• Inter-layer synchronization is a dynamical state occurring in multi-layer networks composed of identical nodes. The state corresponds to have all layers synchronized, with nodes in each layer which do not necessarily evolve in unison. So far, the study of such a solution has been restricted to the case in which all layers had an identical connectivity structure. When layers are not identical, the inter-layer synchronous state is no longer a stable solution of the system. Nevertheless, when layers differ in just a few links, an approximate treatment is still feasible, and allows one to gather information on whether and how the system may wander around an inter-layer synchronous configuration. We report the details of an approximate analytical treatment for a two-layer multiplex, which results in the introduction of an extra inertial term accounting for structural differences. Numerical validation of the predictions highlights the usefulness of our approach, especially for small or moderate topological differences in the intra-layer coupling. Moreover, we identify a non-trivial relationship between the betweenness centrality of the missing links and the intra-layer coupling strength. Finally, by the use of two multiplexed identical layers of electronic circuits in a chaotic regime, we study the loss of inter-layer synchronization as a function of the betweenness centrality of the removed links.
  • Maximally synchronizable networks (MSNs) are acyclic directed networks that maximize synchronizability. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of transforming networks of coupled oscillators into their corresponding MSNs. By tuning the weights of any given network so as to reach the lowest possible eigenratio $\lambda_N/\lambda_2$, the synchronized state is guaranteed to be maintained across the longest possible range of coupling strengths. We check the robustness of the resulting MSNs with an experimental implementation of a network of nonlinear electronic oscillators and study the propagation of the synchronization errors through the network. Importantly, a method to study the effects of topological uncertainties on the synchronizability is proposed and explored both theoretically and experimentally.
  • Inter-layer synchronization is a distinctive process of multiplex networks whereby each node in a given layer undergoes a synchronous evolution with all its replicas in other layers, irrespective of whether or not it is synchronized with the other units of the same layer. We analytically derive the necessary conditions for the existence and stability of inter-layer synchronization, and verify numerically the analytical predictions in several cases where such a state emerges. We inspect the impact of the layer topology on the robustness of such a state against a progressive de-multiplexing of the network. Finally, we provide experimental evidence by means of multiplexes of nonlinear electronic circuits, showing the stability of the synchronized manifold despite the intrinsic noise and parameter mismatch in the experiment.
  • Synchronization processes in populations of identical networked oscillators are in the focus of intense studies in physical, biological, technological and social systems. Here we analyze the stability of the synchronization of a network of oscillators coupled through different variables. Under the assumption of an equal topology of connections for all variables, the master stability function formalism allows assessing and quantifying the stability properties of the synchronization manifold when the coupling is transferred from one variable to another. We report on the existence of an optimal coupling transference that maximizes the stability of the synchronous state in a network of R\"ossler-like oscillators. Finally, we design an experimental implementation (using nonlinear electronic circuits) which grounds the robustness of the theoretical predictions against parameter mismatches, as well as against intrinsic noise of the system.
  • We propose a methodology to analyze synchronization in an ensemble of diffusively coupled multistable systems. First, we study how two bidirectionally coupled multistable oscillators synchronize and demonstrate the high complexity of the basins of attraction of coexisting synchronous states. Then, we propose the use of the Master Stability Function (MSF) for multistable systems to describe synchronizability, even during intermittent behaviour, of a network of multistable oscillators, regardless of both the number of coupled oscillators and the interaction structure. In particular, we show that a network of multistable elements is synchronizable for a given range of topology spectra and coupling strengths, irrespective of specific attractor dynamics to which different oscillators are locked, and even in the presence of intermittency. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the MSF approach with a network of multistable electronic circuits.
