• Using the two large cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, Horizon-AGN (H-AGN) and Horizon-noAGN (H-noAGN, no AGN feedback), we investigate how a typical sub-grid model for AGN feedback affects the evolution of the total density profiles (dark matter + stars) at the effective radius of massive early-type galaxies (M*>10^11 Msun). We have studied the dependencies of the mass-weighted density slope gamma'_tot with the effective radius, the galaxy mass and the host halo mass at z~0.3 and found that the inclusion of AGN feedbackalways leads to a much better agreement with observational values and trends. Our analysis suggests also that the inclusion of AGN feedback favours a strong correlation between gamma'_tot and the density slope of the dark matter component while, in the absence of AGN activity, gamma'_tot is rather strongly correlated with the density slope of the stellar component. Finally, we find that gamma'_tot derived from our samples of galaxies increases from z=2 to z=0,in good agreement with the expected observational trend. The derived slopes are slightly lower than in the data when AGN is included because the simulated galaxies tend to be too extended, especially the least massive ones. However, the simulated compact galaxies without AGN feedback have gamma'_tot values that are significantly too high compared to observations.
  • Using a suite of three large cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, Horizon-AGN, Horizon-noAGN (no AGN feedback) and Horizon-DM (no baryons), we investigate how a typical sub-grid model for AGN feedback affects the evolution of the inner density profiles of massive dark matter haloes and galaxies. Based on direct object-to-object comparisons, we find that the integrated inner mass and density slope differences between objects formed in these three simulations (hereafter, H_AGN, H_noAGN and H_DM) significantly evolve with time. More specifically, at high redshift (z~5), the mean central density profiles of H_AGN and H_noAGN dark matter haloes tend to be much steeper than their H_DM counterparts owing to the rapidly growing baryonic component and ensuing adiabatic contraction. By z~1.5, these mean halo density profiles in H_AGN have flattened, pummelled by powerful AGN activity ("quasar mode"): the integrated inner mass difference gaps with H_noAGN haloes have widened, and those with H_DM haloes have narrowed. Fast forward 9.5 billion years, down to z=0, and the trend reverses: H_AGN halo mean density profiles drift back to a more cusped shape as AGN feedback efficiency dwindles ("radio mode"), and the gaps in integrated central mass difference with H_noAGN and H_DM close and broaden respectively. On the galaxy side, the story differs noticeably. Averaged stellar profile central densities and inner slopes are monotonically reduced by AGN activity as a function of cosmic time, resulting in better agreement with local observations. As both dark matter and stellar inner density profiles respond quite sensitively to the presence of a central AGN, there is hope that future observational determinations of these quantities can be used constrain AGN feedback models.
  • We present an analysis of high-resolution ALMA interferometry of CO(4-3) line emission and dust continuum in the "Ruby" (PLCK_G244.8+54.9), a bright, gravitationally lensed galaxy at z = 3.0 discovered with the Planck all-sky survey. The Ruby is the brightest of Planck's Dusty GEMS, a sample of 11 of the brightest gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies on the extragalactic sub-mm sky. We resolve the high-surface-brightness continuum and CO line emission of the Ruby in several extended clumps along a partial, nearly circular Einstein ring with 1.4" diameter around a massive galaxy at z = 1.5. Local star-formation intensities are up to 2000 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$, amongst the highest observed at high redshift, and clearly in the range of maximal starbursts. Gas-mass surface densities are a few $\times$ 10$^4$ M$_{\odot}$ pc$^{-2}$. The Ruby lies at, and in part even above, the starburst sequence in the Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram, and at the limit expected for star formation that is self-regulated through the kinetic energy injection from radiation pressure, stellar winds, and supernovae. We show that these processes can also inject sufficient kinetic energy and momentum into the gas to explain the turbulent line widths, which are consistent with marginally gravitationally bound molecular clouds embedded in a critically Toomre-stable disk. The star-formation efficiency is in the range 1-10% per free-fall time, consistent with the notion that the pressure balance that sets the local star-formation law in the Milky Way may well be universal out to the highest star-formation intensities. AGN feedback is not necessary to regulate the star formation in the Ruby, in agreement with the absence of a bright AGN component in the infrared and radio regimes.
