• In sunspot umbrae, convection is largely suppressed by the strong magnetic field. Previous measurements reported on negligible convective flows in umbral cores. Based on this, numerous studies have taken the umbra as zero reference to calculate Doppler velocities of the ambient active region. To clarify the amount of convective motion in the darkest part of umbrae, we directly measured Doppler velocities with an unprecedented accuracy and precision. We performed spectroscopic observations of sunspot umbrae with the Laser Absolute Reference Spectrograph (LARS) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. A laser frequency comb enabled the calibration of the high-resolution spectrograph and absolute wavelength positions. A thorough spectral calibration, including the measurement of the reference wavelength, yielded Doppler shifts of the spectral line Ti i 5713.9 {\AA} with an uncertainty of around 5 m s-1. The measured Doppler shifts are a composition of umbral convection and magneto-acoustic waves. For the analysis of convective shifts, we temporally average each sequence to reduce the superimposed wave signal. Compared to convective blueshifts of up to -350 m s-1 in the quiet Sun, sunspot umbrae yield a strongly reduced convective blueshifts around -30 m s-1. {W}e find that the velocity in a sunspot umbra correlates significantly with the magnetic field strength, but also with the umbral temperature defining the depth of the titanium line. The vertical upward motion decreases with increasing field strength. Extrapolating the linear approximation to zero magnetic field reproduces the measured quiet Sun blueshift. Simply taking the sunspot umbra as a zero velocity reference for the calculation of photospheric Dopplergrams can imply a systematic velocity error.
  • LARS is an Absolute Reference Spectrograph designed for ultra-precise solar observations. The high-resolution echelle spectrograph of the Vacuum Tower Telescope is supported by a state-of-the-art laser frequency comb to calibrate the solar spectrum on an absolute wavelength scale. In this article, we describe the scientific instrument and focus on the upgrades in the last two years to turn the prototype into a turn-key system. The pursued goal was to improve the short-term and long-term stability of the systems, and enable a user-friendly and more versatile operation of the instrument. The first upgrade involved the modernization of the frequency comb. The Fabry-Perot cavities were adjusted to filter to a repetition frequency of 8GHz. A technologically matured photonic crystal fiber was implemented for spectral broadening. The second, quite recent upgrade was performed on the optics feeding the sunlight into a single-mode fiber connected to the spectrograph. A motorized translation stage was deployed to allow the automated selection of three different fields-of-view with diameters of 1", 3", and 10" for the analysis of the solar spectrum. The successful upgrades allow for long-term observations of up to several hours per day with a stable spectral accuracy of 1 m/s limited by the spectrograph. Stable, user-friendly operation of the instrument is supported. The selection of the pre-aligned fiber to change the field of view can now be done within seconds. LARS offers the possibility to observe absolute wavelength positions of spectral lines and Doppler velocities in the solar atmosphere. First results demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument for solar science. The accurate measurement of the solar convection, p-modes, and atmospheric waves will enhance our knowledge of the solar atmosphere and its physical conditions to improve current atmospheric models.
  • The solar spectrum is a primary reference for the study of physical processes in stars and their variation during activity cycles. In Nov 2010 an experiment with a prototype of a Laser Frequency Comb (LFC) calibration system was performed with the HARPS spectrograph of the 3.6m ESO telescope at La Silla during which high signal-to-noise spectra of the Moon were obtained. We exploit those Echelle spectra to study the optical integrated solar spectrum . The DAOSPEC program is used to measure solar line positions through gaussian fitting in an automatic way. We first apply the LFC solar spectrum to characterize the CCDs of the HARPS spectrograph. The comparison of the LFC and Th-Ar calibrated spectra reveals S-type distortions on each order along the whole spectral range with an amplitude of +/-40 m/s. This confirms the pattern found by Wilken et al. (2010) on a single order and extends the detection of the distortions to the whole analyzed region revealing that the precise shape varies with wavelength. A new data reduction is implemented to deal with CCD pixel inequalities to obtain a wavelength corrected solar spectrum. By using this spectrum we provide a new LFC calibrated solar atlas with 400 line positions in the range of 476-530, and 175 lines in the 534-585 nm range. The new LFC atlas improves the accuracy of individual lines by a significant factor reaching a mean value of about 10 m/s. The LFC--based solar line wavelengths are essentially free of major instrumental effects and provide a reference for absolute solar line positions. We suggest that future LFC observations could be used to trace small radial velocity changes of the whole solar photospheric spectrum in connection with the solar cycle and for direct comparison with the predicted line positions of 3D radiative hydrodynamical models of the solar photosphere.
