• Two narrow and dense rings (called C1R and C2R) were discovered around the Centaur object (10199) Chariklo during a stellar occultation observed on 2013 June 3. Following this discovery, we planned observations of several occultations by Chariklo's system in order to better characterize the physical properties of the ring and main body. Here, we use 12 successful occulations by Chariklo observed between 2014 and 2016. They provide ring profiles (physical width, opacity, edge structure) and constraints on the radii and pole position. Our new observations are currently consistent with the circular ring solution and pole position, to within the $\pm 3.3$ km formal uncertainty for the ring radii derived by Braga-Ribas et al. The six resolved C1R profiles reveal significant width variations from $\sim 5$ to 7.5 km. The width of the fainter ring C2R is less constrained, and may vary between 0.1 and 1 km. The inner and outer edges of C1R are consistent with infinitely sharp boundaries, with typical upper limits of one kilometer for the transition zone between the ring and empty space. No constraint on the sharpness of C2R's edges is available. A 1$\sigma$ upper limit of $\sim 20$ m is derived for the equivalent width of narrow (physical width <4 km) rings up to distances of 12,000 km, counted in the ring plane.
  • May 30, 2017 astro-ph.EP
    We present a summary of the campaign of remote observations that supported the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission. Telescopes across the globe (and in space) followed comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from before Rosetta's arrival until nearly the end of mission in September 2016. These provided essential data for mission planning, large-scale context information for the coma and tails beyond the spacecraft, and a way to directly compare 67P with other comets. The observations revealed 67P to be a relatively `well behaved' comet, typical of Jupiter family comets and with activity patterns that repeat from orbit-to-orbit. Comparison between this large collection of telescopic observations and the in situ results from Rosetta will allow us to better understand comet coma chemistry and structure. This work is just beginning as the mission ends -- in this paper we present a summary of the ground-based observations and early results, and point to many questions that will be addressed in future studies.
  • We present results derived from four stellar occultations by the plutino object (208996) 2003~AZ$_{84}$, detected at January 8, 2011 (single-chord event), February 3, 2012 (multi-chord), December 2, 2013 (single-chord) and November 15, 2014 (multi-chord). Our observations rule out an oblate spheroid solution for 2003~AZ$_{84}$'s shape. Instead, assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, we find that a Jacobi triaxial solution with semi axes $(470 \pm 20) \times (383 \pm 10) \times (245 \pm 8)$~km % axis ratios $b/a= 0.82 \pm 0.05$ and $c/a= 0.52 \pm 0.02$, can better account for all our occultation observations. Combining these dimensions with the rotation period of the body (6.75~h) and the amplitude of its rotation light curve, we derive a density $\rho=0.87 \pm 0.01$~g~cm$^{-3}$ a geometric albedo $p_V= 0.097 \pm 0.009$. A grazing chord observed during the 2014 occultation reveals a topographic feature along 2003~AZ$_{84}$'s limb, that can be interpreted as an abrupt chasm of width $\sim 23$~km and depth $> 8$~km or a smooth depression of width $\sim 80$~km and depth $\sim 13$~km (or an intermediate feature between those two extremes).