  • Context. Upcoming weak lensing surveys such as Euclid will provide an unprecedented opportunity to quantify the geometry and topology of the cosmic web, in particular in the vicinity of lensing clusters. Aims. Understanding the connectivity of the cosmic web with unbiased mass tracers, such as weak lensing, is of prime importance to probe the underlying cosmology, seek dynamical signatures of dark matter, and quantify environmental effects on galaxy formation. Methods. Mock catalogues of galaxy clusters are extracted from the N-body PLUS simulation. For each cluster, the aperture multipolar moments of the convergence are calculated in two annuli (inside and outside the virial radius). By stacking their modulus, a statistical estimator is built to characterise the angular mass distribution around clusters. The moments are compared to predictions from perturbation theory and spherical collapse. Results. The main weakly chromatic excess of multipolar power on large scales is understood as arising from the contraction of the primordial cosmic web driven by the growing potential well of the cluster. Besides this boost, the quadrupole prevails in the cluster (ellipsoidal) core, while at the outskirts, harmonic distortions are spread on small angular modes, and trace the non-linear sharpening of the filamentary structures. Predictions for the signal amplitude as a function of the cluster-centric distance, mass, and redshift are presented. The prospects of measuring this signal are estimated for current and future lensing data sets. Conclusions. The Euclid mission should provide all the necessary information for studying the cosmic evolution of the connectivity of the cosmic web around lensing clusters using multipolar moments and probing unique signatures of, for example, baryons and warm dark matter.
  • We study the properties of the foreground galaxy of the Ruby, the brightest gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxy on the sub-millimeter sky as probed by the Planck satellite, and part of our sample of Planck's Dusty GEMS. The Ruby consists of an Einstein ring of 1.4" diameter at z = 3.005 observed with ALMA at 0.1" resolution, centered on a faint, red, massive lensing galaxy seen with HST/WFC3, which itself has an exceptionally high redshift, z = 1.525 $\pm$ 0.001, as confirmed with VLT/X-Shooter spectroscopy. Here we focus on the properties of the lens and the lensing model obtained with LENSTOOL. The rest-frame optical morphology of this system is strongly dominated by the lens, while the Ruby itself is highly obscured, and contributes less than 10% to the photometry out to the K band. The foreground galaxy has a lensing mass of (3.70 $\pm$ 0.35) $\times$ 10$^{11}$ M$_{\odot}$. Magnification factors are between 7 and 38 for individual clumps forming two image families along the Einstein ring. We present a decomposition of the foreground and background sources in the WFC3 images, and stellar population synthesis modeling with a range of star-formation histories for Chabrier and Salpeter initial mass functions (IMFs). Only the stellar mass range obtained with the latter agrees well with the lensing mass. This is consistent with the bottom-heavy IMFs of massive high-redshift galaxies expected from detailed studies of the stellar masses and mass profiles of their low-redshift descendants, and from models of turbulent gas fragmentation. This may be the first direct constraint on the IMF in a lens at z = 1.5, which is not a cluster central galaxy.
  • We present ALMA and VLA detections of the dense molecular gas tracers HCN, HCO$^+$ and HNC in two lensed, high-redshift starbursts selected from the {\it Herschel}-ATLAS survey: {\it H}-ATLAS\,J090740.0$-$004200 (SDP.9, $z \sim 1.6$) and {\it H}-ATLAS\,J091043.1$-$000321 (SDP.11, $z \sim 1.8$). ALMA observed the $J = 3-2$ transitions in both sources, while the VLA observed the $J = 1-0$ transitions in SDP.9. We have detected all observed HCN and HCO$^+$ lines in SDP.9 and SDP.11, and also HNC(3--2) in SDP.9. The amplification factors for both galaxies have been determined from sub-arcsec resolution CO and dust emission observations carried out with NOEMA and the SMA. The HNC(1--0)/HCN(1--0) line ratio in SDP.9 suggests the presence of photon-dominated regions, as it happens to most local (U)LIRGs. The CO, HCN and HCO$^+$ SLEDs of SDP.9 are compatible to those found for many local, infrared (IR) bright galaxies, indicating that the molecular gas in local and high-redshift dusty starbursts can have similar excitation conditions. We obtain that the correlation between total IR ($L_{\rm IR}$) and dense line ($L_{\rm dense}$) luminosity in SDP.9 and SDP.11 and local star-forming galaxies can be represented by a single relation. The scatter of the $L_{\rm IR} - L_{\rm dense}$ correlation, together with the lack of sensitive dense molecular gas tracer observations for a homogeneous sample of high-redshift galaxies, prevents us from distinguishing differential trends with redshift. Our results suggest that the intense star formation found in some high-redshift dusty, luminous starbursts is associated with more massive dense molecular gas reservoirs and higher dense molecular gas fractions.
