• Here we present deep (16 mumJy), very high (40 mas) angular resolution 1.14 mm, polarimetric, Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations towards the massive protostar driving the HH 80-81 radio jet. The observations clearly resolve the disk oriented perpendicular to the radio jet, with a radius of ~0.171 arcsec (~291 au at 1.7 kpc distance). The continuum brightness temperature, the intensity profile, and the polarization properties clearly indicate that the disk is optically thick for a radius of R<170 au. The linear polarization of the dust emission is detected almost all along the disk and its properties suggest that dust polarization is produced mainly by self-scattering. However, the polarization pattern presents a clear differentiation between the inner (optically thick) part of the disk and the outer (optically thin) region of the disk, with a sharp transition that occurs at a radius of 0.1 arcsec (~170 au). The polarization characteristics of the inner disk suggest that dust settling has not occurred yet with a maximum dust grain size between 50 and 500 mum. The outer part of the disk has a clear azimuthal pattern but with a significantly higher polarization fraction compared to the inner disk. This pattern is broadly consistent with self-scattering of a radiation field that is beamed radially outward, as expected in the optically thin outer region, although contribution from non-spherical grains aligned with respect to the radiative flux cannot be excluded.
  • We present subarcsecond angular resolution observations carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 880 $\mu$m centered at the B0-type protostar GGD27~MM1, the driving source of the parsec scale HH 80-81 jet. We constrain its polarized continuum emission to be $\lesssim0.8\%$ at this wavelength. Its submm spectrum is dominated by sulfur-bearing species tracing a rotating disk--like structure (SO and SO$_2$ isotopologues mainly), but also shows HCN-bearing and CH$_3$OH lines, which trace the disk and the outflow cavity walls excavated by the HH 80-81 jet. The presence of many sulfurated lines could indicate the presence of shocked gas at the disk's centrifugal barrier or that MM1 is a hot core at an evolved stage. The resolved SO$_2$ emission traces very well the disk kinematics and we fit the SMA observations using a thin-disk Keplerian model, which gives the inclination (47$^{\circ}$), the inner ($\lesssim170$ AU) and outer ($\sim950-1300$~AU) radii and the disk's rotation velocity (3.4 km s$^{-1}$ at a putative radius of 1700 AU). We roughly estimate a protostellar dynamical mass of 4-18\msun. MM2 and WMC cores show, comparatively, an almost empty spectra suggesting that they are associated with extended emission detected in previous low-angular resolution observations, and therefore indicating youth (MM2) or the presence of a less massive object (WMC).
  • We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.35 mm subarcsecond angular resolution observations toward the LkH{\alpha} 234 intermediate-mass star-forming region. The dust emission arises from a filamentary structure of $\sim$5 arcsec ($\sim$4500 au) enclosing VLA 1-3 and MM 1, perpendicular to the different outflows detected in the region. The most evolved objects are located at the southeastern edge of the dust filamentary structure and the youngest ones at the northeastern edge. The circumstellar structures around VLA 1, VLA 3, and MM 1 have radii between $\sim$200 and $\sim$375 au and masses in the $\sim$0.08-0.3 M$_{\odot}$ range. The 1.35 mm emission of VLA 2 arises from an unresolved (r$< 135$ au) circumstellar disk with a mass of $\sim$0.02 M$_{\odot}$. This source is powering a compact ($\sim$4000 au), low radial velocity ($\sim$7 km s$^{-1}$) SiO bipolar outflow, close to the plane of the sky. We conclude that this outflow is the "large-scale" counterpart of the short-lived, episodic, bipolar outflow observed through H$_2$O masers at much smaller scales ($\sim $180 au), and that has been created by the accumulation of the ejection of several episodic collimated events of material. The circumstellar gas around VLA 2 and VLA 3 is hot ($\sim$130 K) and exhibits velocity gradients that could trace rotation. There is a bridge of warm and dense molecular gas connecting VLA 2 and VLA 3. We discuss the possibility that this bridge could trace a stream of gas between VLA 3 and VLA 2, increasing the accretion rate onto VLA 2 to explain why this source has an important outflow activity.