  • In this Letter we identify the general rules that determine the synchronization properties of interconnected networks. We study analytically, numerically and experimentally how the degree of the nodes through which two networks are connected influences the ability of the whole system to synchronize. We show that connecting the high-degree (low-degree) nodes of each network turns out to be the most (least) effective strategy to achieve synchronization. We find the functional relation between synchronizability and size for a given network-of-networks, and report the existence of the optimal connector link weights for the different interconnection strategies. Finally, we perform an electronic experiment with two coupled star networks and conclude that the analytical results are indeed valid in the presence of noise and parameter mismatches.
  • We report on spin transport along double-helical molecular systems by considering various contact configurations and asymmetries between the two helical strands in the regime of completely coherent charge transport. Our results reveal that no spin polarization appears in two-terminal molecular devices when coupled to one-dimensional electrodes. The same holds in the case of finite-width electrodes if there is a \emph{bottleneck} of one single site in the system electrode--molecule--electrode. Then, additional dephasing is necessary to induce spin-filtering effects. In contrast, nonzero spin polarization is found in molecular devices with multiple terminals or with two finite-width electrodes, each of them connected to more than one site of the molecule. Then, the magnitude of spin polarization can be enhanced by increasing the asymmetry between the two strands. We point out that the spin-filtering effects could emerge in double-helical molecular devices at low temperature without dephasing by a proper choice of the electrode number and the connection between the molecule and the electrodes.
  • This whitepaper describes the status of the DAEdALUS program for development of high power cyclotrons as of the time of the final meeting of the Division of Particles and Fields 2013 Community Study ("Snowmass"). We report several new results, including a measurement capability between 4 and 12 degrees on the CP violating parameter in the neutrino sector. Past results, including the capability of the IsoDAR high Dm^2 antielectron neutrino disappearance search, are reviewed. A discussion of the R&D successes, including construction of a beamline teststand, and future plans are provided. This text incorporates short whitepapers written for subgroups in the Intensity Frontier and Frontier Capabilities Working Groups that are available on the Snowmass website.
  • Debris discs are a consequence of the planet formation process and constitute the fingerprints of planetesimal systems. Their solar system's counterparts are the asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. The DUNES survey aims at detecting extra-solar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt around solar-type stars, putting in this way the solar system into context. The survey allows us to address some questions related to the prevalence and properties of planetesimal systems. We used {\it Herschel}/PACS to observe a sample of nearby FGK stars. Data at 100 and 160 $\mu$m were obtained, complemented in some cases with observations at 70 $\mu$m, and at 250, 350 and 500 $\mu$m using SPIRE. The observing strategy was to integrate as deep as possible at 100 $\mu$m to detect the stellar photosphere. Debris discs have been detected at a fractional luminosity level down to several times that of the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. The incidence rate of discs around the DUNES stars is increased from a rate of $\sim$ 12.1% $\pm$ 5% before \emph{Herschel} to $\sim$ 20.2% $\pm$ 2%. A significant fraction ($\sim$ 52%) of the discs are resolved, which represents an enormous step ahead from the previously known resolved discs. Some stars are associated with faint far-IR excesses attributed to a new class of cold discs. Although it cannot be excluded that these excesses are produced by coincidental alignment of background galaxies, statistical arguments suggest that at least some of them are true debris discs. Some discs display peculiar SEDs with spectral indexes in the 70-160$\mu$m range steeper than the Rayleigh-Jeans one. An analysis of the debris disc parameters suggests that a decrease might exist of the mean black body radius from the F-type to the K-type stars. In addition, a weak trend is suggested for a correlation of disc sizes and an anticorrelation of disc temperatures with the stellar age.
  • Charge migration is a ubiquitous phenomenon with profound implications throughout many areas of chemistry, physics, biology and materials science. The long-term vision of designing functional materials with tailored molecular scale properties has triggered an increasing quest to identify prototypical systems where truly molecular conduction pathways play a fundamental role. Such pathways can be formed due to the molecular organization of various organic materials and are widely used to discuss electronic properties at the nanometer scale. Here, we present a computational methodology to study charge propagation in organic molecular stacks at nano and sub-nanoscales and exploit this methodology to demonstrate that moving charge carriers strongly affect the values of the physical quantities controlling their motion. The approach is also expected to find broad application in the field of charge migration in soft matter systems.
