• We present Gemini/GNIRS spectroscopy of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4388, with simultaneous coverage from 0.85 - 2.5 $\mu$m. Several spatially-extended emission lines are detected for the first time, both in the obscured and unobscured portion of the optical narrow line region (NLR), allowing us to assess the combined effects of the central continuum source, outflowing gas and shocks generated by the radio jet on the central 280 pc gas. The HI and [FeII] lines allow us to map the extinction affecting the NLR. We found that the nuclear region is heavily obscured, with E(B-V) ~1.9 mag. To the NE of the nucleus and up to ~150 pc, the extinction remains large, ~1 mag or larger, consistent with the system of dust lanes seen in optical imaging. We derived position-velocity diagrams for the most prominent lines as well as for the stellar component. Only the molecular gas and the stellar component display a well-organized pattern consistent with disk rotation. Other emission lines are kinematically perturbed or show little evidence of rotation. Extended high-ionization emission of sulfur, silicon and calcium is observed to distances of at least 200 pc both NE and SW of the nucleus. We compared flux ratios between these lines with photoionization models and conclude that radiation from the central source alone cannot explain the observed high-ionization spectrum. Shocks between the radio-jet and the ambient gas are very likely an additional source of excitation. We conclude that NGC 4388 is a prime laboratory to study the interplay between all these mechanisms.
  • We present an atlas of mid-infrared (mid-IR) ~7.5-13micron spectra of 45 local active galactic nuclei (AGN) obtained with CanariCam on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) as part of an ESO/GTC large program. The sample includes Seyferts and other low luminosity AGN (LLAGN) at a median distance of 35Mpc and luminous AGN, namely PG quasars, (U)LIRGs, and radio galaxies (RG) at a median distance of 254Mpc. To date, this is the largest mid-IR spectroscopic catalog of local AGN at sub-arcsecond resolution (median 0.3arcsec). The goal of this work is to give an overview of the spectroscopic properties of the sample. The nuclear 12micron luminosities of the AGN span more than four orders of magnitude, nu*Lnu(12micron)~ 3e41-1e46erg/s. In a simple mid-IR spectral index vs. strength of the 9.7micron silicate feature diagram most LLAGN, Seyfert nuclei, PG quasars, and RGs lie in the region occupied by clumpy torus model tracks. However, the mid-IR spectra of some might include contributions from other mechanisms. Most (U)LIRG nuclei in our sample have deeper silicate features and flatter spectral indices than predicted by these models suggesting deeply embedded dust heating sources and/or contribution from star formation. The 11.3micron PAH feature is clearly detected in approximately half of the Seyfert nuclei, LLAGN, and (U)LIRGs. While the RG, PG quasars, and (U)LIRGs in our sample have similar nuclear 12micron luminosities, we do not detect nuclear PAH emission in the RGs and PG quasars.
  • Spectra of the archetypal Type II Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 in a narrow wavelength interval near 3.7 microns have revealed a weak absorption feature due to two lines of the molecular ion H3+. The observed wavelength of the feature corresponds to velocity of -70 km/s relative to the systemic velocity of the galaxy, implying an outward flow from the nucleus along the line of sight. The absorption by H3+ along with the previously known broad hydrocarbon absorption at 3.4~microns probably are formed in diffuse gas that is in close proximity to the continuum source, i.e. within a few tens of parsecs of the central engine. Based on that conclusion and the measured H3+ absorption velocity and with the assumption of a spherically symmetric wind we estimate a rate of mass outflow from the AGN of ~1 Msun/yr.
  • We present J' and K' imaging linear polarimetric adaptive optics observations of NGC 1068 using MMT-Pol on the 6.5-m MMT. These observations allow us to study the torus from a magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) framework. In a 0.5" (30 pc) aperture at K', we find that polarisation arising from the passage of radiation from the inner edge of the torus through magnetically aligned dust grains in the clumps is the dominant polarisation mechanism, with an intrinsic polarisation of 7.0%$\pm$2.2%. This result yields a torus magnetic field strength in the range of 4$-$82 mG through paramagnetic alignment, and 139$^{+11}_{-20}$ mG through the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The measured position angle (P.A.) of polarisation at K$'$ is found to be similar to the P.A. of the obscuring dusty component at few parsec scales using infrared interferometric techniques. We show that the constant component of the magnetic field is responsible for the alignment of the dust grains, and aligned with the torus axis onto the plane of the sky. Adopting this magnetic field configuration and the physical conditions of the clumps in the MHD outflow wind model, we estimate a mass outflow rate $\le$0.17 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ at 0.4 pc from the central engine for those clumps showing near-infrared dichroism. The models used were able to create the torus in a timescale of $\geq$10$^{5}$ yr with a rotational velocity of $\leq$1228 km s$^{-1}$ at 0.4 pc. We conclude that the evolution, morphology and kinematics of the torus in NGC 1068 can be explained within a MHD framework.