  • We present observations of the 1.3 mm continuum emission toward hub-N and hub-S of the infrared dark cloud G14.225-0.506 carried out with the Submillimeter Array, together with observations of the dust emission at 870 and 350 microns obtained with APEX and CSO telescopes. The large scale dust emission of both hubs consists of a single peaked clump elongated in the direction of the associated filament. At small scales, the SMA images reveal that both hubs fragment into several dust condensations. The fragmentation level was assessed under the same conditions and we found that hub-N presents 4 fragments while hub-S is more fragmented, with 13 fragments identified. We studied the density structure by means of a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profile at 870 and 350 microns and the spectral energy distribution adopting a Plummer-like function to describe the density structure. The parameters inferred from the model are remarkably similar in both hubs, suggesting that density structure could not be responsible in determining the fragmentation level. We estimated several physical parameters such as the level of turbulence and the magnetic field strength, and we found no significant differences between these hubs. The Jeans analysis indicates that the observed fragmentation is more consistent with thermal Jeans fragmentation compared with a scenario that turbulent support is included. The lower fragmentation level observed in hub-N could be explained in terms of stronger UV radiation effects from a nearby HII region, evolutionary effects, and/or stronger magnetic fields at small scales, a scenario that should be further investigated.
  • J. A. Acosta-Pulido, I. Agudo, A. Alberdi, J. Alcolea, E. J. Alfaro, A. Alonso-Herrero, G. Anglada, P. Arnalte-Mur, Y. Ascasibar, B. Ascaso, R. Azulay, R. Bachiller, A. Baez-Rubio, E. Battaner, J. Blasco, C. B. Brook, V. Bujarrabal, G. Busquet, M. D. Caballero-Garcia, C. Carrasco-Gonzalez, J. Casares, A. J. Castro-Tirado, L. Colina, F. Colomer, I. de Gregorio-Monsalvo, A. del Olmo, J.-F. Desmurs, J. M. Diego, R. Dominguez-Tenreiro, R. Estalella, A. Fernandez-Soto, E. Florido, J. Font, J. A. Font, A. Fuente, R. Garcia-Benito, S. Garcia-Burillo, B. Garcia-Lorenzo, A. Gil de Paz, J. M. Girart, J. R. Goicoechea, J. F. Gomez, M. Gonzalez-Garcia, O. Gonzalez-Martin, J. I. Gonzalez-Serrano, J. Gorgas, J. Gorosabel, A. Guijarro, J. C. Guirado, L. Hernandez-Garcia, C. Hernandez-Monteagudo, D. Herranz, R. Herrero-Illana, Y.-D. Hu, N. Huelamo, M. Huertas-Company, J. Iglesias-Paramo, S. Jeong, I. Jimenez-Serra, J. H. Knapen, R. A. Lineros, U. Lisenfeld, J. M. Marcaide, I. Marquez, J. Marti, J. M. Marti, I. Marti-Vidal, E. Martinez-Gonzalez, J. Martin-Pintado, J. Masegosa, J. M. Mayen-Gijon, M. Mezcua, S. Migliari, P. Mimica, J. Moldon, O. Morata, I. Negueruela, S. R. Oates, M. Osorio, A. Palau, J. M. Paredes, J. Perea, P. G. Perez-Gonzalez, E. Perez-Montero, M. A. Perez-Torres, M. Perucho, S. Planelles, J. A. Pons, A. Prieto, V. Quilis, P. Ramirez-Moreta, C. Ramos Almeida, N. Rea, M. Ribo, M. J. Rioja, J. M. Rodriguez Espinosa, E. Ros, J. A. Rubiño-Martin, B. Ruiz-Granados, J. Sabater, S. Sanchez, C. Sanchez-Contreras, A. Sanchez-Monge, R. Sanchez-Ramirez, A. M. Sintes, J. M. Solanes, C. F. Sopuerta, M. Tafalla, J. C. Tello, B. Tercero, M. C. Toribio, J. M. Torrelles, M. A. P. Torres, A. Usero, L. Verdes-Montenegro, A. Vidal-Garcia, P. Vielva, J. Vilchez, B.-B. Zhang
    June 17, 2015 astro-ph.IM
    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is called to revolutionise essentially all areas of Astrophysics. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be a transformational instrument, and its scientific potential will go beyond the interests of astronomers. Its technological challenges and huge cost requires a multinational effort, and Europe has recognised this by putting the SKA on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The Spanish SKA White Book is the result of the coordinated effort of 120 astronomers from 40 different research centers. The book shows the enormous scientific interest of the Spanish astronomical community in the SKA and warrants an optimum scientific exploitation of the SKA by Spanish researchers, if Spain enters the SKA project.