  • The discovery that the centaur (10199) Chariklo possesses a ring system opens questions about their origin. We here asses the plausibility of different scenarios for the origin of the observed ring system. We first consider the possibility that the material of the ring originated in the disruption of a satellite that had reached a critical distance from the centaur. We discuss the conditions for the putative satellite to approach the centaur as a consequence of tidal interaction. A three-body encounter is also considered as a transport mechanism. In addition, we study the case in which the ring is formed by the ejecta of a cratering collision on the centaur and we constrain the collision parameters and the size of the resulting crater of the event. Finally, we consider that the ring material originates from a catastrophic collision between a background object and a satellite located at a distance corresponding to the the current location of the ring. We compute the typical timescales for these scenarios. We estimate that in order to be tidally disrupted a satellite would have had to be larger than approximately 6.5 km at the location of the rings. However the tidal interaction is rather weak for objects of the size of outer solar system bodies at the ring location, therefore we considered other more effective mechanisms by which a satellite migt have approached the centaur. Collisonal scenarios are both physically plausible for the formation, but semianalytical estimations indicate that the probability of the corresponding collisions is low under current conditions
  • We present time series photometry of Bienor in four observation campaigns from 2013 to 2016 and compare them with previous observations in the literature dating back to 2000. The results show a remarkable decline in the amplitude of the rotational light curve and in the absolute magnitude. This suggests that the angle between the rotation axis and the line of sight has changed noticeably during the last 16 years as Bienor orbits the Sun. From the light curve amplitude data we are able to determine the orientation of the rotation axis of Bienor ($\beta_p=50\pm3^{\circ}$, $\lambda_p=35\pm8^{\circ}$). We are also able to constrain the $b/a$ axial ratio of a triaxial Jacobi ellipsoidal body (with semi-axis $a>b>c$). The best fit is for $b/a=0.45\pm0.05$, which corresponds to a density value of $594^{+47}_{-35}$ kg$\,$m$^{-3}$ under the usual assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium and given that Bienor's rotational period is 9.17 h. However, the absolute magnitude of Bienor at several epochs is not well reproduced. We tested several explanations such as relaxing the hydrostatic equilibrium constraint, a large North-South asymmetry in the surface albedo of Bienor or even a ring system. When a ring system of similar characteristics to those of Chariklo and Chiron is included, we can fit both the light curve amplitude and absolute magnitude. In this case the derived axial ratio is modified to $b/a=0.37\pm0.10$. The implied density is $678^{+209}_{-100}$ kg$\,$m$^{-3}$. Also the existence of a ring is consistent with the spectroscopic detection of water ice on Bienor. Nevertheless the other explanations cannot be discarded.
  • The near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 2015 TB145 had a very close encounter with Earth at 1.3 lunar distances on October 31, 2015. We obtained 3-band mid-infrared observations with the ESO VLT-VISIR instrument and visual lightcurves during the close-encounter phase. The NEA has a (most likely) rotation period of 2.939 +/- 0.005 hours and the visual lightcurve shows a peak-to-peak amplitude of approximately 0.12+/-0.02 mag. We estimate a V-R colour of 0.56+/-0.05 mag from MPC database entries. Applying different phase relations to the available R-/V-band observations produced H_R = 18.6 mag (standard H-G calculations) or H_R = 19.2 mag & H_V = 19.8 mag (via the H-G12 procedure), with large uncertainties of approximately 1 mag. We performed a detailed thermophysical model analysis by using spherical and ellipsoidal shape models. The thermal properties are best explained by an equator-on (+/- ~30 deg) viewing geometry during our measurements with a thermal inertia in the range 250-700 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 (retrograde rotation) or above 500 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 (prograde rotation). We find that the NEA has a minimum size of 625 m, a maximum size of just below 700 m, and a slightly elongated shape with a/b ~1.1. The best match to all thermal measurements is found for: (i) Thermal inertia of 900 Jm-2s-0.5K-1; D_eff = 644 m, p_V = 5.5% (prograde rotation); regolith grain sizes of ~50-100 mm; (ii) thermal inertia of 400 Jm-2s-0.5K-1; D_eff = 667 m, p_V = 5.1% (retrograde rotation); regolith grain sizes of ~10-20 mm. A near-Earth asteroid model (NEATM) confirms an object size well above 600 m, significantly larger than early estimates based on radar measurements. We give recommendations for improved observing strategies for similar events in the future.