  • We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\lambda}1.0693 {\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a "transitional" event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest composition and density of the inner core similar to that of 91bg-like events, and a deep reaching carbon burning layer not observed in slower declining SNe Ia. There is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II {\lambda}0.6355 {\mu}m line, implying a long dark phase of ~ 4 days.
  • We present spectra of the nuclear regions of 50 nearby (D = 1 - 92 Mpc, median = 20 Mpc) galaxies of morphological types E to Sm. The spectra, obtained with the Gemini Near-IR Spectrograph on the Gemini North telescope, cover a wavelength range of approximately 0.85-2.5 microns at R~1300--1800. There is evidence that most of the galaxies host an active galactic nucleus (AGN), but the range of AGN luminosities (log (L2-10 keV [erg/s]) = 37.0-43.2) in the sample means that the spectra display a wide variety of features. Some nuclei, especially the Seyferts, exhibit a rich emission-line spectrum. Other objects, in particular the type 2 Low Ionisation Nuclear Emission Region galaxies, show just a few, weak emission lines, allowing a detailed view of the underlying stellar population. These spectra display numerous absorption features sensitive to the stellar initial mass function, as well as molecular bands arising in cool stars, and many other atomic absorption lines. We compare the spectra of subsets of galaxies known to be characterised by intermediate-age and old stellar populations, and find clear differences in their absorption lines and continuum shapes. We also examine the effect of atmospheric water vapor on the signal-to-noise ratio achieved in regions between the conventional NIR atmospheric windows, of potential interest to those planning observations of redshifted emission lines or other features affected by telluric H2O. Further exploitation of this data set is in progress, and the reduced spectra and data reduction tools are made available to the community.
  • Gemini's Fast Turnaround program is intended to greatly decrease the time from having an idea to acquiring the supporting data. The scheme will offer monthly proposal submission opportunities, and proposals will be reviewed by the principal investigators or co-investigators of other proposals submitted during the same round. Here, we set out the design of the system and outline the plan for its implementation, leading to the launch of a pilot program at Gemini North in January 2015.
  • We present Gran Telescopio CANARIAS CanariCam 8.7$\mu$m imaging and 7.5-13$\mu$m spectroscopy of six local systems known to host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and have nuclear star formation. Our main goal is to investigate whether the molecules responsible for the 11.3$\mu$m polyclyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature are destroyed in the close vicinity of an AGN. We detect 11.3$\mu$m PAH feature emission in the nuclear regions of the galaxies as well as extended PAH emission over a few hundred parsecs. The equivalent width (EW) of the feature shows a minimum at the nucleus but increases with increasing radial distances, reaching typical star-forming values a few hundred parsecs away from the nucleus. The reduced nuclear EW are interpreted as due to increased dilution from the AGN continuum rather than destruction of the PAH molecules. We conclude that at least those molecules responsible for the 11.3$\mu$m PAH feature survive in the nuclear environments as close as 10pc from the AGN and for Seyfert-like AGN luminosities. We propose that material in the dusty tori, nuclear gas disks, and/or host galaxies of AGN is likely to provide the column densities necessary to protect the PAH molecules from the AGN radiation field.
  • We present mid-infrared (MIR) 8-13micron spectroscopy of the nuclear regions of the interacting galaxy Arp299 (IC694+NGC3690) obtained with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The high angular resolution (~0.3-0.6arcsec) of the data allows us to probe nuclear physical scales between 60 and 120pc, which is a factor of 10 improvement over previous MIR spectroscopic observations of this system. The GTC/CC spectroscopy displays evidence of deeply embedded Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) activity in both nuclei. The GTC/CC nuclear spectrum of NGC3690/Arp299-B1 can be explained as emission from AGN-heated dust in a clumpy torus with both a high covering factor and high extinction along the line of sight. The estimated bolometric luminosity of the AGN in NGC3690 is 3.2(+/-0.6)x10^44 erg/s. The nuclear GTC/CC spectrum of IC694/Arp299-A shows 11.3micron polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission stemming from a deeply embedded (A_V~24mag) region of less than 120pc in size. There is also a continuum-emitting dust component. If associated with th putative AGN in IC694, we estimate that it would be approximately 5 times less luminous than the AGN in NGC3690. The presence of dual AGN activity makes Arp299 a good example to study such phenomenon in the early coalescence phase of interacting galaxies.