  • In this work we derive the full 3-D kinematics of the near-infrared outflow HH 223, located in the dark cloud Lynds 723 (L723), where a well-defined quadrupolar CO outflow is found. HH 223 appears projected onto the two lobes of the east-west CO outflow. The radio continuum source VLA 2, towards the centre of the CO outflow, harbours a multiple system of low-mass young stellar objects. One of the components has been proposed to be the exciting source of the east-west CO outflow. From the analisys of the kinematics, we get further evidence on the relationship between the near-infrared and CO outflows and on the location of their exciting source. The proper motions were derived using multi-epoch, narrow-band H$_2$ (2.122 $\mu$m line) images. Radial velocities were derived from the 2.122 $\mu$m line of the spectra. Because of the extended (~5 arcmin), S-shaped morphology of the target, the spectra were obtained with the Multi-Object-Spectroscopy (MOS) observing mode using the instrument LIRIS at the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. To our knowledge, this work is the first time that MOS observing mode has been successfully used in the near infrared range for an extended target.
  • We report multi-epoch VLBI H$_2$O maser observations towards the compact cluster of YSOs close to the Herbig Be star LkH$\alpha$ 234. This cluster includes LkH$\alpha$ 234 and at least nine more YSOs that are formed within projected distances of $\sim$10 arcsec ($\sim$9,000 au). We detect H$_2$O maser emission towards four of these YSOs. In particular, our VLBI observations (including proper motion measurements) reveal a remarkable very compact ($\sim$0.2 arcsec = $\sim$180 au), bipolar H$_2$O maser outflow emerging from the embedded YSO VLA 2. We estimate a kinematic age of $\sim$40 yr for this bipolar outflow, with expanding velocities of $\sim$20 km s$^{-1}$ and momentum rate $\dot M_w V_w$ $\simeq$ $10^{-4}-10^{-3}$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ km s$^{-1}$$\times (\Omega$/$4\pi)$, powered by a YSO of a few solar masses. We propose that the outflow is produced by recurrent episodic jet ejections associated with the formation of this YSO. Short-lived episodic ejection events have previously been found towards high-mass YSOs. We show now that this behaviour is also present in intermediate-mass YSOs. These short-lived episodic ejections are probably related to episodic increases in the accretion rate, as observed in low-mass YSOs. We predict the presence of an accretion disk associated with VLA 2. If detected, this would represent one of the few known examples of intermediate-mass stars with a disk-YSO-jet system at scales of a few hundred au.
  • In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 micron (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the Spectral Energy Distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.
  • We present multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) H$_2$O maser observations toward the massive young stellar objects (YSOs) VLA 2 and VLA 3 in the star-forming region AFGL 2591. Through these observations, we have extended the study of the evolution of the masers towards these objects up to a time span of $\sim$ 10 yrs, measuring their radial velocities and proper motions. The H$_2$O masers in VLA 3, the most massive YSO in AFGL 2591 ($\sim$ 30--40~M$_{\odot}$), are grouped within projected distances of $\lesssim$ 40 mas ($\lesssim$ 130 AU) from VLA 3. In contrast to other H$_2$O masers in AFGL 2591, the masers associated with VLA 3 are significantly blueshifted (up to $\sim$ 30 km s$^{-1}$) with respect to the velocity of the ambient molecular cloud. We find that the H$_2$O maser cluster as a whole, has moved westwards of VLA~3 between the 2001 and 2009 observations, with a proper motion of $\sim$ 1.2 mas yr$^{-1}$ ($\sim$ 20 km s$^{-1}$). We conclude that these masers are tracing blueshifted outflowing material, shock excited at the inner parts of a cavity seen previously in ammonia molecular lines and infrared images, and proposed to be evacuated by the outflow associated with the massive VLA 3 source. The masers in the region of VLA 2 are located at projected distances of $\sim$ 0.7$''$ ($\sim$ 2300 AU) north from this source, with their kinematics suggesting that they are excited by a YSO other than VLA 2. This driving source has not yet been identified.
