• We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9-201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of `low' to `medium' activity, one broadband emission feature and numerous short-lived, narrowband, non-thermal emission features are evident. Our data represent a significant advance in low radio frequency solar imaging, enabling us to follow the spatial, spectral, and temporal evolution of events simultaneously and in unprecedented detail. The rich variety of features seen here reaffirms the coronal diagnostic capability of low radio frequency emission and provides an early glimpse of the nature of radio observations that will become available as the next generation of low frequency radio interferometers come on-line over the next few years.
  • The Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA) is a low frequency radio telescope, currently under construction, intended to search for the spectral signature of the epoch of re-ionisation (EOR) and to probe the structure of the solar corona. Sited in Western Australia, the full MWA will comprise 8192 dipoles grouped into 512 tiles, and be capable of imaging the sky south of 40 degree declination, from 80 MHz to 300 MHz with an instantaneous field of view that is tens of degrees wide and a resolution of a few arcminutes. A 32-station prototype of the MWA has been recently commissioned and a set of observations taken that exercise the whole acquisition and processing pipeline. We present Stokes I, Q, and U images from two ~4 hour integrations of a field 20 degrees wide centered on Pictoris A. These images demonstrate the capacity and stability of a real-time calibration and imaging technique employing the weighted addition of warped snapshots to counter extreme wide field imaging distortions.
  • The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a next-generation radio telescope currently under construction in the remote Western Australia Outback. Raw data will be generated continuously at 5GiB/s, grouped into 8s cadences. This high throughput motivates the development of on-site, real time processing and reduction in preference to archiving, transport and off-line processing. Each batch of 8s data must be completely reduced before the next batch arrives. Maintaining real time operation will require a sustained performance of around 2.5TFLOP/s (including convolutions, FFTs, interpolations and matrix multiplications). We describe a scalable heterogeneous computing pipeline implementation, exploiting both the high computing density and FLOP-per-Watt ratio of modern GPUs. The architecture is highly parallel within and across nodes, with all major processing elements performed by GPUs. Necessary scatter-gather operations along the pipeline are loosely synchronized between the nodes hosting the GPUs. The MWA will be a frontier scientific instrument and a pathfinder for planned peta- and exascale facilities.
  • Giant planets embedded in circumstellar discs are expected to open gaps in these discs. We examine the vertical structure of the gap edges. We find that the planet excites spiral arms with significant (Mach number of a half) vertical motion of the gas, and discuss the implications of these motions. In particular, the spiral arms will induce strong vertical stirring of the dust, making the edge appeared `puffed up' relative to the bulk of the disc. Infra-red observations (sensitive to dust) would be dominated by the light from the thick inner edge of the disc. Sub-millimetre observations (sensitive to gas velocities) would appear to be hot in `turbulent' motions (actually the ordered motion caused by the passage of the spiral arms), but cold in chemistry. Resolved sub-millimetre maps of circumstellar discs might even be able to detect the spiral arms directly.
  • As stars evolve along the Asymptotic Giant Branch, strong winds are driven from the outer envelope. These winds form a shell, which may ultimately become a planetary nebula. Many planetary nebulae are highly asymmetric, hinting at the presence of a binary companion. Some post-Asymptotic Giant Branch objects are surrounded by torii of crystalline dust, but there is no generally accepted mechanism for annealing the amorphous grains in the wind to crystals. In this Letter, we show that the shaping of the wind by a binary companion is likely to lead to the formation of crystalline dust in the orbital plane of the binary.
  • Many extra-solar planets discovered over the past decade are gas giants in tight orbits around their host stars. Due to the difficulties of forming these `hot Jupiters' in situ, they are generally assumed to have migrated to their present orbits through interactions with their nascent discs. In this paper, we present a systematic study of giant planet migration in power law discs. We find that the planetary migration rate is proportional to the disc surface density. This is inconsistent with the assumption that the migration rate is simply the viscous drift speed of the disc. However, this result can be obtained by balancing the angular momentum of the planet with the viscous torque in the disc. We have verified that this result is not affected by adjusting the resolution of the grid, the smoothing length used, or the time at which the planet is released to migrate.
  • We perform numerical simulations of a disc-planet system using various grid-based and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) codes. The tests are run for a simple setup where Jupiter and Neptune mass planets on a circular orbit open a gap in a protoplanetary disc during a few hundred orbital periods. We compare the surface density contours, potential vorticity and smoothed radial profiles at several times. The disc mass and gravitational torque time evolution are analyzed with high temporal resolution. There is overall consistency between the codes. The density profiles agree within about 5% for the Eulerian simulations while the SPH results predict the correct shape of the gap although have less resolution in the low density regions and weaker planetary wakes. The disc masses after 200 orbital periods agree within 10%. The spread is larger in the tidal torques acting on the planet which agree within a factor 2 at the end of the simulation. In the Neptune case the dispersion in the torques is greater than for Jupiter, possibly owing to the contribution from the not completely cleared region close to the planet.
  • We examine the effect of a rapidly migrating protoplanet on a ring of planetesimals. The eccentricities of the planetesimals are usually increased by $\Delta e \in (0.01, 0.1)$, with the exact increase being proportional to the protoplanet's mass, and inversely proportional to its migration rate. The eccentricity distribution is also substantially changed from a Rayleigh distribution. We discuss the possible implications for further planet formation, and suggest that the rapid passage of a protoplanet may not prevent the planetesimal disc from forming further planets.
  • If a point mass moves through a uniform gas cloud, at what rate does it accrete material? This is the question studied by Bondi, Hoyle and Lyttleton. This paper draws together the work performed in this area since the problem was first studied. Time has shown that, despite the simplifications made, Bondi, Hoyle and Lyttleton made quite accurate predictions for the accretion rate. Bondi--Hoyle--Lyttleton accretion has found application in many fields of astronomy, and these are also discussed.
  • We apply an algorithm for radiative feedback on a dusty flow (detailed in Edgar and Clarke (2003)) to the problem of Bondi--Hoyle accretion. This calculation is potentially relevant to the formation of massive stars in ultradense cores of stellar clusters. We find that radiative feedback is \emph{more effective} than in the case of previous calculations in spherical symmetry. The Bondi-Hoyle geometry implies that material is flowing nearly tangentially when it experiences the sharp radiative impulse at the dust destruction radius, and consequently it is readily perturbed into outflowing orbits. We find that it is difficult for stellar masses to grow beyond around 10 M_sol (for standard interstellar dust abundances). We discuss the possible implications of this result for the formation mechanism of OB stars in cluster cores. We end by proposing a series of conditions which must be fulfilled if Bondi--Hoyle accretion is to continue.
  • We have developed a simplified method of treating the radiative acceleration of dusty flows. This method retains the sharp impulse at the dust destruction radius that is a feature of frequency dependent radiative transfer, whilst placing minimal demands on computing resources. As such, it is suitable for inclusion in hydrodynamic codes. We have applied this method to the formation of massive stars in spherical geometry, and find that the fraction of a cloud which can accrete on to the central star is a strong function of the Jeans' Number and density profile of the cloud. Massive star formation is favoured by cold homogeneous conditions, as might result in regions where gas is swept up by some external triggering agent. We find (in contrast to previous authors) that massive star formation does not require a depleted dust mixture, although the use of dust at typical interstellar abundances does reduce the final stellar mass compared to cores formed from a depleted mixture.