  • (abridged) We report rest-frame submillimeter H2O emission line observations of 11 HyLIRGs/ULIRGs at z~2-4 selected among the brightest lensed galaxies discovered in the Herschel-ATLAS. Using the IRAM NOEMA, we have detected 14 new H2O emission lines. The apparent luminosities of the H2O emission lines are $\mu L_{\rm{H_2O}} \sim 6-21 \times 10^8 L_\odot$, with velocity-integrated line fluxes ranging from 4-15 Jy km s$^{-1}$. We have also observed CO emission lines using EMIR on the IRAM 30m telescope in seven sources. The velocity widths for CO and H2O lines are found to be similar. With almost comparable integrated flux densities to those of the high-J CO line, H2O is found to be among the strongest molecular emitters in high-z Hy/ULIRGs. We also confirm our previously found correlation between luminosity of H2O ($L_{\rm{H_2O}}$) and infrared ($L_{\rm{IR}}$) that $L_{\rm{H_2O}} \sim L_{\rm{IR}}^{1.1-1.2}$, with our new detections. This correlation could be explained by a dominant role of far-infrared (FIR) pumping in the H2O excitation. Modelling reveals the FIR radiation fields have warm dust temperature $T_\rm{warm}$~45-75 K, H2O column density per unit velocity interval $N_{\rm{H_2O}}/\Delta V \gtrsim 0.3 \times 10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$ km$^{-1}$ s and 100 $\mu$m continuum opacity $\tau_{100} > 1$ (optically thick), indicating that H2O is likely to trace highly obscured warm dense gas. However, further observations of $J\geq4$ H2O lines are needed to better constrain the continuum optical depth and other physical conditions of the molecular gas and dust. We have also detected H2O+ emission in three sources. A tight correlation between $L_{\rm{H_2O}}$ and $L_{\rm{H_2O^+}}$ has been found in galaxies from low to high redshift. The velocity-integrated flux density ratio between H2O+ and H2O suggests that cosmic rays generated by strong star formation are possibly driving the H2O+ formation.
  • We present MUSE observations in the core of the HFF galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223, where the first magnified and spatially-resolved multiple images of SN 'Refsdal' at redshift 1.489 were detected. Thanks to a DDT program with the VLT and the extraordinary efficiency of MUSE, we measure 117 secure redshifts with just 4.8 hours of total integration time on a single target pointing. We spectroscopically confirm 68 galaxy cluster members, with redshift values ranging from 0.5272 to 0.5660, and 18 multiple images belonging to 7 background, lensed sources distributed in redshifts between 1.240 and 3.703. Starting from the combination of our catalog with those obtained from extensive spectroscopic and photometric campaigns using the HST, we select a sample of 300 (164 spectroscopic and 136 photometric) cluster members, within approximately 500 kpc from the BCG, and a set of 88 reliable multiple images associated to 10 different background source galaxies and 18 distinct knots in the spiral galaxy hosting SN 'Refsdal'. We exploit this valuable information to build 6 detailed strong lensing models, the best of which reproduces the observed positions of the multiple images with a rms offset of only 0.26". We use these models to quantify the statistical and systematic errors on the predicted values of magnification and time delay of the next emerging image of SN 'Refsdal'. We find that its peak luminosity should should occur between March and June 2016, and should be approximately 20% fainter than the dimmest (S4) of the previously detected images but above the detection limit of the planned HST/WFC3 follow-up. We present our two-dimensional reconstruction of the cluster mass density distribution and of the SN 'Refsdal' host galaxy surface brightness distribution. We outline the roadmap towards even better strong lensing models with a synergetic MUSE and HST effort.
  • Supernova (SN) Refsdal is the first multiply-imaged, highly-magnified, and spatially-resolved SN ever observed. The SN exploded in a highly-magnified spiral galaxy at z=1.49 behind the Frontier Fields Cluster MACS1149, and provides a unique opportunity to study the environment of SNe at high z. We exploit the time delay between multiple images to determine the properties of the SN and its environment, before, during, and after the SN exploded. We use the integral-field spectrograph MUSE on the VLT to simultaneously target all observed and model-predicted positions of SN Refsdal. We find MgII emission at all positions of SN Refsdal, accompanied by weak FeII* emission at two positions. The measured ratios of [OII] to MgII emission of 10-20 indicate a high degree of ionization with low metallicity. Because the same high degree of ionization is found in all images, and our spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve the region of influence of SN Refsdal, we conclude that this high degree of ionization has been produced by previous SNe or a young and hot stellar population. We find no variability of the [OII] line over a period of 57 days. This suggests that there is no variation in the [OII] luminosity of the SN over this period, or that the SN has a small contribution to the integrated [OII] emission over the scale resolved by our observations.