  • In this paper we analyze multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) water maser observations carried out with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) toward the high-mass star-forming region AFGL 2591. We detected maser emission associated with the radio continuum sources VLA 2 and VLA 3. In addition, a water maser cluster, VLA 3-N, was detected ~ 0.5" north of VLA 3. We concentrate the discussion of this paper on the spatio-kinematical distribution of the water masers towards VLA 3-N. The water maser emission toward the region VLA 3-N shows two bow shock-like structures, Northern and Southern, separated from each other by ~ 100 mas (~ 330 AU). The spatial distribution and kinematics of the water masers in this cluster have persisted over a time span of seven years. The Northern bow shock has a somewhat irregular morphology, while the Southern one has a remarkably smooth morphology. We measured the proper motions of 33 water maser features, which have an average proper motion velocity of ~ 1.3 mas/yr (~ 20 km/s). The morphology and the proper motions of this cluster of water masers show systematic expanding motions that could imply one or two different centers of star formation activity. We made a detailed model for the Southern structure, proposing two different kinematic models to explain the 3-dimensional spatio-kinematical distribution of the water masers: (1) a static central source driving the two bow-shock structures; (2) two independent driving sources, one of them exciting the Northern bow-shock structure, and the other one, a young runaway star moving in the local molecular medium exciting and molding the remarkably smoother Southern bow-shock structure. Future observations will be necessary to discriminate between the two scenarios, in particular by identifying the still unseen driving source(s).
  • HH 223 is the optical counterpart of a larger scale H2 outflow, driven by the protostellar source VLA 2A, in L723. Its poorly collimated and rather chaotic morphology suggested the Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) as an appropriate option to map the emission for deriving the physical conditions and the kinematics. Here we present new results based on the IFS observations made with the INTEGRAL system at the WHT. The brightest knots of HH 223 (\sim16 arcsec, 0.02 pc at a distance of 300 pc) were mapped with a single pointing in the spectral range 6200-7700 A. We obtained the emission-line intensity maps for Halpha, [NII] 6584 A and [SII] 6716, 6731 A, and explored the distribution of the excitation and electron density from [NII]/Halpha, [SII]/Halpha, and [SII] 6716/6731 line-ratio maps. Maps of the radial velocity field were obtained. We analysed the 3D-kinematics by combining the knot radial velocities, derived from IFS data, with the knot proper motions derived from multi-epoch, narrow-band images. The intensity maps built from IFS data reproduced well the morphology found in the narrow-band images. We checked the results obtained from previous long-slit observations with those derived from IFS spectra extracted with a similar spatial sampling. At the positions intersected by the slit, the physical conditions and kinematics derived from IFS are compatible with those derived from long-slit data. In contrast, significant discrepancies were found when the results from long-slit data were compared with the ones derived from IFS spectra extracted at positions shifted a few arcsec from those intersected by the slit. This clearly revealed IFS observations as the best choice to get a reliable picture of the HH emission properties.
  • VLBI multi-epoch water maser observations are a powerful tool to study the dense, warm shocked gas very close to massive protostars. The very high-angular resolution of these observations allow us to measure the proper motions of the masers in a few weeks, and together with the radial velocity, to determine their full kinematics. In this paper we present a summary of the main observational results obtained toward the massive star-forming regions of Cepheus A and W75N, among them: (i) the identification of different centers of high-mass star formation activity at scales of 100 AU; (ii) the discovery of new phenomena associated with the early stages of high-mass protostellar evolution (e.g., isotropic gas ejections); and (iii) the identification of the simultaneous presence of a wide-angle outflow and a highly collimated jet in the massive object Cep A HW2, similar to what is observed in some low-mass protostars. Some of the implications of these results in the study of high-mass star formation are discussed.