  • We present results from a multi-chord Pluto stellar occultation observed on 29 June 2015 from New Zealand and Australia. This occurred only two weeks before the NASA New Horizons flyby of the Pluto system and serves as a useful comparison between ground-based and space results. We find that Pluto's atmosphere is still expanding, with a significant pressure increase of 5$\pm$2\% since 2013 and a factor of almost three since 1988. This trend rules out, as of today, an atmospheric collapse associated with Pluto's recession from the Sun. A central flash, a rare occurrence, was observed from several sites in New Zealand. The flash shape and amplitude are compatible with a spherical and transparent atmospheric layer of roughly 3~km in thickness whose base lies at about 4~km above Pluto's surface, and where an average thermal gradient of about 5 K~km$^{-1}$ prevails. We discuss the possibility that small departures between the observed and modeled flash are caused by local topographic features (mountains) along Pluto's limb that block the stellar light. Finally, using two possible temperature profiles, and extrapolating our pressure profile from our deepest accessible level down to the surface, we obtain a possible range of 11.9-13.7~$\mu$bar for the surface pressure.
  • Context: Accurate measurements of diameters of trans-Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Thermal modeling can provide good results, but accurate absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain the thermal models and derive diameters and geometric albedos. The absolute magnitude, Hv, is defined as the magnitude of the object reduced to unit helio- and geocentric distances and a zero solar phase angle and is determined using phase curves. Phase coefficients can also be obtained from phase curves. These are related to surface properties, yet not many are known. Aims: Our objective is to measure accurate V band absolute magnitudes and phase coefficients for a sample of trans-Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modeled, within the 'TNOs are cool' program, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects. Methods: We observed 56 objects using the V and R filters. These data, along with those available in the literature, were used to obtain phase curves and measure V band absolute magnitudes and phase coefficients by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. Results: We obtained 237 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, six of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 110 absolute magnitudes with their respective phase coefficients. The average value of Hv is 6.39, bracketed by a minimum of 14.60 and a maximum of -1.12. In the case of the phase coefficients we report 0.10 mag per degree as the median value and a very large dispersion, ranging from -0.88 up tp 1.35 mag per degree.
  • The prediction of stellar occultations by Transneptunian objects and Centaurs is a difficult challenge that requires accuracy both in the occulted star position as for the object ephemeris. Until now, the most used method of prediction involving tens of TNOs/Centaurs was to consider a constant offset for the right ascension and for the declination with respect to a reference ephemeris. This offset is determined as the difference between the most recent observations of the TNO and the reference ephemeris. This method can be successfully applied when the offset remains constant with time. This paper presents an alternative method of prediction based on a new accurate orbit determination procedure, which uses all the available positions of the TNO from the Minor Planet Center database plus sets of new astrometric positions from unpublished observations. The orbit determination is performed through a numerical integration procedure (NIMA), in which we develop a specific weighting scheme. The NIMA method was applied for 51 selected TNOs/Centaurs. For this purpose, we have performed about 2900 new observations during 2007-2014. Using NIMA, we succeed in predicting the stellar occultations of 10 TNOs and 3 Centaurs between 2013 and 2015. By comparing the NIMA and JPL ephemerides, we highlighted the variation of the offset between them with time. Giving examples, we show that the constant offset method could not accurately predict 6 out of the 13 observed positive occultations successfully predicted by NIMA. The results indicate that NIMA is capable of efficiently refine the orbits of these bodies. Finally, we show that the astrometric positions given by positive occultations can help to further refine the orbit of the TNO and consequently the future predictions. We also provide the unpublished observations of the 51 selected TNOs and their ephemeris in a usable format by the SPICE library.
  • We propose that several short duration events observed in past stellar occultations by Chiron were produced by rings material. From a reanalysis of the stellar occultation data in the literature we determined two possible orientations of the pole of Chiron's rings, with ecliptic coordinates l=(352+/-10) deg, b=(37+/-10) deg or l=(144+/-10) deg, b=(24+/-10) deg . The mean radius of the rings is (324 +/- 10) km. One can use the rotational lightcurve amplitude of Chiron at different epochs to distinguish between the two solutions for the pole. Both imply lower lightcurve amplitude in 2013 than in 1988, when the rotational lightcurve was first determined. We derived Chiron's rotational lightcurve in 2013 from observations at the 1.23-m CAHA telescope and indeed its amplitude is smaller than in 1988. We also present a rotational lightcurve in 2000 from images taken at CASLEO 2.15-m telescope that is consistent with our predictions. Out of the two poles the l=(144+/-10) deg, b=(24+/-10) deg solution provides a better match to a compilation of rotational lightcurve amplitudes from the literature and those presented here. We also show that using this preferred pole, Chiron's long term brightness variations are compatible with a simple model that incorporates the changing brightness of the rings as the tilt angle with respect to the Earth changes with time. Also, the variability of the water ice band in Chiron's spectra in the literature can be explained to a large degree by an icy ring system whose tilt angle changes with time and whose composition includes water ice, analogously to the case of Chariklo. We present several possible formation scenarios for the rings from qualitative points of view and speculate on the reasons why rings might be common in centaurs. We speculate on whether the known bimodal color distribution of centaurs could be due to presence of rings and lack of them.