  • We give an overview of the Grism Lens Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS), a large Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at obtaining grism spectroscopy of the fields of ten massive clusters of galaxies at redshift z=0.308-0.686, including the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF). The Wide Field Camera 3 yields near infrared spectra of the cluster cores, covering the wavelength range 0.81-1.69mum through grisms G102 and G141, while the Advanced Camera for Surveys in parallel mode provides G800L spectra of the infall regions of the clusters. The WFC3 spectra are taken at two almost orthogonal position angles in order to minimize the effects of confusion. After summarizing the scientific drivers of GLASS, we describe the sample selection as well as the observing strategy and data processing pipeline. We then utilize MACSJ0717.5+3745, a HFF cluster and the first one observed by GLASS, to illustrate the data quality and the high-level data products. Each spectrum brighter than H_AB=23 is visually inspected by at least two co-authors and a redshift is measured when sufficient information is present in the spectra. Furthermore, we conducted a thorough search for emission lines through all the GLASS WFC3 spectra with the aim of measuring redshifts for sources with continuum fainter than H_AB=23. We provide a catalog of 139 emission-line based spectroscopic redshifts for extragalactic sources, including three new redshifts of multiple image systems (one probable, two tentative). In addition to the data itself we also release software tools that are helpful to navigate the data.
  • We describe the search for Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) near the sub-millimeter bright starburst galaxy HFLS3 at $z$$=$6.34 and a study on the environment of this massive galaxy during the end of reionization.We performed two independent selections of LBGs on images obtained with the \textit{Gran Telescopio Canarias} (GTC) and the \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} (HST) by combining non-detections in bands blueward of the Lyman-break and color selection. A total of 10 objects fulfilling the LBG selection criteria at $z$$>$5.5 were selected over the 4.54 and 55.5 arcmin$^2$ covered by our HST and GTC images, respectively. The photometric redshift, UV luminosity, and the star-formation rate of these sources were estimated with models of their spectral energy distribution. These $z$$\sim$6 candidates have physical properties and number densities in agreement with previous results. The UV luminosity function at $z$$\sim$6 and a Voronoi tessellation analysis of this field shows no strong evidence for an overdensity of relatively bright objects (m$_{F105W}$$<$25.9) associated with \textit{HFLS3}. However, the over-density parameter deduced from this field and the surface density of objects can not excluded definitively the LBG over-density hypothesis. Moreover we identified three faint objects at less than three arcseconds from \textit{HFLS3} with color consistent with those expected for $z$$\sim$6 galaxies. Deeper data are needed to confirm their redshifts and to study their association with \textit{HFLS3} and the galaxy merger that may be responsible for the massive starburst.
  • The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) has identified large numbers of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) over a wide range in redshift. A detailed understanding of these DSFGs is hampered by the limited spatial resolution of Herschel. We present 870um 0.45" resolution imaging from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of 29 HerMES DSFGs with far-infrared (FIR) flux densities in between the brightest of sources found by Herschel and fainter DSFGs found in ground-based sub-millimeter (sub-mm) surveys. We identify 62 sources down to the 5-sigma point-source sensitivity limit in our ALMA sample (sigma~0.2mJy), of which 6 are strongly lensed (showing multiple images) and 36 experience significant amplification (mu>1.1). To characterize the properties of the ALMA sources, we introduce and make use of uvmcmcfit, a publicly available Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis tool for interferometric observations of lensed galaxies. Our lens models tentatively favor intrinsic number counts for DSFGs with a steep fall off above 8mJy at 880um. Nearly 70% of the Herschel sources comprise multiple ALMA counterparts, consistent with previous research indicating that the multiplicity rate is high in bright sub-mm sources. Our ALMA sources are located significantly closer to each other than expected based on results from theoretical models as well as fainter DSFGs identified in the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey. The high multiplicity rate and low projected separations argue in favor of interactions and mergers driving the prodigious emission from the brightest DSFGs as well as the sharp downturn above S_880=8mJy.