  • The intermediate- to high-mass star-forming region IRAS 20343+4129 is an excellent laboratory to study the influence of high- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects on nearby starless dense cores, and investigate for possible implications in the clustered star formation process. We present 3 mm observations of continuum and rotational transitions of several molecular species (C2H, c-C3H2, N2H+, NH2D) obtained with the Combined Array for Research in Millimetre-wave Astronomy, as well as 1.3 cm continuum and NH3 observations carried out with the Very Large Array, to reveal the properties of the dense gas. We confirm undoubtedly previous claims of an expanding cavity created by an ultracompact HII region associated with a young B2 zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) star. The dense gas surrounding the cavity is distributed in a filament that seems squeezed in between the cavity and a collimated outflow associated with an intermediate-mass protostar. We have identified 5 millimeter continuum condensations in the filament. All of them show column densities consistent with potentially being the birthplace of intermediate- to high-mass objects. These cores appear different from those observed in low-mass clustered environments in sereval observational aspects (kinematics, temperature, chemical gradients), indicating a strong influence of the most massive and evolved members of the protocluster. We suggest a possible scenario in which the B2 ZAMS star driving the cavity has compressed the surrounding gas, perturbed its properties and induced the star formation in its immediate surroundings.
  • We present the results of the observations of the (J,K)=(1,1) and the (J,K)=(2,2) inversion transitions of the NH3 molecule toward a large sample of 40 regions with molecular or optical outflows, using the 37 m radio telescope of the Haystack Observatory. We detected NH3 emission in 27 of the observed regions, which we mapped in 25 of them. Additionally, we searched for the 6{16}-5{23} H2O maser line toward six regions, detecting H2O maser emission in two of them, HH265 and AFGL 5173. We estimate the physical parameters of the regions mapped in NH3 and analyze for each particular region the distribution of high density gas and its relationship with the presence of young stellar objects. From the global analysis of our data we find that in general the highest values of the line width are obtained for the regions with the highest values of mass and kinetic temperature. We also found a correlation between the nonthermal line width and the bolometric luminosity of the sources, and between the mass of the core and the bolometric luminosity. We confirm with a larger sample of regions the conclusion of Anglada et al. (1997) that the NH3 line emission is more intense toward molecular outflow sources than toward sources with optical outflow, suggesting a possible evolutionary scheme in which young stellar objects associated with molecular outflows progressively lose their neighboring high-density gas, weakening both the NH3 emission and the molecular outflow in the process, and making optical jets more easily detectable as the total amount of gas decreases.
  • The dark cloud Lynds 723 (L723) is a low-mass star-forming region where one of the few known cases of a quadrupolar CO outflow has been reported. Two recent works have found that the radio continuum source VLA 2, towards the centre of the CO outflow, is actually a multiple system of young stellar objects (YSOs). Several line-emission nebulae that lie projected on the east-west CO outflow were detected in narrow-band Halpha and [SII] images. The spectra of the knots are characteristic of shock-excited gas (Herbig-Haro spectra), with supersonic blueshifted velocities, which suggests an optical outflow also powered by the VLA 2 YSO system of L723. We imaged a field of ~5' X 5' centred on HH 223, which includes the whole region of the quadrupolar CO outflow with nir narrow-band filters . The H2 line-emission structures appear distributed over a region of 5.5' (0.5 pc for a distance of 300 pc) at both sides of the VLA 2 YSO system, with an S-shape morphology, and are projected onto the east-west CO outflow. Most of them were resolved in smaller knotty substructures. The [FeII] emission only appears associated with HH 223. An additional nebular emission from the continuum in Hc and Kc appears associated with HH 223-K1, the structure closest to the VLA 2 YSO system, and could be tracing the cavity walls. We propose that the H2 structures form part of a large-scale near-infrared outflow, which is also associated with the VLA 2 YSO system. The current data do not allow us to discern which of the YSOs of VLA 2 is powering this large scale optical/near-infrared outflow.