  • Highly spin selective transport of electrons through a helically shaped electrostatic potential is demonstrated in the frame of a minimal model approach. The effect is significant even in the case of weak spin-orbit coupling. Two main factors determine the selectivity, an unconventional Rashba- like spin-orbit interaction, reflecting the helical symmetry of the system, and a weakly dispersive electronic band of the helical system. The weak electronic coupling, associated with the small dispersion, leads to a low mobility of the charges in the system and allows even weak spin-orbit interactions to be effective. The results are expected to be generic for chiral molecular systems displaying low spin-orbit coupling and low conductivity.
  • In this work we investigate heat conduction along a ladder-model conformed by two coupled one dimensional lattices with different anharmonicity. We study how the interchain coupling modifies the thermal properties of the isolated systems. For a large enough coupling strength, we demonstrate that a harmonic lattice interacting with an anharmonic one is able to support a linear thermal gradient when it is connected to two heat reservoirs at different temperatures. We estimate this critical coupling by applying the self-consistent phonon theory (SCPT) to the anharmonic counterpart. By exchanging the heat baths connections between the harmonic and the anharmonic chains, our results show that the coupled system reveals as a thermal rectifier.
  • We present the first far-IR observations of the solar-type stars delta Pav, HR 8501, 51 Peg and zeta^2 Ret, taken within the context of the DUNES Herschel Open Time Key Programme (OTKP). This project uses the PACS and SPIRE instruments with the objective of studying infrared excesses due to exo-Kuiper belts around nearby solar-type stars. The observed 100 um fluxes from delta Pav, HR 8501, and 51 Peg agree with the predicted photospheric fluxes, excluding debris disks brighter than Ldust/Lstar ~ 5 x 10^-7 (1 sigma level) around those stars. A flattened, disk-like structure with a semi-major axis of ~ 100 AU in size is detected around zeta^2 Ret. The resolved structure suggests the presence of an eccentric dust ring, which we interpret as an exo-Kuiper belt with Ldust/Lstar ~ 10^-5.
  • Charge transport through a short DNA oligomer (Dickerson dodecamer) in presence of structural fluctuations is investigated using a hybrid computational methodology based on a combination of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations with a model Hamiltonian approach. Based on a fragment orbital description, the DNA electronic structure can be coarse-grained in a very efficient way. The influence of dynamical fluctuations arising either from the solvent fluctuations or from base-pair vibrational modes can be taken into account in a straightforward way through time series of the effective DNA electronic parameters, evaluated at snapshots along the MD trajectory. We show that charge transport can be promoted through the coupling to solvent fluctuations, which gate the onsite energies along the DNA wire.
  • We propose a possible route to achieve high thermoelectric efficiency in molecular junctions by combining a local chemical tuning of the molecular electronic states with the use of semiconducting electrodes. The former allows to control the position of the HOMO transmission resonance with respect to the Fermi energy while the latter fulfills a twofold purpose: the suppression of electron-like contributions to the thermopower and the cut-off of the HOMO transmission tails into the semiconductor band gap. As a result a large thermopower can be obtained. Our results strongly suggest that large figures of merit in such molecular junctions can be achieved.
  • * Aims. We describe here the main functionalities of the LAEX (Laboratorio de Astrofisica Estelar y Exoplanetas/Laboratory for Stellar Astrophysics and Exoplanets) and NASA portals for CoRoT Public Data. The CoRoT archive at LAEX was opened to the community in January 2009 and is managed in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory. NStED (NASA Star and Exoplanet Database) serves as the CoRoT portal for the US astronomical community. NStED is a general purpose stellar and exoplanet archive with the aim of providing support for NASA planet finding and characterisation goals, and the planning and support of NASA and other space missions. CoRoT data at LAEX and NStED can be accessed at http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/corotfa/ and http://nsted.ipac.caltech.edu,respectively. * Methods. Based on considerable experience with astronomical archives, the aforementioned archives are designed with the aim of delivering science-quality data in a simple and efficient way. * Results. LAEX and NStED not only provide access to CoRoT Public Data but furthermore serve a variety of observed and calculated astrophysical data. In particular, NStED provides scientifically validated information on stellar and planetary data related to the search for and characterization of extrasolar planets, and LAEX makes any information from Virtual Observatory services available to the astronomical community.