  • The use of ultra-precise optical clocks in space ("master clocks") will allow for a range of new applications in the fields of fundamental physics (tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, time and frequency metrology by means of the comparison of distant terrestrial clocks), geophysics (mapping of the gravitational potential of Earth), and astronomy (providing local oscillators for radio ranging and interferometry in space). Within the ELIPS-3 program of ESA, the "Space Optical Clocks" (SOC) project aims to install and to operate an optical lattice clock on the ISS towards the end of this decade, as a natural follow-on to the ACES mission, improving its performance by at least one order of magnitude. The payload is planned to include an optical lattice clock, as well as a frequency comb, a microwave link, and an optical link for comparisons of the ISS clock with ground clocks located in several countries and continents. Undertaking a necessary step towards optical clocks in space, the EU-FP7-SPACE-2010-1 project no. 263500 (SOC2) (2011-2015) aims at two "engineering confidence", accurate transportable lattice optical clock demonstrators having relative frequency instability below 1\times10^-15 at 1 s integration time and relative inaccuracy below 5\times10^-17. This goal performance is about 2 and 1 orders better in instability and inaccuracy, respectively, than today's best transportable clocks. The devices will be based on trapped neutral ytterbium and strontium atoms. One device will be a breadboard. The two systems will be validated in laboratory environments and their performance will be established by comparison with laboratory optical clocks and primary frequency standards. In this paper we present the project and the results achieved during the first year.
  • A wavelength calibration system based on a laser frequency comb (LFC) was developed in a co-operation between the Kiepenheuer-Institut f\"ur Sonnenphysik, Freiburg, Germany and the Max-Planck-Institut f\"ur Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany for permanent installation at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands. The system was installed successfully in October 2011. By simultaneously recording the spectra from the Sun and the LFC, for each exposure a calibration curve can be derived from the known frequencies of the comb modes that is suitable for absolute calibration at the meters per second level. We briefly summarize some topics in solar physics that benefit from absolute spectroscopy and point out the advantages of LFC compared to traditional calibration techniques. We also sketch the basic setup of the VTT calibration system and its integration with the existing echelle spectrograph.
  • The mid-infrared spectral range (2 to 20 \mu m) is of particular importance for chemistry, biology and physics as many molecules exhibit strong ro-vibrational fingerprints. Frequency combs - broad spectral bandwidth coherent light sources consisting of equally spaced sharp lines - are creating new opportunities for advanced spectroscopy. Mid-infrared frequency comb sources have recently emerged but are still facing technological challenges, like achieving high power per comb line and tens of GHz line spacing as required for e.g. direct comb spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate a novel approach to create such a frequency comb via four-wave mixing in a continuous-wave pumped ultra-high Q crystalline microresonator made of magnesium fluoride. Careful choice of the resonator material and design made it possible to generate a broad comb of narrow lines in the mid-infrared: a vast cascade of about 100 lines spaced by 100 GHz spanning 200 nm (~10 THz) at \lambda=2.5 \mu m. With its distinguishing features of compactness, efficient conversion, large mode spacing and high power per comb line, this novel frequency comb source holds promise for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy even deeper in the mid-infrared.
  • Optical frequency combs allow for precise measurement of optical frequencies and are used in a growing number of applications beyond spectroscopy and optical frequency metrology. A class of compact microresonator based frequency comb generators has emerged recently based on (hyper)-parametric frequency conversion, mediated by the Kerr-non-linearity, of a continuous wave laser beam. Despite the rapid progress and the emergence of a wide variety of micro-resonator Kerr-comb platforms, an understanding of the dynamics of the Kerr comb formation is still lacking. In particular the question in which regime low phase noise performance can be achieved has so far not been answered but is of critical importance for future application of this technology. Here an universal, platform independent understanding of the Kerr-comb formation dynamics based on experimental observations in crystalline MgF2 and planar Si3N4 comb generators is given. This explains a wide range of hereto not understood phenomena and reveals for the first time the underlying condition for low phase noise performance.
  • We report on the characterization of a commercial-core fiber-based frequency comb equipped with an intracavity electro-optic modulator (EOM). We investigate the relationship between the noise of the pump diode and the laser relative intensity noise (RIN) and demonstrate the use of a low noise current supply to substantially reduce the laser RIN. By measuring several transfer functions, we evaluate the potentiality of the EOM for comb repetition rate stabilization. We also evaluate the coupling to other relevant parameters of the comb. From these measureemnts, we infer the capabilities of the femtosecond laser comb to generate very low phase noise microwave signals when phase locked to a high spectral purity ultra-stable laser.
  • In an article "Missing Transverse-Doppler Effect in Time-Dilation Experiments with High-Speed Ions" by S. Devasia [arXiv:1003.2970v1], our recent Doppler shift experiments on fast ion beams are reanalyzed. Contrary to our analysis, Devasia concludes that our results provide an "indication of Lorentz violation". We argue that this conclusion is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of our experimental scheme and reiterate that our results are in excellent agreement with Special Relativity.
  • We apply a recently demonstrated method for precision spectroscopy on strong transitions in trapped ions to measure both fine structure components of the 3s-3p transition in 24-Mg+ and 26-Mg+. We deduce absolute frequency reference data for transition frequencies, isotope shifts and fine structure splittings that are in particular useful for comparison with quasar absorption spectra, which test possible space-time variations of the fine structure constant. The measurement accuracy improves previous literature values, when existing, by more than two orders of magnitude.