  • Recent theoretical and observational works indicate the presence of a correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) and the active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity (and, therefore, the black hole accretion rate) of Seyfert galaxies. This suggests a physical connection between the gas forming stars on kpc scales and the gas on sub-pc scales that is feeding the black hole. We compiled the largest sample of Seyfert galaxies to date with high angular resolution (0.4-0.8 arcsec) mid-infrared (8-13 micron) spectroscopy. The sample includes 29 Seyfert galaxies drawn from the AGN Revised Shapley-Ames catalogue. At a median distance of 33 Mpc, our data allow us to probe nuclear regions on scales of 65 pc (median value). We found no general evidence of suppression of the 11.3 micron polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in the vicinity of these AGN, and used this feature as a proxy for the SFR. We detected the 11.3 micron PAH feature in the nuclear spectra of 45% of our sample. The derived nuclear SFRs are, on average, five times lower than those measured in circumnuclear regions of 600 pc in size (median value). However, the projected nuclear SFR densities are a factor of 20 higher than those measured on circumnuclear scales. This indicates that the SF activity per unit area in the central 65 pc of Seyfert galaxies is much higher than at larger distances from their nuclei. We studied the connection between the nuclear SFR and the black hole accretion rate and showed that numerical simulations reproduce fairly well our observed relation.
  • We use recent high-resolution infrared (IR; 1 - 20 micron) photometry to examine the origin of the IR emission in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN). The data are compared with published model fits that describe the spectral energy distribution of LLAGN in terms of an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF), truncated thin accretion disk, and jet. The truncated disk in these models is usually not luminous enough to explain the observed IR emission, and in all cases its spectral shape is much narrower than the broad IR peaks in the data. Synchrotron radiation from the jet appears to be important in very radio-loud nuclei, but the detection of strong silicate emission features in many objects indicates that dust must also contribute. We investigate this point by fitting the IR SED of NGC 3998 using dusty torus and optically thin (tau_MIR ~ 1) dust shell models. While more detailed modeling is necessary, these initial results suggest that dust may account for the nuclear mid-IR emission of many LLAGN.
  • An optically and geometrically thick torus obscures the central engine of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) from some lines of sight. From a magnetohydrodynamical framework, the torus can be considered to be a particular region of clouds surrounding the central engine where the clouds are dusty and optically thick. In this framework, the magnetic field plays an important role in the creation, morphology and evolution of the torus. If the dust grains within the clouds are assumed to be aligned by paramagnetic alignment, then the ratio of the intrinsic polarisation and visual extinction, P(%)/Av, is a function of the magnetic field strength. To estimate the visual extinction through the torus and constrain the polarisation mechanisms in the nucleus of AGN, we developed a polarisation model to fit both the total and polarised flux in a 1.2" (~263pc) aperture of the type 2 AGN, IC5063. The polarisation model is consistent with the nuclear polarisation observed at K being produced by dichroic absorption from aligned dust grains with a visual extinction through the torus of 48$\pm$2 mag. We estimated the intrinsic polarisation arising from dichroic absorption to be P$_{K}^{dic}$=12.5$\pm$2.7%. We consider the physical conditions and environment of the gas and dust for the torus of IC5063. Then, through paramagnetic alignment, we estimate a magnetic field strength in the range of 12-128mG in the NIR emitting regions of the torus of IC5063. Alternatively, we estimate the magnetic field strength in the plane of the sky using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The minimum magnetic field strength in the plane of the sky is estimated to be 13 and 41 mG depending of the conditions within the torus of IC5063. These techniques afford the chance to make a survey of AGN, to investigate the effects of magnetic field strength on the torus, accretion, and interaction to the host galaxy.
  • We present high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and archival Spitzer spectra for 22 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN; Lbol \lesssim 10^42 erg/sec). Infrared (IR) observations may advance our understanding of the accretion flows in LLAGN, the fate of the obscuring torus at low accretion rates, and, perhaps, the star formation histories of these objects. However, while comprehensively studied in higher-luminosity Seyferts and quasars, the nuclear IR properties of LLAGN have not yet been well-determined. We separate the present LLAGN sample into three categories depending on their Eddington ratio and radio emission, finding different IR characteristics for each class. (I) At the low-luminosity, low-Eddington ratio (log Lbol/LEdd < -4.6) end of the sample, we identify "host-dominated" galaxies with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands that may indicate active (circum-)nuclear star formation. (II) Some very radio-loud objects are also present at these low Eddington ratios. The IR emission in these nuclei is dominated by synchrotron radiation, and some are likely to be unobscured type 2 AGN that genuinely lack a broad line region. (III) At higher Eddington ratios, strong, compact nuclear sources are visible in the MIR images. The nuclear SEDs of these galaxies are diverse; some resemble typical Seyfert nuclei, while others lack a well-defined MIR "dust bump". Strong silicate emission is present in many of these objects. We speculate that this, together with high ratios of silicate strength to hydrogen column density, could suggest optically thin dust and low dust-to-gas ratios, in accordance with model predictions that LLAGN do not host a Seyfert-like obscuring torus.
