric activity and binarity for M7--M9.5 dwarfs. We provide measuments of the strength of the main photospheric features and the PC3 index, and we derive calibrations of spectral subclasses versus F814W and K-band absolute magnitudes for a subset of 10 dwarfs in 5 binaries that have known trigonometric parallaxes.
  • We have obtained projected rotation velocities (vsini) of a sample of 19 ultracool dwarfs with spectral types in the interval M6.5-T8 using high-resolution, near-infrared spectra obtained with NIRSPEC and the Keck II telescope. Among our targets there are two young brown dwarfs, two likely field stars, and fifteen likely brown dwarfs (30-72 Mjup) of the solar neighborhood. Our results indicate that the T-type dwarfs are fast rotators in marked contrast to M-type stars. We have derived vsini velocities between <15 and 40 km/s for them, and have found no clear evidence for T dwarfs rotating strongly faster than L dwarfs. However, there is a hint for an increasing lower envelope on moving from mid-M to the L spectral types in the vsini-spectral type diagram that was previously reported in the literature; our vsini results extend it to even cooler types. Assuming that field brown dwarfs have a size of 0.08-0.1 Rsol, we can place an upper limit of 12.5 h on the equatorial rotation period of T-type brown dwarfs. In addition, we have compared our vsini measurements to spectroscopic rotational velocities of very young brown dwarfs of similar mass available in the literature. The comparison, although model-dependent, suggests that brown dwarfs lose some angular momentum during their contraction; however, their spin down time seems to be significantly longer than that of solar-type to early-M stars.