• We describe the framework and strategy of the \^G infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although Gaia will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a "zeroth order" null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can extend our methodology to smaller waste heat luminosities, and potentially entirely rule out (or detect) both Kardashev Type III civilizations and new physics that allows for unlimited "free" energy generation.
  • We place new limits on potential T- and P- violating monopole-dipole interactions between unpolarized nucleons and neutrons using dual species magnetic resonance in polarzed Xe gas. Free-induction decay transients with relaxation times ~20 s allow high precision measurements of the NMR frequencies, whose ratios cancel magnetic fluctuations. The new limits on the product gsgp improve on previous laboratory work by 2 orders of magnitude.
  • We report the discovery of a six-month-long mid-infrared transient, SDWFS-MT-1 (aka SN 2007va), in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Bootes field. The transient, located in a z=0.19 low luminosity (M_[4.5]~-18.6 mag, L/L_MilkyWay~0.01) metal-poor (12+log(O/H)~7.8) irregular galaxy, peaked at a mid-infrared absolute magnitude of M_[4.5]~-24.2 in the 4.5 micron Spitzer/IRAC band and emitted a total energy of at least 10^51 ergs. The optical emission was likely fainter than the mid-infrared, although our constraints on the optical emission are poor because the transient peaked when the source was "behind" the Sun. The Spitzer data are consistent with emission by a modified black body with a temperature of ~1350 K. We rule out a number of scenarios for the origin of the transient such as a Galactic star, AGN activity, GRB, tidal disruption of a star by a black hole and gravitational lensing. The most plausible scenario is a supernova exploding inside a massive, optically thick circumstellar medium, composed of multiple shells of previously ejected material. If the proposed scenario is correct, then a significant fraction (~10%) of the most luminous supernova may be self-enshrouded by dust not only before but also after the supernova occurs. The spectral energy distribution of the progenitor of such a supernova would be a slightly cooler version of eta Carina, peaking at 20-30 microns.
  • The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of ten square degrees in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Cycle four Spitzer Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit -- for the first time -- the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z~3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS datasets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z~1.5. This paper explains the SDWFS observing strategy and data processing, presents the SDWFS mosaics and source catalogs, and discusses some early scientific findings. The publicly-released, full-depth catalogs contain 6.78, 5.23, 1.20, and 0.96 x 10e5 distinct sources detected to the average 5-sigma, 4" diameter, aperture-corrected limits of 19.77, 18.83, 16.50, and 15.82 Vega mag at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micron, respectively. The SDWFS number counts and color-color distribution are consistent with other, earlier Spitzer surveys. At the 6 min integration time of the SDWFS IRAC imaging, more than 50% of isolated FIRST radio sources and more than 80% of on-axis XBootes sources are detected out to 8.0 micron. Finally, we present the four highest proper motion IRAC-selected sources identified from the multi-epoch imaging, two of which are likely field brown dwarfs of mid-T spectral class.
  • We present spectroscopy and photometry of the He-rich supernova (SN) 2008ax. The early-time spectra show prominent P-Cygni H lines, which decrease with time and disappear completely about two months after the explosion. In the same period He I lines become the most prominent spectral features. SN 2008ax displays the ordinary spectral evolution of a type IIb supernova. A stringent pre-discovery limit constrains the time of the shock breakout of SN 2008ax to within only a few hours. Its light curve, which peaks in the B band about 20 days after the explosion, strongly resembles that of other He-rich core-collapse supernovae. The observed evolution of SN 2008ax is consistent with the explosion of a young Wolf-Rayet (of WNL type) star, which had retained a thin, low-mass shell of its original H envelope. The overall characteristics of SN 2008ax are reminiscent of those of SN 1993J, except for a likely smaller H mass. This may account for the findings that the progenitor of SN 2008ax was a WNL star and not a K supergiant as in the case of SN 1993J, that a prominent early-time peak is missing in the light curve of SN 2008ax, and that Halpha is observed at higher velocities in SN 2008ax than in SN 1993J.