  • Dust reprocesses the intrinsic radiation of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to emerge at longer wavelengths. The observed mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity depends fundamentally on the luminosity of the central engine, but in detail it also depends on the geometric distribution of the surrounding dust. To quantify this relationship, we observe nearby normal AGNs in the MIR to achieve spatial resolution better than 100 pc, and we use absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity as a proxy for the intrinsic AGN emission. We find no significant difference between optically classified Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies. Spectroscopic differences, both at optical and IR wavelengths, indicate that the immediate surroundings of AGNs is not spherically symmetric, as in standard unified AGN models. A quantitative analysis of clumpy torus radiative transfer models shows that a clumpy local environment can account for this dependence on viewing geometry while producing MIR continuum emission that remains nearly isotropic, as we observe, although the material is not optically thin at these wavelengths. We find some luminosity dependence on the X-ray/MIR correlation in the smallest scale measurements, which may indicate enhanced dust emission associated with star formation, even on these sub-100 pc scales.
  • The unified model of active galactic nuclei (AGN) predicts silicate emission features at 10 and 18 microns in type 1 AGN, and such features have now been observed in objects ranging from distant QSOs to nearby LINERs. More surprising, however, is the detection of silicate emission in a few type 2 AGN. By combining Gemini and Spitzer mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of NGC 2110, the closest known Seyfert 2 galaxy with silicate emission features, we can constrain the location of the silicate emitting region to within 32 pc of the nucleus. This is the strongest constraint yet on the size of the silicate emitting region in a Seyfert galaxy of any type. While this result is consistent with a narrow line region origin for the emission, comparison with clumpy torus models demonstrates that emission from an edge-on torus can also explain the silicate emission features and 2-20 micron spectral energy distribution of this object. In many of the best-fitting models the torus has only a small number of clouds along the line of sight, and does not extend far above the equatorial plane. Extended silicate-emitting regions may well be present in AGN, but this work establishes that emission from the torus itself is also a viable option for the origin of silicate emission features in active galaxies of both type 1 and type 2.
  • We report spatially-resolved variations in the 3.4micron hydrocarbon absorption feature and the 3.3micron polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission band in the Circinus galaxy over the central few arcsec. The absorption is measured towards warm emitting dust associated with Coronal line regions to the east and west of the nucleus. There is an absorption optical depth tau(3.4um) ~0.1 in the core which decreases to the west and increases to the east. This is consistent with increased extinction out to ~40 pc east of the core, supported by the Coronal emission line intensities which are significantly lower to the east than the west. PAH emission is measured to be symmetrically distributed out to +/- 4 arcsec, outside the differential extinction region. The asymmetry in the 3.4micron absorption band reflects that seen in the 9.7micron silicate absorption band reported by Roche et al. (2006) and the ratio of the two absorption depths remains approximately constant across the central regions, with tau(3.4um) / tau(9.7um) ~ 0.06 +/-0.01. This indicates well-mixed hydrocarbon and silicate dust populations, with no evidence for significant changes near the nucleus.
  • The nucleus of the nearby galaxy, NGC 1097, is known to host a young, compact (r < 9 parsec) nuclear star cluster as well as a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been suggested both that the nuclear stellar cluster is associated with a dusty torus, and that low-luminosity AGN like NGC 1097 do not have the torus predicted by the unified model of AGN. To investigate these contradictory possibilities we have acquired Gemini/T-ReCS 11.7 micron and 18.3 micron images of the central few hundred parsecs of this galaxy at < 45 parsec angular resolution, in which the nucleus and spectacular, kiloparsec-scale star-forming ring are detected in both bands. The small-scale mid-infrared (mid-IR) luminosity implies thermal emission from warm dust close to the central engine of this galaxy. Fitting of torus models shows that the observed mid-IR emission cannot be accounted for by dust heated by the central engine. Rather, the principal source heating the dust in this object is the nuclear star cluster itself, suggesting that the dust that we detect is not the torus of AGN unified schemes (although it is also possible that the dusty starburst itself could provide the obscuration invoked by the unified model). Comparison of Spitzer/IRS and Gemini/GNIRS spectra shows that, although polyaromatic hydrocarbon emission (PAH) bands are strong in the immediate circumnuclear region of the galaxy, PAH emission is weak or absent in the central 19 parsecs. The lack of PAH emission can probably be explained largely by destruction/ionization of PAH molecules by hard photons from the nuclear star cluster. If NGC 1097 is typical, PAH emission bands may not be a useful tool with which to find very compact nuclear starbursts even in low-luminosity AGN.
