• Context. The mass loss from massive stars is not understood well. Eta Car is a unique object for studying the massive stellar wind during the LBV phase. It is also an eccentric binary with a period of 5.54 yr. The nature of both stars is uncertain, although we know from X-ray studies that there is a wind-wind collision whose properties change with orbital phase. Methods. Observations of Eta Car were carried out with the ESO VLTI and the AMBER instrument between approximately five and seven months before the August 2014 periastron passage. Velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images were reconstructed from the spectrally dispersed interferograms. Interferometric studies can provide information on the binary orbit, the primary wind, and the wind collision. Results. We present velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images reconstructed in more than 100 different spectral channels distributed across the Br Gamma 2.166 micrometer emission line. The intensity distribution of the images strongly depends on wavelength. At wavelengths corresponding to radial velocities of approximately -140 to -376 km/s measured relative to line center, the intensity distribution has a fan-shaped structure. At the velocity of -277 km/s, the position angle of the symmetry axis of the fan is ~ 126 degree. The fan-shaped structure extends approximately 8.0 mas (~ 18.8 au) to the southeast and 5.8 mas (~ 13.6 au) to the northwest, measured along the symmetry axis at the 16% intensity contour. The shape of the intensity distributions suggests that the obtained images are the first direct images of the innermost wind-wind collision zone. Therefore, the observations provide velocity-dependent image structures that can be used to test three-dimensional hydrodynamical, radiative transfer models of the massive interacting winds of Eta Car.
  • Our long term aim is to derive model-independent stellar masses and distances for long period massive binaries by combining apparent astrometric orbit with double-lined radial velocity amplitudes (SB2). We follow-up ten O+O binaries with AMBER, PIONIER and GRAVITY at the VLTI. Here, we report about 130 astrometric observations over the last 7 years. We combine this dataset with distance estimates to compute the total mass of the systems. We also compute preliminary individual component masses for the five systems with available SB2 radial velocities. Nine over the ten binaries have their three dimensional orbit well constrained. Four of them are known colliding wind, non-thermal radio emitters, and thus constitute valuable targets for future high angular resolution radio imaging. Two binaries break the correlation between period and eccentricity tentatively observed in previous studies. It suggests either that massive star formation produce a wide range of systems, or that several binary formation mechanisms are at play. Finally, we found that the use of existing SB2 radial velocity amplitudes can lead to unrealistic masses and distances. If not understood, the biases in radial velocity amplitudes will represent an intrinsic limitation for estimating dynamical masses from SB2+interferometry or SB2+Gaia. Nevertheless, our results can be combined with future Gaia astrometry to measure the dynamical masses and distances of the individual components with an accuracy of 5 to 15\%, completely independently of the radial velocities.
  • In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a sample of spectroscopic binaries is being observed since 2010 with the Sophie spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 % when combined with Gaia astrometric measurements. In order to validate the masses derived from Gaia, interferometric observations are obtained for three SB2s in our sample with F-K components: HIP 14157, HIP 20601 and HIP 117186. The masses of the six stellar components are derived. Due to its edge-on orientation, HIP 14157 is probably an eclipsing binary. We note that almost all the derived masses are a few percent larger than the expectations from the standard spectral-type-mass calibration and mass-luminosity relation. Our calculation also leads to accurate parallaxes for the three binaries, and the Hipparcos parallaxes are confirmed.
  • We analyse and report in detail new near-infrared (1.45 - 2.45 microns) observations of the Dusty S-cluster Object (DSO/G2) during its approach to the black hole at the center of the Galaxy that were carried out with ESO VLT/SINFONI between February and September 2014. Before May 2014 we detect spatially compact Br-gamma and Pa-alpha line emission from the DSO at about 40mas east of SgrA*. The velocity of the source, measured from the red-shifted emission, is 2700+-60 km/s. No blue-shifted emission above the noise level is detected at the position of SgrA* or upstream the presumed orbit. After May we find spatially compact Br-gamma blue-shifted line emission from the DSO at about 30mas west of SgrA* at a velocity of -3320+-60 km/s and no indication for significant red-shifted emission. We do not detect any significant extension of velocity gradient across the source. We find a Br-gamma-line full width at half maximum of 50+-10 Angstroem before and 15+-10 Angstroem after the peribothron transit, i.e. no significant line broadening with respect to last year is observed. Br-gamma line maps show that the bulk of the line emission originates from a region of less than 20mas diameter. This is consistent with a very compact source on an elliptical orbit with a peribothron time passage in 2014.39+-0.14. For the moment, the flaring activity of the black hole in the near-infrared regime has not shown any statistically significant increment. Increased accretion activity of SgrA* may still be upcoming. We discuss details of a source model according to which the DSO is rather a young accreting star than a coreless gas and dust cloud.
  • The optically invisible infrared-source NGC 2264 IRS 1 is thought to be a massive young stellar object (~10 Msun). Although strong infrared excess clearly shows that the central object is surrounded by large amounts of circumstellar material, no information about the spatial distribution of this circumstellar material has been available until now. We used the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer to perform long-baseline interferometric observations of NGC 2264 IRS 1 in the mid-infrared regime. Our observations resolve the circumstellar material around NGC 2264 IRS 1, provide the first direct measurement of the angular size of the mid-infrared emission, and yield direct constraints on the spatial distribution of the dust. We use different approaches (a geometrical model, a temperature-gradient model, and radiative transfer models) to jointly model the observed interferometric visibilities and the spectral energy distribution. The derived visibility values between ~0.02 and ~0.3 show that the mid-infrared emission is clearly resolved. The characteristic size of the MIR-emission region is ~30-60 AU; this value is typical for other YSOs with similar or somewhat lower luminosities. A comparison of the sizes for the two position angles shows a significant elongation of the dust distribution. Simple spherical envelope models are therefore inconsistent with the data. The radiative transfer modeling of our data suggests that we observe a geometrically thin and optically thick circumstellar disk with a mass of about 0.1 Msun. Our modeling indicates that NGC 2264 IRS 1 is surrounded by a flat circumstellar disk that has properties similar to disks typically found around lower-mass young stellar objects. This result supports the assumption that massive young stellar objects form via accretion from circumstellar disks.