  • Until now, rings have been detected in the Solar System exclusively around the four giant planets. Here we report the discovery of the first minor-body ring system around the Centaur object (10199) Chariklo, a body with equivalent radius 124$\pm$9 km. A multi-chord stellar occultation revealed the presence of two dense rings around Chariklo, with widths of about 7 km and 3 km, optical depths 0.4 and 0.06, and orbital radii 391 and 405 km, respectively. The present orientation of the ring is consistent with an edge-on geometry in 2008, thus providing a simple explanation for the dimming of Chariklo's system between 1997 and 2008, and for the gradual disappearance of ice and other absorption features in its spectrum over the same period. This implies that the rings are partially composed of water ice. These rings may be the remnants of a debris disk, which were possibly confined by embedded kilometre-sized satellites.
  • In this work we aim to study if the variability in the absolute magnitude of Chariklo and the temporal variation of the spectral ice feature, even its disappearance in 2007, can be explained by an icy ring system whose aspect angle changes with time. We modeled the light reflected by a system as the one described above to explain the variations on the absolute magnitude of Chariklo and its rings. Using X-Shooter at VLT we obtained a new reflectance spectra, here we compared this new set of data with the ones available in the literature. We showed how the water ice feature is visible in 2013 in accordance with the ring configuration, which had an opening angle of nearly 34$^o$ in 2013. Finally we also used models of the scattering of light to fit the visible and near-infrared spectra showing different characteristic to obtain information on the composition of Chariklo and its rings. {We showed that past absolute photometry of Chariklo from the literature and new photometric data that we obtained in 2013 can be explained by a ring of particles whose opening angle changes as a function of time. We used the two possible pole solutions for the ring system and found that only one of them, $\alpha$=151.30$\pm0.5$, $\delta=41.48\pm0.2$ $^o$ ($\lambda=137.9\pm0.5$, $\beta=27.7\pm0.2$ $^o$) provides the right variation of the aspect angle with time to explain the photometry, whereas the other possible pole solution fails to explain the photometry. From spectral modeling, using the result on the pole solution, we derived the composition of Chariklo surface and of that of the rings. Chariklo surface is composed by nearly 60% of amorphous carbon, 30% of silicates and 10\% of organics, no water ice was found on the surface. Whereas the ring contains 20% of water ice, 40-70% of silicates and 10-30% of tholins and small quantities of amorphous carbon.
  • Centaurs are the transitional population between trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Jupiter-family comets. For this reason it is possible to access the smaller ones, which is more difficult to do with the TNO population. The goal of this work is to characterize a set of 16 Centaurs in terms of their size, albedo, and thermal properties. We study the correlations, for a more extended sample obtained from the literature, of diameter, albedo, orbital parameters, and spectral slopes. We performed three-band photometric observations using Herschel-PACS and used a consistent method for the data reduction and aperture photometry of this sample to obtain monochromatic flux densities at 70, 100, and 160 $\mu$m. Additionally, we used Spitzer-MIPS flux densities at 24 and 70 $\mu$m when available. We also included in our Centaur sample scattered disk objects (SDOs), a dynamical family of TNOS, using results previously published by our team, and some Centaurs observed only with the Spitzer/MIPS instrument. We have determined new radiometric sizes and albedos of 16 Centaurs. The first conclusion is that the albedos of Centaur objects are not correlated with their orbital parameters. Similarly, there is no correlation between diameter and orbital parameters. Most of the objects in our sample are dark (pv < 7%) and most of them are small (D < 120km). However, there is no correlation between albedo and diameter, in particular for the group of the small objects as albedo values are homogeneously distributed between 4 to 16%. The correlation with the color of the objects showed that red objects are all small (mean diameter 65 km), while the gray ones span a wide range of sizes (mean diameter 120 km). Moreover, the gray objects tend to be darker, with a mean albedo of 5.6%, compared with a mean of 8.5% (ranging from 5 to 15%) for the red objects.