  • We have modelled Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) long baseline imaging of the strong gravitational lens system H-ATLAS J090311.6+003906 (SDP.81). We have reconstructed the distribution of band 6 and 7 continuum emission in the z=3.042 source and we have determined its kinematic properties by reconstructing CO(5-4) and CO(8-7) line emission in bands 4 and 6. The continuum imaging reveals a highly non-uniform distribution of dust with clumps on scales of 200 pc. In contrast, the CO line emission shows a relatively smooth, disk-like velocity field which is well fit by a rotating disk model with an inclination angle of 40+/-5 degrees and an asymptotic rotation velocity of 320 km/s. The inferred dynamical mass within 1.5kpc is (3.5+/-0.5)x10^{10} M_sol which is comparable to the total molecular gas masses of (2.7+/-0.5)x10^{10} M_sol and (3.5+/-0.6)x10^{10} M_sol from the dust continuum emission and CO emission respectively. Our new reconstruction of the lensed HST near-infrared emission shows two objects which appear to be interacting, with the rotating disk of gas and dust revealed by ALMA distinctly offset from the near-infrared emission. The clumpy nature of the dust and a low value of the Toomre parameter of Q=0.3 suggest that the disk is in a state of collapse. We estimate a star formation rate in the disk of 470+/-80 M_sol/yr with an efficiency 65 times greater than typical low-redshift galaxies. Our findings add to the growing body of evidence that the most infra-red luminous, dust obscured galaxies in the high redshift Universe represent a population of merger induced starbursts.
  • We discuss the restframe UV emission from the starbursting galaxy HFLS3 at z=6.34, discovered in Herschel/SPIRE data due to its red color in the submm wavelengths from 250-500 um. The apparent inst. SFR of HFLS3 inferred from the total FIR luminosity measured with over 15 photometric data points between 100 to 1000 um is 2900 Msun/yr. Keck/NIRC2 Ks band adaptive optics imaging data showed two potential NIR counterparts near HFLS3. Previously, the northern galaxy was taken to be in the foreground at z=2.1 while the southern galaxy was assumed to HFLS3's NIR counterpart. New HST/WFC3 and ACS imaging data show both optically bright galaxies are in the foreground at z<6. A new lensing model based on HST data and mm-wave continuum emission yields a magnification of 2.2+/-0.3. The lack of multiple imaging constrains the lensing magnification to be lower than either 2.7 or 3.5 at the 95% confidence level for the two scenarios, which attribute one or two components to HFLS3 in the source plane. Correcting for gravitational lensing, the inst. SFR is 1320 Msun/yr with the 95% confidence lower limit around 830 Msun/yr. Using models for the restframe UV to FIR SED, the ave. SFR over the last 100 Myr is around 660 Msun/yr. The dust and stellar masses of HFLS3 from the same SED models are 3x10^8 Msun and ~5x10^10 Msun, respectively, with large systematic uncertainties on assumptions related to the SED model. With HST/WFC3 images we also find diffuse NIR emission about 0.5" (~3 kpc) SW of HFLS3 that remains undetected in the ACS data. The emission has a photometric redshift consistent with either z~6 or a dusty galaxy template at z~2. If at the same redshift as HFLS3 the detected diffuse emission could be part of the complex merger system that could be triggering the starburst. Alternatively, it could be part of the foreground structure at z~2.1 that is responsible for lensing of HFLS3.
  • Constraints on the mass distribution in high-redshift clusters of galaxies are not currently very strong. We aim to constrain the mass profile, M(r), and dynamical status of the $z \sim 0.8$ LCDCS 0504 cluster of galaxies characterized by prominent giant gravitational arcs near its center. Our analysis is based on deep X-ray, optical, and infrared imaging, as well as optical spectroscopy. We model the mass distribution of the cluster with three different mass density profiles, whose parameters are constrained by the strong lensing features of the inner cluster region, by the X-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium, and by the kinematics of 71 cluster members. We obtain consistent M(r) determinations from three methods (dispersion-kurtosis, caustics and MAMPOSSt), out to the cluster virial radius and beyond. The mass profile inferred by the strong lensing analysis in the central cluster region is slightly above, but still consistent with, the kinematics estimate. On the other hand, the X-ray based M(r) is significantly below both the kinematics and strong lensing estimates. Theoretical predictions from $\Lambda$CDM cosmology for the concentration--mass relation are in agreement with our observational results, when taking into account the uncertainties in both the observational and theoretical estimates. There appears to be a central deficit in the intra-cluster gas mass fraction compared to nearby clusters. Despite the relaxed appearance of this cluster, the determinations of its mass profile by different probes show substantial discrepancies, the origin of which remains to be determined. The extension of a similar dynamical analysis to other clusters of the DAFT/FADA survey will allow to shed light on the possible systematics that affect the determination of mass profiles of high-z clusters, possibly related to our incomplete understanding of intracluster baryon physics.
