• We observed the accreting white dwarf 1E1339.8+2837 (1E1339) in the globular cluster M3 in Nov. 2003, May 2004 and Jan. 2005, using the Chandra ACIS-S detector. The source was observed in 1992 to possess traits of a supersoft X-ray source (SSS), with a 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity as large as 2x10^{35} erg/s, after which time the source's luminosity fell by roughly two orders of magnitude, adopting a hard X-ray spectrum more typical of CVs. Our observations confirm 1E1339's hard CV-like spectrum, with photon index Gamma=1.3+-0.2. We found 1E1339 to be highly variable, with a 0.5-10 keV luminosity ranging from 1.4+-0.3x10^{34} erg/s to 8.5+4.9-4.6x10^{32} erg/s, with 1E1339's maximum luminosity being perhaps the highest yet recorded for hard X-ray emission onto a white dwarf. In Jan. 2005, 1E1339 displayed substantial low-energy emission below 0.3 keV. Although current Chandra responses cannot properly model this emission, its bolometric luminosity appears comparable to or greater than that of the hard spectral component. This raises the possibility that the supersoft X-ray emission seen from 1E1339 in 1992 may have shifted to the far-UV.
  • Motivated by a paper (Kirsch et al. 2005) on possible use of the Crab Nebula as a standard candle for calibrating X-ray response functions, we examine consequences of intrinsic departures from a single (absorbed) power law upon such calibrations. We limit our analyses to three more modern X-ray instruments-the ROSAT/PSPC, the RXTE/PCA, and the XMM-Newton/EPIC-pn (burst mode). The results indicate a need to refine two of the three response functions studied. We are also able to distinguish between two current theoretical models for the system spectrum.
  • We report on archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the globular cluster M71 (NGC 6838). These observations, covering the core of the globular cluster, were performed by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). Inside the half-mass radius (r_h = 1.65') of M71, we find 33 candidate optical counterparts to 25 out of 29 Chandra X-ray sources while outside the half-mass radius, 6 possible optical counterparts to 4 X-ray sources are found. Based on the X-ray and optical properties of the identifications, we find 1 certain and 7 candidate cataclysmic variables (CVs). We also classify 2 and 12 X-ray sources as certain and potential chromospherically active binaries (ABs), respectively. The only star in the error circle of the known millisecond pulsar (MSP) is inconsistent with being the optical counterpart. The number of X-ray faint sources with L_x>4x10^{30} ergs/s (0.5-6.0 keV) found in M71 is higher than extrapolations from other clusters on the basis of either collision frequency or mass. Since the core density of M71 is relatively low, we suggest that those CVs and ABs are primordial in origin.
  • We observed the nearby, low-density globular cluster M71 (NGC 6838) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study its faint X-ray populations. Five X-ray sources were found inside the cluster core radius, including the known eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1953+1846A. The X-ray light curve of the source coincident with this MSP shows marginal evidence for periodicity at the binary period of 4.2 h. Its hard X-ray spectrum and luminosity resemble those of other eclipsing binary MSPs in 47 Tuc, suggesting a similar shock origin of the X-ray emission. A further 24 X-ray sources were found within the half-mass radius, reaching to a limiting luminosity of 1.5 10^30 erg/s (0.3-8 keV). From a radial distribution analysis, we find that 18+/-6 of these 29 sources are associated with M71, somewhat more than predicted, and that 11+/-6 are background sources, both galactic and extragalactic. M71 appears to have more X-ray sources between L_X=10^30--10^31 erg/s than expected by extrapolating from other studied clusters using either mass or collision frequency. We explore the spectra and variability of these sources, and describe the results of ground-based optical counterpart searches.
  • We present the results of a spectral study of the soft X-ray emission (0.2-2.5 keV) from low-latitude (`disk') regions of Jupiter. The data were obtained during two observing campaigns with XMM-Newton in April and November 2003. While the level of the emission remained approximately the same between April and the first half of the November observation, the second part of the latter shows an enhancement by about 40% in the 0.2-2.5 keV flux. A very similar, and apparently correlated increase, in time and scale, was observed in the solar X-ray and EUV flux. The months of October and November 2003 saw a period of particularly intense solar activity, which appears reflected in the behaviour of the soft X-rays from Jupiter's disk. The X-ray spectra, from the XMM-Newton EPIC CCD cameras, are all well fitted by a coronal model with temperatures in the range 0.4-0.5 keV, with additional line emission from Mg XI (1.35 keV) and Si XIII (1.86 keV): these are characteristic lines of solar X-ray spectra at maximum activity and during flares. The XMM-Newton observations lend further support to the theory that Jupiter's disk X-ray emission is controlled by the Sun, and may be produced in large part by scattering, elastic and fluorescent, of solar X-rays in the upper atmosphere of the planet.
  • NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory includes a Flight Contamination Monitor (FCM), a system of 16 radioactive calibration sources mounted to the inside of the Observatory's forward contamination cover. The purpose of the FCM is to verify the ground-to-orbit transfer of the Chandra flux scale, through comparison of data acquired during the ground calibration with those obtained in orbit, immediately prior to opening the Observatory's sun-shade door. Here we report results of these measurements, which place limits on the change in mirror--detector system response and, hence, on any accumulation of molecular contamination on the mirrors' iridium-coated surfaces.