  • Near-Earth asteroid 2012 DA14 made its closest approach on February 15, 2013, when it passed at a distance of 27,700 km from the Earth's surface. It was the first time an asteroid of moderate size was predicted to approach that close to the Earth, becoming bright enough to permit a detailed study from ground-based telescopes. Asteroid 2012 DA14 was poorly characterized before its closest approach. We acquired data using several telescopes on four Spanish observatories: the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), both in the El Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (ORM, La Palma); the 2.2m CAHA telescope, in the Calar Alto Observatory (Almeria); the f/3 0.77m telescope in the La Hita Observatory (Toledo); and the f/8 1.5m telescope in the Sierra Nevada Observatory (OSN, Granada). We obtained visible and near-infrared color photometry, visible spectra and time-series photometry. Visible spectra together with color photometry of 2012 DA14 show that it can be classified as an L-type asteroid, a rare spectral type with a composition similar to that of carbonaceous chondrites. The time-series photometry provides a rotational period of 8.95 +- 0.08 hours after the closest approach, and there are indications that the object suffered a spin-up during this event. The large amplitude of the light curve suggests that the object is very elongated and irregular, with an equivalent diameter of around 18m. We obtain an absolute magnitude of H_R = 24.5 +- 0.2, corresponding to H_V = 25.0 +- 0.2. The GTC photometry also gives H_V = 25.29 +- 0.14. Both values agree with the value listed at the Minor Planet Center shortly after discovery. From the absolute photometry, together with some constraints on size and shape, we compute a geometric albedo of p_V = 0.44 +- 0.20, which is slightly above the range of albedos known for L-type asteroids (0.082 - 0.405).
  • Transneptunian objects (TNOs) are bodies populating the Kuiper Belt and they are believed to retain the most pristine and least altered material of the solar system. The Herschel Open Time Key Program entitled "TNOs are Cool: A survey of the trans-Neptunian region" has been awarded 373 h to investigate the albedo, size distribution and thermal properties of TNOs and Centaurs. Here we focus on the brightest targets observed by both the PACS and SPIRE multiband photometers: the dwarf planet Haumea, six TNOs (Huya, Orcus, Quaoar, Salacia, 2002 UX25, and 2002 TC302), and two Centaurs (Chiron and Chariklo). Flux densities are derived from PACS and SPIRE instruments using optimised data reduction methods. The spectral energy distribution obtained with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments over 6 bands (centred at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 $\mu$m), and with Spitzer-MIPS at 23.7 and 71.4 $\mu$m has been modelled with the NEATM thermal model in order to derive the albedo, diameter, and beaming factor. For the Centaurs Chiron and Chariklo and for the 1000 km sized Orcus and Quaoar, a thermophysical model was also run to better constrain their thermal properties. We derive the size, albedo, and thermal properties, including thermal inertia and surface emissivity, for the 9 TNOs and Centaurs. Several targets show a significant decrease in their spectral emissivity longwards of $\sim$300 $\mu$m and especially at 500 $\mu$m. Using our size estimations and the mass values available in the literature, we also derive the bulk densities for the binaries Quaoar/Weywot (2.18$^{+0.43}_{-0.36}$ g/cm$^3$), Orcus/Vanth (1.53$^{+0.15}_{-0.13}$ g/cm$^3$), and Salacia/Actea (1.29$^{+0.29}_{-0.23}$ g/cm$^3$). Quaoar's density is similar to that of the other dwarf planets Pluto and Haumea, and its value implies high contents of refractory materials mixed with ices.