  • We present five epochs of VLBI water maser observations around the massive protostar Cepheus A HW2 with 0.4 mas (0.3 AU) resolution. The main goal of these observations was to follow the evolution of the remarkable water maser linear/arcuate structures found in earlier VLBI observations. Comparing the data of our new epochs of observation with those observed five years before, we find that at "large" scales of > 1" (700 AU) the main regions of maser emission persist, implying that both the surrounding medium and the exciting sources of the masers have been relatively stable during that time span. However, at smaller scales of < 0.1" (70 AU) we see large changes in the maser structures, particularly in the expanding arcuate structures R4 and R5. R4 traces a nearly elliptical patchy ring of ~ 70 mas size (50 AU) with expanding motions of ~ 5 mas/yr (15 km/s). This structure is probably driven by the wind of a still unidentified YSO located at the centre of the ring (~ 0.18" south of HW2). On the other hand, the R5 expanding bubble structure (driven by the wind of a previously identified YSO located ~ 0.6" south of HW2) is currently dissipating in the circumstellar medium and losing its previous degree of symmetry, indicating a very short-lived event. In addition, our results reveal, at scales of ~ 1" (700 AU), the simultaneous presence of a relatively slow (~ 10-70 km/s) wide-angle outflow (opening angle of ~ 102 deg, traced by the masers, and the fast (~ 500~km/s) highly collimated radio jet associated with HW2 (opening angle of ~ 18 deg, previously observed with the VLA. This simultaneous presence of a wide-angle outflow and a highly collimated jet associated with a massive protostar is similar to what is found in some low-mass YSOs. The implications of these results in the study of the formation of high-mass stars are discussed.
  • HH 110 is a rather peculiar Herbig-Haro object in Orion that originates due to the deflection of another jet (HH 270) by a dense molecular clump, instead of being directly ejected from a young stellar object. Here we present new results on the kinematics and physical conditions of HH 110 based on Integral Field Spectroscopy. The 3D spectral data cover the whole outflow extent (~4.5 arcmin, ~0.6 pc at a distance of 460 pc) in the spectral range 6500-7000 \AA. We built emission-line intensity maps of H$\alpha$, [NII] and [SII] and of their radial velocity channels. Furthermore, we analysed the spatial distribution of the excitation and electron density from [NII]/H$\alpha$, [SII]/H$\alpha$, and [SII] 6716/6731 integrated line-ratio maps, as well as their behaviour as a function of velocity, from line-ratio channel maps. Our results fully reproduce the morphology and kinematics obtained from previous imaging and long-slit data. In addition, the IFS data revealed, for the first time, the complex spatial distribution of the physical conditions (excitation and density) in the whole jet, and their behaviour as a function of the kinematics. The results here derived give further support to the more recent model simulations that involve deflection of a pulsed jet propagating in an inhomogeneous ambient medium. The IFS data give richer information than that provided by current model simulations or laboratory jet experiments. Hence, they could provide valuable clues to constrain the space parameters in future theoretical works.
  • We observed with the VLA, PdBI, and SMA the centimeter and millimeter continuum, N2H+(1-0), and CO(2-1) emission associated with a dusty cloud harboring a nascent cluster with intermediate-mass protostars. At centimeter wavelengths we found a strong source, tracing a UCHII region, at the eastern edge of the dusty cloud, with a shell-like structure, and with the near-infrared counterpart falling in the center of the shell. This is presumably the most massive source of the forming cluster. About 15'' to the west of the UCHII region and well embedded in the dusty cloud, we detected a strong millimeter source, MM1, associated with centimeter and near-infrared emission. MM1 seems to be driving a prominent high-velocity CO bipolar outflow, and is embedded in a ridge of dense gas traced by N2H+. We estimated that MM1 is an intermediate-mass source in the Class 0/I phase. About 15'' to the south of MM1, and still more deeply embedded in the dusty cloud, we detected a compact millimeter source, MM2, with neither centimeter nor near-infrared emission, but with water maser emission. MM2 is associated with a clump of N2H+, whose kinematics reveal a clear velocity gradient and additionally we found signposts of infall motions. MM2, being deeply embedded within the dusty cloud, with an associated water maser but no hints of CO outflow emission, is an intriguing object, presumably of intermediate mass. In conclusion, the UCHII region is found at the border of a dusty cloud which is currently undergoing active star formation. Two intermediate-mass protostars in the dusty cloud seem to have formed after the UCHII region and have different properties related to the outflow phenomenon.