  • The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Large Program, which will obtain 140 orbits of grism spectroscopy of the core and infall regions of 10 galaxy clusters, selected to be among the very best cosmic telescopes. Extensive HST imaging is available from many sources including the CLASH and Frontier Fields programs. We introduce the survey by analyzing spectra of faint multiply-imaged galaxies and $z\gtrsim6$ galaxy candidates obtained from the first seven orbits out of fourteen targeting the core of the Frontier Fields cluster MACS0717.5+3745. Using the G102 and G141 grisms to cover the wavelength range 0.8-1.7$\mu$m, we confirm 4 strongly lensed systems by detecting emission lines in each of the images. For the 9 $z\gtrsim6$ galaxy candidates clear from contamination, we do not detect any emission lines down to a seven-orbit 1$\sigma$ noise level of $\sim$5$\times$10$^{-18}$erg s$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$. Taking lensing magnification into account, our flux sensitivity reaches $\sim$0.2-5$\times$10$^{-18}$erg s$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$. These limits over an uninterrupted wavelength range rule out the possibility that the high-$z$ galaxy candidates are instead strong line emitters at lower redshift. These results show that by means of careful modeling of the background - and with the assistance of lensing magnification - interesting flux limits can be reached for large numbers of objects, avoiding pre-selection and the wavelength restrictions inherent to ground-based multi-slit spectroscopy. These observations confirm the power of slitless HST spectroscopy even in fields as crowded as a cluster core.
  • We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range is available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter cosmology.XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. Only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster pericentre approach and are relatively recent infalls. We also find hints of a decreasing X-ray gas density profile core radius with redshift. The percentage of mass included in substructures was found to be roughly constant with redshift with values of 5-15%, in agreement both with the general CDM framework and with the results of numerical simulations. Galaxies in substructures show the same general behaviour as regular cluster galaxies; however, in substructures, there is a deficiency of both late type and old stellar population galaxies. Late type galaxies with recent bursts of star formation seem to be missing in the substructures close to the bottom of the host cluster potential well. However, our sample would need to be increased to allow a more robust analysis.
  • Strong gravitational lenses are now being routinely discovered in wide-field surveys at (sub)millimeter wavelengths. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) high-spatial resolution imaging and Gemini-South and Multiple Mirror Telescope optical spectroscopy of strong lens candidates discovered in the two widest extragalactic surveys conducted by the Herschel Space Observatory: the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). From a sample of 30 Herschel sources with S_500>100 mJy, 21 are strongly lensed (multiply imaged), 4 are moderately lensed (singly imaged), and the remainder require additional data to determine their lensing status. We apply a visibility-plane lens modeling technique to the SMA data to recover information about the masses of the lenses as well as the intrinsic (i.e., unlensed) sizes (r_half) and far-infrared luminosities (L_FIR) of the lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). The sample of lenses comprises primarily isolated massive galaxies, but includes some groups and clusters as well. Several of the lenses are located at z_lens>0.7, a redshift regime that is inaccessible to lens searches based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy. The lensed SMGs are amplified by factors that are significantly below statistical model predictions given the 500um flux densities of our sample. We speculate that this may reflect a deficiency in our understanding of the intrinsic sizes and luminosities of the brightest SMGs. The lensed SMGs span nearly one decade in L_FIR (median L_FIR=7.9x10^12 L_sun) and two decades in FIR luminosity surface density (median Sigma_FIR=6.0x10^11 L_sun kpc^-2). The strong lenses in this sample and others identified via (sub-)mm surveys will provide a wealth of information regarding the astrophysics of galaxy formation and evolution over a wide range in redshift.