  • 2012 DR30 is a recently discovered Solar System object on a unique orbit, with a high eccentricity of 0.9867, a perihelion distance of 14.54 AU and a semi-major axis of 1109 AU, in this respect outscoring the vast majority of trans-Neptunian objects. We performed Herschel/PACS and optical photometry to uncover the size and albedo of 2012 DR30, together with its thermal and surface properties. The body is 185 km in diameter and has a relatively low V-band geometric albedo of ~8%. Although the colours of the object indicate that 2012 DR30 is an RI taxonomy class TNO or Centaur, we detected an absorption feature in the Z-band that is uncommon among these bodies. A dynamical analysis of the target's orbit shows that 2012 DR30 moves on a relatively unstable orbit and was most likely only recently placed on its current orbit from the most distant and still highly unexplored regions of the Solar System. If categorised on dynamical grounds 2012 DR30 is the largest Damocloid and/or high inclination Centaur observed so far.
  • We present our latest results about the short-term variability of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). We performed broad-band CCD photometric observations using several telescopes in Spain and Chile. We present results based on three years of observations and report the short-term variability of 10 TNOs. Our sample of studied targets contains classical objects: (275809) 2001 QY297, (307251) 2002 KW14, (55636) 2002 TX300, 2004 NT33, (230965) 2004 XA192, and (202421) 2005 UQ513, a resonant body: (84522) 2002 TC302, a scattered target: (44594) 1999 OX3, and two detached objects: (145480) 2005 TB190, and (40314) 1999 KR16. For each target, light curves as well as possible rotation periods and photometric amplitudes are reported. The majority of the observed objects present a low peak-to-peak amplitude, <0.15mag. Only two objects exhibit light curve amplitudes higher than 0.15mag: (275809) 2001 QY297, and (307251) 2002 KW14. We remark two biases in the literature, previously studied in Thirouin et al. (2010) and confirmed by this new study: a bias towards objects with a small amplitude light curve and a second one against objects with a long rotational period in the data base of published rotational periods. We derived constraints on physical properties of some targets. We also report the solar phase curves of (40314) 1999 KR16, and (44594) 1999 OX3 for solar phase angles from 0 degree to around 2 degrees. Part of our discussion is focused on the study of (275809) 2001 QY297 which turned out to be an asynchronous binary system.
  • Trans-Neptunian objects (TNO) represent the leftovers of the formation of the Solar System. Their physical properties provide constraints to the models of formation and evolution of the various dynamical classes of objects in the outer Solar System. Based on a sample of 19 classical TNOs we determine radiometric sizes, geometric albedos and beaming parameters. Our sample is composed of both dynamically hot and cold classicals. We study the correlations of diameter and albedo of these two subsamples with each other and with orbital parameters, spectral slopes and colors. We have done three-band photometric observations with Herschel/PACS and we use a consistent method for data reduction and aperture photometry of this sample to obtain monochromatic flux densities at 70.0, 100.0 and 160.0 \mu m. Additionally, we use Spitzer/MIPS flux densities at 23.68 and 71.42 \mu m when available, and we present new Spitzer flux densities of eight targets. We derive diameters and albedos with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM). As auxiliary data we use reexamined absolute visual magnitudes from the literature and data bases, part of which have been obtained by ground based programs in support of our Herschel key program. We have determined for the first time radiometric sizes and albedos of eight classical TNOs, and refined previous size and albedo estimates or limits of 11 other classicals. The new size estimates of 2002 MS4 and 120347 Salacia indicate that they are among the 10 largest TNOs known. Our new results confirm the recent findings that there are very diverse albedos among the classical TNOs and that cold classicals possess a high average albedo (0.17 +/- 0.04). Diameters of classical TNOs strongly correlate with orbital inclination in our sample. We also determine the bulk densities of six binary TNOs.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T90 ~ 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z= 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray, which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. By fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/gamma-ray spectra, it traces the gamma-ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + SSC scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (~ 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise (alpha ~ 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow lightcurves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high quality prompt emission and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball shock model to extract valuable information about the GRB including the radiation mechanism, radius of prompt emission R, initial Lorentz factor of the outflow, the composition of the ejecta, as well as the collimation angle and the total energy budget.
