• In eikonal and quenched approximation, it is argued that the strong coupling fermionic QCD Green's functions and related amplitudes depart from a sole dependence on the SUc(3) quadratic Casimir operator, C2f, evaluated over the fundamental gauge group representation. Noticed in non-relativistic Quark Models and in a non-perturbative generalization of the Schwinger mechanism, an additional dependence on the cubic Casimir operator shows up, in contradistinction with perturbation theory and other non-perturbative approaches. However, it accounts for the full algebraic content of the rank-2 Lie algebra of SUc(3). Though numerically sub-leading effects, cubic Casimir dependences, here and elsewhere, appear to be a signature of the non-perturbative fermonic sector of QCD.
  • The VLTI instrument GRAVITY will provide very powerful astrometry by combining the light from four telescopes for two objects simultaneously. It will measure the angular separation between the two astronomical objects to a precision of 10 microarcseconds. This corresponds to a differential optical path difference (dOPD) between the targets of few nanometers and the paths within the interferometer have to be maintained stable to that level. For this purpose, the novel metrology system of GRAVITY will monitor the internal dOPDs by means of phase-shifting interferometry. We present the four-step phase-shifting concept of the metrology with emphasis on the method used for calibrating the phase shifts. The latter is based on a phase-step insensitive algorithm which unambiguously extracts phases in contrast to other methods that are strongly limited by non-linearities of the phase-shifting device. The main constraint of this algorithm is to introduce a robust ellipse fitting routine. Via this approach we are able to measure phase shifts in the laboratory with a typical accuracy of lambda/2000 or 1 nanometer of the metrology wavelength.
  • Using a sample of high-redshift lensed quasars from the CASTLES project with observed-frame ultraviolet or optical and near-infrared spectra, we have searched for possible biases between supermassive black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the CIV, Halpha and Hbeta broad emission lines. Our sample is based upon that of Greene, Peng & Ludwig, expanded with new near-IR spectroscopic observations, consistently analyzed high S/N optical spectra, and consistent continuum luminosity estimates at 5100A. We find that BH mass estimates based on the FWHM of CIV show a systematic offset with respect to those obtained from the line dispersion, sigma_l, of the same emission line, but not with those obtained from the FWHM of Halpha and Hbeta. The magnitude of the offset depends on the treatment of the HeII and FeII emission blended with CIV, but there is little scatter for any fixed measurement prescription. While we otherwise find no systematic offsets between CIV and Balmer line mass estimates, we do find that the residuals between them are strongly correlated with the ratio of the UV and optical continuum luminosities. Removing this dependency reduces the scatter between the UV- and optical-based BH mass estimates by a factor of approximately 2, from roughly 0.35 to 0.18 dex. The dispersion is smallest when comparing the CIV sigma_l mass estimate, after removing the offset from the FWHM estimates, and either Balmer line mass estimate. The correlation with the continuum slope is likely due to a combination of reddening, host contamination and object-dependent SED shapes. When we add additional heterogeneous measurements from the literature, the results are unchanged.
  • GRAVITY is an adaptive optics assisted Beam Combiner for the second generation VLTI instrumentation. The instrument will provide high-precision narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced interferometric imaging in the astronomical K-band for faint objects. We describe the wide range of science that will be tackled with this instrument, highlighting the unique capabilities of the VLTI in combination with GRAVITY. The most prominent goal is to observe highly relativistic motions of matter close to the event horizon of Sgr A*, the massive black hole at center of the Milky Way. We present the preliminary design that fulfils the requirements that follow from the key science drivers: It includes an integrated optics, 4-telescope, dual feed beam combiner operated in a cryogenic vessel; near-infrared wavefrontsensing adaptive optics; fringe-tracking on secondary sources within the field of view of the VLTI and a novel metrology concept. Simulations show that 10 {\mu}as astrometry within few minutes is feasible for a source with a magnitude of mK = 15 like Sgr A*, given the availability of suitable phase reference sources (mK = 10). Using the same setup, imaging of mK = 18 stellar sources in the interferometric field of view is possible, assuming a full night of observations and the corresponding UV coverage of the VLTI.