  • We present a hybrid method based on a combination of quantum/classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a mod el Hamiltonian approach to describe charge transport through bio-molecular wires with variable lengths in presence o f a solvent. The core of our approach consists in a mapping of the bio-molecular electronic structure, as obtained f rom density-functional based tight-binding calculations of molecular structures along MD trajectories, onto a low di mensional model Hamiltonian including the coupling to a dissipative bosonic environment. The latter encodes fluctuat ion effects arising from the solvent and from the molecular conformational dynamics. We apply this approach to the c ase of pG-pC and pA-pT DNA oligomers as paradigmatic cases and show that the DNA conformational fluctuations are essential in determining and supporting charge transport.
  • The main goal of this paper is to prove that accreting very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs can be identified in IPHAS, a Halpha emission survey of the northern Milky Way.Full exploitation of the IPHAS database and a future extension of it in the southern hemisphere will be useful to identify very low-mass accreting objects near and far well-known star forming regions. We have used Virtual Observatory tools to cross-match the IPHAS catalogue with the 2MASS catalogue. We defined photometric criteria to identify Halpha emission sources with near-infrared colours similar to known young very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. 4000 candidates were identified that met our criteria over an area of 1600 square degrees. We present low-resolution optical spectra of 113 candidates. Spectral types have been derived for the 33 candidates that have spectroscopically confirmed Halpha emission, negligible reddening and M spectral class. We have also measured Halpha emission and investigated the NaI doublet (818.3 nm, 819.5 nm) in these 33 objects. We confirm that 33 IPHAS candidates have strong Halpha indicative of disk accretion for their spectral type. 23 of them have spectral class M4 or later, of which 10 have classes in the range M5.5-M7.0 and thus could be very young brown dwarfs. Also many objects have weak NaI doublet, an indication of low surface gravity.We conclude that IPHAS provides a very valuable database to identify accreting very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, and that Virtual Observatory tools provide an efficient method for identifying these objects over large areas of the sky. Based on our success rate of 23 Halpha emission objects with spectral type in the range M4-M7 out of 113 candidates with spectroscopic follow-up, we estimate that there could be hundreds of such objects in the full IPHAS survey.
  • The physical properties of almost any kind of astronomical object can be derived by fitting synthetic spectra or photometry extracted from theoretical models to observational data. We want to develop an automatic procedure to perform this kind of fittings to a relatively large sample of members of a stellar association and apply this methodology to the case of Collinder 69. We combine the multiwavelength data of our sources and follow a work-flow to derive the physical parameters of the sources. The key step of the work-flow is performed by a new VO-tool, VOSA. All the steps in this process are done in a VO environment. We present this new tool, and provide physical parameters such as T$_{\rm eff}$, gravity, luminosity, etc. for $\sim$170 candidate members to Collinder 69, and an upper-limit for the age of this stellar association. This kind of studies of star forming regions, clusters, etc. produces a huge amount of data, very tedious to analyse using the traditional methodology. Thus, they are excellent examples where to apply the VO capabilities.