  • We present Herschel PACS photometry of 18 Plutinos and determine sizes and albedos for these objects using thermal modeling. We analyze our results for correlations, draw conclusions on the Plutino size distribution, and compare to earlier results. Flux densities are derived from PACS mini scan-maps using specialized data reduction and photometry methods. In order to improve the quality of our results, we combine our PACS data with existing Spitzer MIPS data where possible, and refine existing absolute magnitudes for the targets. The physical characterization of our sample is done using a thermal model. Uncertainties of the physical parameters are derived using customized Monte Carlo methods. The correlation analysis is performed using a bootstrap Spearman rank analysis. We find the sizes of our Plutinos to range from 150 to 730 km and geometric albedos to vary between 0.04 and 0.28. The average albedo of the sample is 0.08 \pm 0.03, which is comparable to the mean albedo of Centaurs, Jupiter Family comets and other Trans-Neptunian Objects. We were able to calibrate the Plutino size scale for the first time and find the cumulative Plutino size distribution to be best fit using a cumulative power law with q = 2 at sizes ranging from 120-400 km and q = 3 at larger sizes. We revise the bulk density of 1999 TC36 and find a density of 0.64 (+0.15/-0.11) g cm-3. On the basis of a modified Spearman rank analysis technique our Plutino sample appears to be biased with respect to object size but unbiased with respect to albedo. Furthermore, we find biases based on geometrical aspects and color in our sample. There is qualitative evidence that icy Plutinos have higher albedos than the average of the sample.
  • Physical characterization of Trans-Neptunian objects, a primitive population of the outer solar system, may provide constraints on their formation and evolution. The goal of this work is to characterize a set of 15 scattered disk (SDOs) and detached objects, in terms of their size, albedo, and thermal properties. Thermal flux measurements obtained with the Herschel-PACS instrument at 70, 100 and 160 \mu m, and whenever applicable, with Spitzer-MIPS at 24 and 70 \mu m, are modeled with radiometric techniques, in order to derive the objects' individual size, albedo and when possible beaming factor. Error bars are obtained from a Monte-Carlo approach. We look for correlations between these and other physical and orbital parameters. Diameters obtained for our sample range from 100 to 2400 km, and the geometric albedos (in V band) vary from 3.8 % to 84.5 %. The unweighted mean V geometric albedo for the whole sample is 11.2 % (excluding Eris); 6.9 % for the SDOs, and 17.0 % for the detached objects (excluding Eris). We obtain new bulk densities for three binary systems: Ceto/Phorcys, Typhon/Echidna and Eris/Dysnomia. Apart from correlations clearly due to observational bias, we find significant correlations between albedo and diameter (more reflective objects being bigger), and between albedo, diameter and perihelion distance (brighter and bigger objects having larger perihelia). We discuss possible explanations for these correlations.
  • We present several lines of evidence based on different kinds of observations to conclude that rotational fission has likely occurred for a fraction of the known Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs). It is also likely that a number of binary systems have formed from that process in the trans-neptunian belt. We show that Haumea is a potential example of an object that has suffered a rotational fission. Its current fast spin would be a slight evolution of a primordial fast spin, rather than the result of a catastrophic collision, because the percentage of objects rotating faster than 4 hours would not be small in a maxwellian distribution of spin rates that fits the current TNO rotation database. On the other hand, the specific total angular momentum of Haumea and its satellites falls close to that of the high size ratio asteroid binaries, which are thought to be the result of rotational fissions or mass shedding. We also present N-body simulations of rotational fissions applied to the case of Haumea, which show that this process is feasible, might have generated satellites, and might have even created a "family" of bodies orbitally associated to Haumea. The orbitally associated bodies may come from the direct ejection of fragments according to our simulations, or through the evolution of a proto-satellite formed during the fission event. Also, the disruption of an escaped fragment after the fission might create the orbitally related bodies. If any of those mechanisms are correct, other rotational fission families may be detectable in the trans-neptunian belt in the future, and perhaps even TNO pairs might be found (pairs of bodies sharing very similar orbital elements, but not bound together).