  • We present the second-generation VLTI instrument GRAVITY, which currently is in the preliminary design phase. GRAVITY is specifically designed to observe highly relativistic motions of matter close to the event horizon of Sgr A*, the massive black hole at center of the Milky Way. We have identified the key design features needed to achieve this goal and present the resulting instrument concept. It includes an integrated optics, 4-telescope, dual feed beam combiner operated in a cryogenic vessel; near infrared wavefront sensing adaptive optics; fringe tracking on secondary sources within the field of view of the VLTI and a novel metrology concept. Simulations show that the planned design matches the scientific needs; in particular that 10 microarcsecond astrometry is feasible for a source with a magnitude of K=15 like Sgr A*, given the availability of suitable phase reference sources.
  • We compute the two-loop corrections to the thermodynamical pressure of an SU(2) Yang-Mills theory being in its electric phase. Our results prove that the one-loop evolution of the effective gauge coupling constant is reliable for any practical purpose. We thus establish the validity of the picture of almost noninteracting thermal quasiparticles in the electric phase. Implications of our results for the explanation of the large-angle anomaly in the power spectrum of temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background are discussed.
  • We present possible realizations of gauge inflation arising from a 5D ${\cal N}=1$ supersymmetric U(1) model, where the extra dimension is compactified on a circle. A one-loop inflaton effective 4D potential is generated, with the inflaton being a 'Wilson-line field'. It relies on a SUSY breaking. We first consider SUSY breaking to occur spontaneously within a 'no-scale' model by a non zero $F$-term of the radion superfield which transmits SUSY breaking into the 'visible' sector. As an alternative, we study $D$-term SUSY breaking originating directly from the 5D gauge supermultiplet. Together with the usual KK resummation method, we present a calculation with the world-line formalism. The latter allows one to get the resulting effective potential directly as a sum over all winding modes. For both presented scenarios, the generated effective potentials have suitable forms for realizing successful inflation, i.e. are flat enough and give the needed number of ${\rm e}$-foldings. In addition, there is a natural way to get strongly suppressed values for the potentials, which then could be associated with dark energy/quintessence.
  • We analyze deep near-IR adaptive optics imaging as well as new proper motion data of the nuclear star cluster of the Milky Way. The surface density distribution of faint stars peaks within 0.2" of the black hole candidate SgrA*. The radial density distribution of this stellar 'cusp' follows a power law of exponent 1.3-1.4. The K-band luminosity function of the overall nuclear stellar cluster (within 9" of SgrA*) resembles that of the large scale, Galactic bulge, but shows an excess of stars at K<14. We find that most of the massive early type stars at distances 1-10" from SgrA* are located in two rotating and geometrically thin disks. These disks are inclined at large angles and counter-rotate with respect to each other. Their stellar content is essentially the same, indicating that they formed at the same time. The star closest to SgrA* in 2002, S2, exhibits a 3.8 micron excess. We propose that the mid-IR emission either comes from the accretion flow around the black hole itself, or from dust in the accretion flow that is heated by the ultra-violet emission of S2.
  • We report on the first results obtained using adaptive optics measurements of the Galactic Centre done with NAOS/CONICA.
  • A prescription for the short-distance expansion of Euclidean current correlators based on a delocalized modification of the multipole expansion of perturbative short-distance coefficient functions is proposed that appreciates the presence of nonlocal physics in the nonperturbative QCD vacuum. This expansion converges better than the local Wilson OPE, which is recovered in the limit of infinite resolution. As a consequence, the usual local condensates in the Wilson OPE become condensates that depend on a resolution parameter and that can be expressed as an infinite series of local condensates with increasing dimension. In a calculation of the nonperturbative correction to the ground state energy level of heavy quarkonia the improved convergence properties of the delocalized expansion are demonstrated. Phenomenological evidence is gathered that the gluon condensate, often being the leading nonperturbative parameter of the Wilson OPE, is indeed a function of resolution. The delocalized expansion is applied to derive a leading order scaling relation for $f_D/f_B$ in the heavy mass expansion.
  • Measurements of stellar velocities and variable X-ray emission near the centre of the Milky Way have provided the strongest evidence so far that the dark mass concentrations seen in many galactic nuclei are likely supermassive black holes, but have not yet excluded several alternative configurations. Here we report ten years of high resolution astrometric imaging that allow us to trace two thirds of the orbit of the star currently closest to the compact radio source and massive black hole candidate SgrA*. In particular, we have observed both peri- and apocentre passages. Our observations show that the star is on a bound, highly elliptical Keplerian orbit around SgrA*, with an orbital period of 15.2 years and a peri-centre distance of only 17 light hours. The orbital elements require an enclosed point mass of 3.7+-1.5x10^6 solar masses. The data exclude with high confidence that the central dark mass consists of a cluster of astrophysical objects or massive, degenerate fermions, and strongly constrain the central density structure.
