• Magnetic activity on stars manifests itself in the form of dark spots on the stellar surface, that cause modulation of a few percent in the light curve of the star as it rotates. When a planet eclipses its host star, it might cross in front of one of these spots creating a "bump" in the transit light curve. By modelling these spot signatures, it is possible to determine the physical properties of the spots such as size, temperature, and location. In turn, the monitoring of the spots longitude provides estimates of the stellar rotation and differential rotation. This technique was applied to the star Kepler-17, a solar--type star orbited by a hot Jupiter. The model yields the following spot characteristics: average radius of $49 \pm 10$ Mm, temperatures of $5100 \pm 300$ K, and surface area coverage of $6 \pm 4$ \%. The rotation period at the transit latitude, $-5^\circ$, occulted by the planet was found to be $11.92 \pm 0.05$ d, slightly smaller than the out--of--transit average period of $12.4 \pm 0.1$ d. Adopting a solar like differential rotation, we estimated the differential rotation of Kepler-17 to be $\Delta\Omega = 0.041 \pm 0.005$ rd/d, which is close to the solar value of 0.050 rd/d, and a relative differential rotation of $\Delta\Omega/\Omega=8.0 \pm 0.9$ \%. Since Kepler-17 is much more active than our Sun, it appears that for this star larger rotation rate is more effective in the generation of magnetic fields than shear.
  • Aims. The wavelet transform has been used as a powerful tool for treating several problems in astrophysics. In this work, we show that the time-frequency analysis of stellar light curves using the wavelet transform is a practical tool for identifying rotation, magnetic activity, and pulsation signatures. We present the wavelet spectral composition and multiscale variations of the time series for four classes of stars: targets dominated by magnetic activity, stars with transiting planets, those with binary transits, and pulsating stars. Methods. We applied the Morlet wavelet (6th order), which offers high time and frequency resolution. By applying the wavelet transform to the signal, we obtain the wavelet local and global power spectra. The first is interpreted as energy distribution of the signal in time-frequency space, and the second is obtained by time integration of the local map. Results. Since the wavelet transform is a useful mathematical tool for nonstationary signals, this technique applied to Kepler and CoRoT light curves allows us to clearly identify particular signatures for different phenomena. In particular, patterns were identified for the temporal evolution of the rotation period and other periodicity due to active regions affecting these light curves. In addition, a beat-pattern signature in the local wavelet map of pulsating stars over the entire time span was also detected.