  • From CCD observations of a fixed and large star field that contained the binary TNO Orcus, we have been able to derive high-precision relative astrometry and photometry of the Orcus system with respect to background stars. The RA residuals of an orbital fit to the astrometric data revealed a periodicity of 9.7+-0.3 days, which is what one would expect to be induced by the known Orcus companion. The residuals are also correlated with the theoretical positions of the satellite with regard to the primary. We therefore have revealed the presence of Orcus' satellite in our astrometric measurements. The photocenter motion is much larger than the motion of Orcus around the barycenter, and we show here that detecting some binaries through a carefully devised astrometric technique might be feasible with telescopes of moderate size. We also analyzed the system's mid-term photometry to determine whether the rotation could be tidally locked to the satellite's orbital period. We found that a photometric variability of 9.7+-0.3 days is clear in our data, and is nearly coincident with the orbital period of the satellite. We believe this variability might be induced by the satellite's rotation. There is also a slight hint for an additional small variability in the 10 hr range that was already reported in the literature. This short-term variability would indicate that the primary is not tidally locked and therefore the system would not have reached a double synchronous state. Implications for the basic physical properties of the primary and its satellite are discussed. From angular momentum considerations we suspect that the Orcus satellite might have formed from a rotational fission. This requires that the mass of the satellite would be around 0.09 times that of the primary, close to the value that one derives by using an albedo of 0.12 for the satellite and assuming equal densities for both objects.
  • The goal of the paper is to present new results on light echoes from young stellar objects. Broad band CCD images were obtained over three months at one-to-two week intervals for the field of NGC 6726, using the large field-of-view remotely-operated telescope on top of Cerro Burek. We detected scattered light echoes around two young, low-amplitude, irregular variable stars. Observations revealed not just one, but multiple light echoes from brightness pulses of the T Tauri star S CrA and the Herbig Ae/Be star R CrA. Analysis of S CrA's recurring echoes suggests that the star is located 138 +/- 16 pc from Earth, making these the closest echoes ever detected. The environment that scatters the stellar light from S CrA is compatible with an incomplete dust shell or an inclined torus some 10,000 AU in radius and containing $\sim$ $2 \times 10^{-3}$ $M_{\sun}$ of dust. The cause of such concentration at $\sim$ 10,000AU from the star is unknown. It could be the remnant of the envelope from which the star formed, but the distance of the cloud is remarkably similar to the nominal distance of the Oort cloud to the Sun, leading us to also speculate that the dust (or ice) seen around S CrA might have the same origin as the Solar System Oort cloud.
  • Thermal emission from Kuiper Belt object (136108) Haumea was measured with Herschel-PACS at 100 and 160 micrometers for almost a full rotation period. Observations clearly indicate a 100-micrometer thermal lightcurve with an amplitude of a factor of ~ 2, which is positively correlated with the optical lightcurve. This confirms that both are primarily due to shape effects. A 160-micrometer lightcurve is marginally detected. Radiometric fits of the mean Herschel- and Spitzer- fluxes indicate an equivalent diameter D ~ 1300 km and a geometric albedo p_v ~ 0.70-0.75. These values agree with inferences from the optical lightcurve, supporting the hydrostatic equilibrium hypothesis. The large amplitude of the 100-micrometer lightcurve suggests that the object has a high projected a/b axis ratio (~ 1.3) and a low thermal inertia as well as possible variable infrared beaming. This may point to fine regolith on the surface, with a lunar-type photometric behavior. The quality of the thermal data is not sufficient to clearly detect the effects of a surface dark spot.