  • An updated analysis of vector and axial-vector spectral functions is presented. The resonant contributions to the spectral integrals are shown to be expressible as multiples of 4 pi^2 f_pi^2, encoding the scale of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in QCD. Up to order T^2 this behavior carries over to the case of finite temperature.
  • Generalized Wess-Zumino models which admit topologically non-trivial BPS saturated configurations along one compact, spatial dimension are investigated in various dimensions of space-time. We show that, in a representative model and for sufficiently large circumference, there are BPS configurations along the compact dimension containing an arbitrary number of equidistant, well-separated domain walls. We analyze the spectrum of the bosonic and fermionic light and massless modes that are localized on these walls. The masses of the light modes are exponentially suppressed by the ratio of the distance between the walls and their width. States that are initially localized on one wall oscillate in time between all the walls. In (2+1) dimensions the ``chirality'' of localized, massless fermions is determined. In the (1+1)-dimensional case we show how the mass of certain classically BPS saturated solitons is lifted above the BPS bound by instanton tunneling.
  • From the hypothesis that at zero temperature the square root of the spectral continuum threshold $s_0$ is linearly related to the QCD scale $\Lambda$ we derive in the chiral limit and for temperatures considerably smaller than $\Lambda$ scaling relations for the vacuum parts of the Gibbs averaged scalar operators contributing to the thermal operator product expansion of the $\rho^0$ current-current correlator. The scaling with $\lambda\equiv \sqrt{s_0(T)/s_0(0)}$, $s_0$ being the $T$-dependent perturbative QCD continuum threshold in the spectral integral, is simple for renormalization group invariant operators, and becomes nontrivial for a set of operators which mix and scale anomalously under a change of the renormalization point. In contrast to previous works on thermal QCD sum rules with this approach the gluon condensate exhibits a sizable $T$-dependence. The $\rho$ -meson mass is found to rise slowly with temperature which coincides with the result found by means of a PCAC and current algebra analysis of the $\rho^0$ correlator.
  • An alternative to introducing and subsequently renormalizing classical parameters in the expression for the vacuum energy of the MIT bag for quarks is proposed in the massless case by appealing to the QCD trace anomaly and scale separation due to asymptotic freedom. The explicit inclusion of gluons implies an unrealistically low separation scale.
  • Integral-field-spectroscopy and multi-object-spectroscopy provide the high multiplex gain required for efficient use of the upcoming generation of extremely large telescopes. We present instrument developments and designs for both concepts, and how these designs can be applied to cryogenic near-infrared instrumentation. Specifically, the fiber-based concept stands out the possibility to expand it to any number of image points, and its modularity predestines it to become the new concept for multi-field-spectroscopy. Which of the three concepts --- integral-field-, multi-object-, or multi-field-spectroscopy --- is best suited for the largest telescopes is discussed considering the size of the objects and their density on the sky.
  • A novel technique based on Schwinger's proper time method is applied to the Casimir problem of the M.I.T. bag model. Calculations of the regularized vacuum energies of massless scalar and Dirac spinor fields confined to a static and spherical cavity are presented in a consistent manner. While our results agree partly with previous calculations based on asymptotic methods, the main advantage of our technique is that the numerical errors are under control. Interpreting the bag constant as a vacuum expectation value, we investigate potential cancellations of boundary divergences between the canonical energy and its bag constant counterpart in the fermionic case. It is found that such cancellations do not occur.
  • Quantum Hadrodynamics in mean field approximation describes the effective nucleon-nucleus potential (about -50 MeV deep) as resulting from a strong repulsive vector (about 400 MeV) and a strong attractive scalar (about -450 MeV) contribution. This scalar-vector Lorentz structure implies a significant lowering of the threshold for $p\bar{p}$ photoproduction on a nucleus by about 850 MeV as compared to the free case since charge conjugation reverses the sign of the vector potential contribution in the equation of motion for the $\bar{p}$ states. It also implies a certain size of the photon induced $p\bar{p}$ pair creation cross section near threshold which is calculated for a target nucleus $^{208}$Pb. We also indicate a measurable second signature of the $p\bar{p}$ photoproduction process by estimating the increased cross section for emission of charged pions as a consequence of $\bar{p}$ annihilation within the nucleus.