  • We present the weak lensing and optical analysis of the SL2S-ARCS (SARCS) sample of strong lens candidates. The sample is based on the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey (SL2S), a systematic search of strong lensing systems in the photometric Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). The SARCS sample focuses on arc-like features and is designed to contain mostly galaxy groups. We briefly present the weak lensing methodology that we use to estimate the mass of the SARCS objects. Among 126 candidates, we obtain a weak lensing detection for 89 objects with velocity dispersions of the Singular Isothermal Sphere mass model ranging from 350 to 1000 km/s with an average value of 600km/s, corresponding to a rich galaxy group (or poor cluster). From the galaxies belonging to the bright end of the group's red sequence (M_i<-21), we derive the optical properties of the SARCS candidates. We obtain typical richnesses of N=5-15 galaxies and optical luminosities of L=0.5-1.5e+12 Lsol (within a radius of 0.5 Mpc). We use these galaxies to compute luminosity density maps, from which a morphological classification reveals that a large fraction of the sample are groups with a complex light distribution, either elliptical or multimodal, suggesting that these objects are dynamically young structures. We finally combine the lensing and optical analyses to draw a sample of 80 most secure group candidates, i.e. weak lensing detection and over-density at the lens position in the luminosity map, to remove false detections and galaxy-scale systems from the initial sample. We use this reduced sample to probe the optical scaling relations in combination with a sample of massive galaxy clusters. We detect the expected correlations over the probed range in mass with a typical scatter of 25% in the SIS velocity dispersion at a given richness or luminosity, making these scaling laws interesting mass proxies
  • Massive present-day early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies probably gained the bulk of their stellar mass and heavy elements through intense, dust-enshrouded starbursts - that is, increased rates of star formation - in the most massive dark matter halos at early epochs. However, it remains unknown how soon after the Big Bang such massive starburst progenitors exist. The measured redshift distribution of dusty, massive starbursts has long been suspected to be biased low in redshift owing to selection effects, as confirmed by recent findings of systems out to redshift z~5. Here we report the identification of a massive starburst galaxy at redshift 6.34 through a submillimeter color-selection technique. We unambiguously determined the redshift from a suite of molecular and atomic fine structure cooling lines. These measurements reveal a hundred billion solar masses of highly excited, chemically evolved interstellar medium in this galaxy, which constitutes at least 40% of the baryonic mass. A "maximum starburst" converts the gas into stars at a rate more than 2,000 times that of the Milky Way, a rate among the highest observed at any epoch. Despite the overall downturn of cosmic star formation towards the highest redshifts, it seems that environments mature enough to form the most massive, intense starbursts existed at least as early as 880 million years after the Big Bang.
  • Using IRAM PdBI we report the detection of H2O in six new lensed ultra-luminous starburst galaxies at high redshift, discovered in the Herschel H-ATLAS survey. The sources are detected either in the 2_{02}-1_{11} or 2_{11}-2_{02} H_2O emission lines with integrated line fluxes ranging from 1.8 to 14 Jy.km/s. The corresponding apparent luminosities are mu x L_H2O ~ 3-12 x 10^8 Lo, where mu is the lensing magnification factor (3 < mu < 12). These results confirm that H2O lines are among the strongest molecular lines in such galaxies, with intensities almost comparable to those of the high-J CO lines, and same profiles and line widths (200-900 km/s) as the latter. With the current sensitivity of PdBI, H2O can therefore easily be detected in high-z lensed galaxies (with F(500um) > 100 mJy) discovered in the Herschel surveys. Correcting the luminosities for lensing amplification, L_H2O is found to have a strong dependence on the IR luminosity, varying as ~L_IR^{1.2}. This relation which needs to be confirmed with better statistics, may indicate a role of radiative (IR) excitation of the H2O lines, and implies that high-z galaxies with L_IR >~ 10^13 Lo tend to be very strong emitters in H2O, that have no equivalent in the local universe.
  • We present a list of 13 candidate gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) from 95 square degrees of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, a surface density of 0.14\pm0.04deg^{-2}. The selected sources have 500um flux densities (S_500) greater than 100mJy. Gravitational lensing is confirmed by follow-up observations in 9 of the 13 systems (70%), and the lensing status of the four remaining sources is undetermined. We also present a supplementary sample of 29 (0.31\pm0.06deg^{-2}) gravitationally lensed SMG candidates with S_500=80--100mJy, which are expected to contain a higher fraction of interlopers than the primary candidates. The number counts of the candidate lensed galaxies are consistent with a simple statistical model of the lensing rate, which uses a foreground matter distribution, the intrinsic SMG number counts, and an assumed SMG redshift distribution. The model predicts that 32--74% of our S_500>100mJy candidates are strongly gravitationally lensed (mu>2), with the brightest sources being the most robust; this is consistent with the observational data. Our statistical model also predicts that, on average, lensed galaxies with S_500=100mJy are magnified by factors of ~9, with apparently brighter galaxies having progressively higher average magnification, due to the shape of the intrinsic number counts. 65% of the sources are expected to have intrinsic 500micron flux densities less than 30mJy. Thus, samples of strongly gravitationally lensed SMGs, such as those presented here, probe below the nominal Herschel detection limit at 500 micron. They are good targets for the detailed study of the physical conditions in distant dusty, star-forming galaxies, due to the lensing magnification, which can lead to spatial resolutions of ~0.01" in the source plane.