  • In order to test the silicate-core/organic-mantle model of galactic interstellar dust, we have performed spectropolarimetry of the 3.4 micron C-H bond stretch that is characteristic of aliphatic hydrocarbons, using the nucleus of the Seyfert 2 galaxy, NGC 1068, as a bright, dusty background source. Polarization calculations show that, if the grains in NGC 1068 had the properties assigned by the core-mantle model to dust in the galactic diffuse ISM, they would cause a detectable rise in polarization over the 3.4 micron feature. No such increase is observed. We discuss modifications to the basic core-mantle model, such as changes in grain size or the existence of additional non-hydrocarbon aligned grain populations, which could better fit the observational evidence. However, we emphasize that the absence of polarization over the 3.4 micron band in NGC 1068 - and, indeed, in every line of sight examined to date - can be readily explained by a population of small, unaligned carbonaceous grains with no physical connection to the silicates.
  • We present spatially-resolved, near-diffraction-limited 10 micron spectra of the nucleus of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, obtained with Michelle, the mid-IR imager and spectrometer on the 8.1 m Gemini North telescope. The spectra cover the nucleus and the central 6.0" x 0.4" of the ionization cones at a spatial resolution of approximately 0.4" (approx. 30 parsecs). The spectra extracted in 0.4" steps along the slit reveal striking variations in continuum slope, silicate feature profile and depth, and fine structure line fluxes on subarcsecond scales, illustrating in unprecedented detail the complexity of the circumnuclear regions of this galaxy at mid-IR wavelengths. A comparison of photometry in various apertures reveals two distinct components: a compact (radius <15 pc), bright source within the central 0.4" x 0.4" and extended, lower brightness emission. We identify the compact source with the AGN obscuring torus, and the diffuse component with the AGN-heated dust in the ionization cones. While the torus emission dominates the flux observed in the near-IR, the mid-IR flux measured with apertures larger than about 1" is dominated instead by the dust emission from the ionization cones. Many previous attempts to determine the torus spectral energy distribution are thus likely to be significantly affected by contamination from the extended emission. The observed spectrum of the compact source is compared with clumpy torus models, which require most of the mid-IR emitting clouds to be located within a few parsecs of the central engine. We also present a UKIRT/CGS4 5 micron spectrum covering the R(0) -- R(4) lines of the fundamental vibration-rotation band of 12CO. None of these lines was detected, and we discuss these non-detections in terms of the filling factor and composition of the nuclear clouds. (Abridged)
  • We present new spectroscopic observations of the 3.4 micron absorption feature in the Seyfert galaxies, NGC1068 and NGC7674, and the ultraluminous infrared galaxy, IRAS08572+3915. A signature of C-H bonds in aliphatic hydrocarbons, the 3.4 micron feature indicates the presence of organic material in Galactic and extragalactic dust. Here we compare the 3.4 micron feature in all the galaxies in which it has been detected. In several cases, the signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution permit a detailed examination of the feature profile, something which has rarely been attempted in extragalactic lines of sight. The 3.4 micron band in these galaxies closely resembles that seen in the Galactic diffuse ISM and in newly-formed dust in a protoplanetary nebula. The similarity implies a common carrier for the carbonaceous component of dust, and one which is resistant to processing in the interstellar and/or circumnuclear medium. We also examine the mid-IR spectrum of NGC1068, because absorption bands in the 5-8 micron region further constrain the chemistry of the 3.4 micron band carrier. While weak features like those present in the mid-IR spectrum of diffuse dust towards the Galactic center would be undetectable in NGC1068, the strong bands found in the spectra of many proposed dust analog materials are clearly absent, eliminating certain candidates and production mechanisms for the carrier. The absence of strong absorption features at 5-8 microns is also consistent with the interpretation that the similarity in the 3.4 micron feature in NGC1068 to that in Galactic lines of sight reflects real chemical similarity in the carbonaceous dust.