  • The theoretical investigation of charge (and spin) transport at nanometer length scales requires the use of advanced and powerful techniques able to deal with the dynamical properties of the relevant physical systems, to explicitly include out-of-equilibrium situations typical for electrical/heat transport as well as to take into account interaction effects in a systematic way. Equilibrium Green function techniques and their extension to non-equilibrium situations via the Keldysh formalism build one of the pillars of current state-of-the-art approaches to quantum transport which have been implemented in both model Hamiltonian formulations and first-principle methodologies. We offer a tutorial overview of the applications of Green functions to deal with some fundamental aspects of charge transport at the nanoscale, mainly focusing on applications to model Hamiltonian formulations.
  • The physical properties of almost any kind of astronomical object can be derived by fitting synthetic spectra or photometry extracted from theoretical models to observational data. This process usually involves working with multiwavelength data, which is one of the cornerstones of the VO philosophy. From this kind of studies, when combining with theoretical isochrones one can even estimate ages. We present here the results obtained from a code designed to perform chi^2 tests to both spectroscopic models (or the associated synthetic photometry) and combinations of blackbodies (including modified blackbodies). Some steps in this process can already be done in a VO environment, and the rest are in the process of development. We must note that this kind of studies in star forming regions, clusters, etc. produce a huge amount of data, very tedious to analyze using the traditional methodology. This make them excellent examples where to apply the VO capabilities.
  • We investigate quantum transport characteristics of a ladder model, which effectively mimics the topology of a double-stranded DNA molecule. We consider the interaction of tunneling charges with a selected internal vibrational degree of freedom and discuss its influence on the structure of the current-voltage characteristics. Further, molecule-electrode contact effects are shown to dramatically affect the orders of magnitude of the current. Recent electrical transport measurements on suspended DNA oligomers with a complex base-pair sequence, revealing strikingly high currents, are also presented and used as a reference point for the theoretical modeling. A semi-quantitative description of the measured I-V curves is achieved, suggesting that the coupling to vibrational excitations plays an important role in DNA conduction.
  • The rapid progress in the field of molecular electronics has led to an increasing interest on DNA oligomers as possible components of electronic circuits at the nanoscale. For this, however, an understanding of charge transfer and transport mechanisms in this molecule is required. Experiments show that a large number of factors may influence the electronic properties of DNA. Though full first principle approaches are the ideal tool for a theoretical characterization of the structural and electronic properties of DNA, the structural complexity of this molecule make these methods of limited use. Consequently, model Hamiltonian approaches, which filter out single factors influencing charge propagation in the double helix are highly valuable. In this chapter, we give a review of different DNA models which are thought to capture the influence of some of these factors. We will specifically focus on static and dynamic disorder.
  • Measurements of electron transfer rates as well as of charge transport characteristics in DNA produced a number of seemingly contradictory results, ranging from insulating behaviour to the suggestion that DNA is an efficient medium for charge transport. Among other factors, environmental effects appear to play a crucial role in determining the effectivity of charge propagation along the double helix. This chapter gives an overview over charge transfer theories and their implication for addressing the interaction of a molecular conductor with a dissipative environment. Further, we focus on possible applications of these approaches for charge transport through DNA-based molecular wires.
  • We investigate the influence of a dissipative environment which effectively comprises the effects of counterions and hydration shells, on the transport properties of short \DNA wires. Their electronic structure is captured by a tight-binding model which is embedded in a bath consisting of a collection of harmonic oscillators. Without coupling to the bath a temperature independent gap opens in the electronic spectrum. Upon allowing for electron-bath interaction the gap becomes temperature dependent. It increases with temperature in the weak-coupling limit to the bath degrees of freedom. In the strong-coupling regime a bath-induced {\it pseudo-gap} is formed. As a result, a crossover from tunneling to activated behavior in the low-voltage region of the $I$-$V$ characteristics is observed with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of the transmission near the Fermi energy, $t(E_{\rm F})$, manifests an Arrhenius-like behavior in agreement with recent transport experiments. Moreover, $t(E_{\rm F})$ shows a weak exponential dependence on the wire length, typical of strong incoherent transport. Disorder effects smear the electronic bands, but do not appreciably affect the pseudo-gap formation.