  • We present data products from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). CFHTLenS is based on the Wide component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). It encompasses 154 deg^2 of deep, optical, high-quality, sub-arcsecond imaging data in the five optical filters u^*g'r'i'z'. The article presents our data processing of the complete CFHTLenS data set. We were able to obtain a data set with very good image quality and high-quality astrometric and photometric calibration. Our external astrometric accuracy is between 60-70 mas with respect to SDSS data and the internal alignment in all filters is around 30 mas. Our average photometric calibration shows a dispersion on the order of 0.01 to 0.03 mag for g'r'i'z' and about 0.04 mag for u^* with respect to SDSS sources down to i <= 21. In the spirit of the CFHTLS all our data products are released to the astronomical community via the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre. We give a description and how-to manuals of the public products which include image pixel data, source catalogues with photometric redshift estimates and all relevant quantities to perform weak lensing studies.
  • The radio-quiet quasar BR1202-0725 (z=4.695) is a remarkable source with a bright Northwest (NW) companion detected at submm and radio wavelengths but invisible in the optical. In the absence of amplification by gravitational lensing, BR1202-0725 would be the most luminous binary CO and FIR source in the Universe. In this paper, we report observations with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer of BR1202-0725 in the redshifted emission of the CO(5-4) and (7-6) lines, the [C I](3P2-3P1) line, a high angular resolution (0.3 x 0.8 arcsec) 1.3 mm map of the rest-frame, far-IR dust continuum, and a search for the CO(11-10) line. We compare these results with recent ALMA data in the [C II] line. Both the quasar host galaxy and its NW companion are spatially resolved in the molecular line emission and the dust continuum. The CO profile of the NW companion is very broad with a full width at half maximum of 1000 +/- 130 km/s, compared to 360 +/- 40 km/s for the quasar host galaxy to the Southeast (SE). The difference in linewidths and center velocities, and the absence of any lens candidate or arc-like structure in the field, at any wavelength, show that the obscured NW galaxy and the SE quasar host galaxy cannot be lensed images of the same object. Instead, we find morphological and kinematic evidence for sub-structures in both the NW and SE sources. We interpret these results as strong indications that the BR1202-0725 complex is a group of young, interacting, and highly active starburst galaxies.
  • We present high-resolution maps of stars, dust, and molecular gas in a strongly lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) at z = 3.259. HATLAS12--00 is selected from the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) as a strong lens candidate mainly based on its unusually high 500um flux density (~300 mJy). It is the only high-redshift Planck detection in the 130 deg^2 H-ATLAS Phase 1 area. Keck Adaptive Optics images reveal a quadruply imaged galaxy in the K-band while the Submillimeter Array and the Extended Very Large Array show doubly imaged 880um and CO(1-0) sources, indicating differentiated distributions of the various components in the galaxy. In the source plane, the stars reside in three major kpc-scale clumps extended over ~1.6 kpc, the dust in a compact (~1 kpc) region ~3 kpc north of the stars, and the cold molecular gas in an extended (~7 kpc) disk ~5 kpc northeast of the stars. The emission from the stars, dust, and gas are magnified by ~17, 8, and 7 times, respectively, by four lensing galaxies at z ~ 1. Intrinsically, the lensed galaxy is a warm (T_dust ~ 40-65 K), hyper-luminous (L_IR ~ 1.7e13 Lsun; SFR ~ 2000 Msun/yr), gas-rich (M_gas/M_baryon ~ 70%), young (M_stellar/SFR ~ 20 Myr), and short-lived (M_gas/SFR ~ 40 Myr) starburst, without a significant active galactic nucleus. With physical properties similar to unlensed z > 2 SMGs, HATLAS12--00 offers a detailed view of a typical SMG through a powerful cosmic microscope.