  • Some well-studied Herbig Haro objects have associated with them one or more cold, dense, and quiescent clumps of gas. We propose that such clumps near an HH object can be used as a general measure of clumpiness in the molecular cloud that contains that HH object. Our aim is to make a survey of clumps around a sample of HH objects, and to use the results to make an estimate of the clumpiness in molecular clouds. All known cold, dense, and quiescent clumps near HH objects are anomalously strong HCO+ emitters. Our method is, therefore, to search for strong HCO+ emission as an indicator of a clump near to an HH object. The searches were made using JCMT and SEST in the HCO+ 3-2 and also H13CO+ 1-0 lines, with some additional searches for methanol and sulphur monoxide lines. The sources selected were a sample of 22 HH objects in which no previous HCO+ emission had been detected. We find that half of the HH objects have clumps detected in the HCO+ 3-2 line and that all searches in H13CO$+ 1-0 lines show evidence of clumpiness. All condensations have narrow linewidths and are evidently unaffected dynamically by the HH jet shock. We conclude that the molecular clouds in which these HH objects are found must be highly heterogeneous on scales of less than 0.1 pc. An approximate calculation based on these results suggests that the area filling factor of clumps affected by HH objects is on the order of 10%. These clumps have gas number densities larger than 3e4 cm-2.
  • HH 223 is a knotty, wiggling nebular emission of ~30" length found in the L723 star-forming region. It lies projected onto the largest blueshifted lobe of the cuadrupolar CO outflow powered by a low-mass YSO system embedded in the core of L723. We analysed the physical conditions and kinematics along HH 223 with the aim of disentangling whether the emission arises from shock-excited, supersonic gas characteristic of a stellar jet, or is only tracing the wall cavity excavated by the CO outflow. We performed long-slit optical spectroscopy along HH 223, crossing all the bright knots (A to E) and part of the low-brightness emission nebula (F filament). One spectrum of each knot, suitable to characterize the nature of its emission, was obtained. The physical conditions and the radial velocity of the HH 223 emission along the slits were also sampled at smaller scale (0.6") than the knot sizes. {The spectra of all the HH 223 knots appear as those of the intermediate/high excitation Herbig-Haro objects. The emission is supersonic, with blueshifted peak velocities ranging from -60 to -130 km/s. Reliable variations in the kinematics and physical conditions at smaller scale that the knot sizes are also found. The properties of the HH 223 emission derived from the spectroscopy confirm the HH nature of the object, the supersonic optical outflow most probably also being powered by the YSOs embedded in the L723 core.
  • We present 1.35 mm SMA observations around the low-mass Class 0 source IRAS 19156+1906, at the the center of the L723 dark cloud. We detected emission from dust as well as emission from H2CO, DCN and CN, which arise from two cores, SMA 1 and SMA 2, separated by 2.9" (880 AU). SMA 2 is associated with VLA 2. SiO 5-4 emission is detected, possibly tracing a region of interaction between the dense envelope and the outflow. We modeled the dust and the H2CO emission from the two cores: they have similar physical properties but SMA 2 has a larger p-H2CO abundance than SMA 1. The p-H2CO abundances found are compatible with the value of the outer part of the circumstellar envelopes associated with Class 0 sources. SMA 2 is likely more evolved than SMA 1. The kinematics of the two sources show marginal evidence of infall and rotation motions. The mass detected by the SMA observation, which trace scales of ~1000 AU, is only a small fraction of the mass contained in the large scale molecular envelope, which suggests that L723 is still in a very early phase of star formation. Despite the apparent quiescent nature of the L723, fragmentation is occurring at the center of the cloud at different scales. Thus, at 1000 AU the cloud has fragmented in two cores, SMA 1 and SMA 2. At the same time, at least one of these cores, SMA 2, has undergone additional fragmentation at scales of 150 AU, forming a multiple stellar system.
  • HH 262 is a group of emitting knots displaying an "hour-glass" morphology in the Halpha and [SII] lines, located 3.5' to the northeast of the young stellar object L1551-IRS5, in Taurus. We present new results of the kinematics and physical conditions of HH 262 based on Integral Field Spectroscopy covering a field of 1.5'x3', which includes all the bright knots in HH 262. These data show complex kinematics and significant variations in physical conditions over the mapped region of HH 262 on a spatial scale of <3". A new result derived from the IFS data is the weakness of the [NII] emission (below detection limit in most of the mapped region of HH 262), including the brightest central knots. Our data reinforce the association of HH 262 with the redshifted lobe of the evolved molecular outflow L1551-IRS5. The interaction of this outflow with a younger one, powered by L1551 NE, around the position of HH 262 could give rise to the complex morphology and kinematics of HH 262.
  • We observed the HH 211 jet in the submillimeter continuum and the CO(3-2) and SiO(8-7) transitions with the Submillimeter Array. The continuum source detected at the center of the outflow shows an elongated morphology, perpendicular to the direction of the outflow axis. The high-velocity emission of both molecules shows a knotty and highly collimated structure. The SiO(8-7) emission at the base of the outflow, close to the driving source, spans a wide range of velocities, from -20 up to 40 km s^{-1}. This suggests that a wide-angle wind may be the driving mechanism of the HH 211 outflow. For distances greater than 5" (1500 AU) from the driving source, emission from both transitions follows a Hubble-law behavior, with SiO(8-7) reaching higher velocities than CO(3-2), and being located upstream of the CO(3-2) knots. This indicates that the SiO(8-7) emission is likely tracing entrained gas very close to the primary jet, while the CO(3-2) is tracing less dense entrained gas. From the SiO(5-4) data of Hirano et al. we find that the SiO(8-7)/SiO(5-4) brightness temperature ratio along the jet decreases for knots far from the driving source. This is consistent with the density decreasing along the jet, from (3-10)x10^6 cm^{-3} at 500 AU to (0.8-4)x10^6 cm^{-3} at 5000 AU from the driving source.
  • We have carried out an extensive observational study (from BIMA data) and made a preliminary theoretical investigation of the molecular gas around HH2. The molecular maps show a very complex morphological, kinematical and chemical structure. The overall main conclusion of this work confirms the findings of Paper I and II, by demonstrating that in addition to the strong photochemical effects caused by penetration of the UV photons from HH2 into molecular cloud, a range of complex radiative and dynamical interactions occur. Thus, despite the apparent `quiescent' nature of the molecular cloud ahead of HH2, the kinematical properties observed within the field of view suggest that it is possibly being driven out by powerful winds from the VLA 1 protostar.
  • The proto-planetary nebula Hen 3-1475 shows a remarkable highly collimated optical jet with an S-shaped string of three pairs of knots and extremely high velocities. We present here a detailed analysis of the overall morphology, kinematic structure and the excitation conditions of these knots based on deep ground-based high dispersion spectroscopy complemented with high spatial resolution spectroscopy obtained with STIS onboard HST, and WFPC2 [N II] images. The spectra obtained show double-peaked, extremely wide emission line profiles, and a decrease of the radial velocities with distance to the source in a step-like fashion. We find that the emission line ratios observed in the intermediate knots are consistent with a spectrum arising from the recombination region of a shock wave with shock velocities ranging from 100 to 150 km/s. We propose that the ejection velocity is varying as a function of time with a quasi-periodic variability (with timescale of the order of 100 years) and the direction of ejection is also varying with a precession period of the order of 1500 years.