  • While being invented for precision measurement of single atomic transitions, frequency combs have also become a versatile tool for broadband spectroscopy in the last years. In this paper we present a novel and simple approach for broadband spectroscopy, combining the accuracy of an optical fiber-laser-based frequency comb with the ease-of-use of a tunable external cavity diode laser. This scheme enables broadband and fast spectroscopy of microresonator modes and allows for precise measurements of their dispersion, which is an important precondition for broadband optical frequency comb generation that has recently been demonstrated in these devices. Moreover, we find excellent agreement of measured microresonator dispersion with predicted values from finite element simulations and we show that tailoring microresonator dispersion can be achieved by adjusting their geometrical properties.
  • We demonstrate the long-distance transmission of an ultra-stable optical frequency derived directly from a state-of-the-art optical frequency standard. Using an active stabilization system we deliver the frequency via a 146 km long underground fiber link with a fractional instability of 3*10^{-15} at 1 s, which is close to the theoretical limit for our transfer experiment. The relative uncertainty for the transfer is below 1*10^{-19} after 30 000 seconds. Tests with a very short fiber show that noise in our stabilization system contributes fluctuations which are two orders of magnitude lower, namely 3*10^{-17} at 1 s, reaching 10^{-20} after 4000 s.
  • In this review we discuss the progress of the past decade in testing for a possible temporal variation of the fine structure constant $\alpha$. Advances in atomic sample preparation, laser spectroscopy and optical frequency measurements led to rapid reduction of measurement uncertainties. Eventually laboratory tests became the most sensitive tool to detect a possible variation of $\alpha$ at the present epoch. We explain the methods and technologies that helped make this possible.
  • We investigated the measurement floor and link stability for the transfer of an ultra-stable optical frequency via an optical fiber link. We achieved a near-delay-limited instability of 3x10^(-15)/(tau x Hz) for 147 km deployed fiber, and 10^(-20) (integrations time tau = 4000 s) for the noise floor.
  • We demonstrate control and stabilization of an optical frequency comb generated by four-wave mixing in a monolithic microresonator with a mode spacing in the microwave regime (86 GHz). The comb parameters (mode spacing and offset frequency) are controlled via the power and the frequency of the pump laser, which constitutes one of the comb modes. Furthermore, generation of a microwave beat note at the comb's mode spacing frequency is presented, enabling direct stabilization to a microwave frequency standard.
  • Optical frequency combs provide equidistant frequency markers in the infrared, visible and ultra-violet and can link an unknown optical frequency to a radio or microwave frequency reference. Since their inception frequency combs have triggered major advances in optical frequency metrology and precision measurements and in applications such as broadband laser-based gas sensing8 and molecular fingerprinting. Early work generated frequency combs by intra-cavity phase modulation while to date frequency combs are generated utilizing the comb-like mode structure of mode-locked lasers, whose repetition rate and carrier envelope phase can be stabilized. Here, we report an entirely novel approach in which equally spaced frequency markers are generated from a continuous wave (CW) pump laser of a known frequency interacting with the modes of a monolithic high-Q microresonator13 via the Kerr nonlinearity. The intrinsically broadband nature of parametric gain enables the generation of discrete comb modes over a 500 nm wide span (ca. 70 THz) around 1550 nm without relying on any external spectral broadening. Optical-heterodyne-based measurements reveal that cascaded parametric interactions give rise to an optical frequency comb, overcoming passive cavity dispersion. The uniformity of the mode spacing has been verified to within a relative experimental precision of 7.3*10(-18).
  • We consider the excitation dynamics of the two-photon \sts transition in a beam of atomic hydrogen by 243 nm laser radiation. Specifically, we study the impact of ionization damping on the transition line shape, caused by the possibility of ionization of the 2S level by the same laser field. Using a Monte-Carlo simulation, we calculate the line shape of the \sts transition for the experimental geometry used in the two latest absolute frequency measurements (M. Niering {\it et al.}, PRL 84, 5496 (2000) and M. Fischer {\it et al.}, PRL 92, 230802 (2004)). The calculated line shift and line width are in excellent agreement with the experimentally observed values. From this comparison we can verify the values of the dynamic Stark shift coefficient for the \sts transition for the first time on a level of 15%. We show that the ionization modifies the velocity distribution of the metastable atoms, the line shape of the \sts transition, and has an influence on the derivation of its absolute frequency.
  • The performance of optical clocks has strongly progressed in recent years, and accuracies and instabilities of 1 part in 10^18 are expected in the near future. The operation of optical clocks in space provides new scientific and technological opportunities. In particular, an earth-orbiting satellite containing an ensemble of optical clocks would allow a precision measurement of the gravitational redshift, navigation with improved precision, mapping of the earth's gravitational potential by relativistic geodesy, and comparisons between ground clocks.
  • In 2003 we have measured the absolute frequency of the $(1S, F=1, m_F=\pm 1) \leftrightarrow (2S, F'=1, m_F'=\pm 1)$ two-photon transition in atomic hydrogen. We observed a variation of $(-29\pm 57)$ Hz over a 44 months interval separating this measurement from the previous one performed in 1999. We have combined this result with recently published results of optical transition frequency measurement in the $^{199}$Hg$^+$ ion and and comparison between clocks based on $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs. From this combination we deduce the stringent limits for fractional time variation of the fine structure constant $\partial/{\partial t}(\ln \alpha)=(-0.9\pm 4.2)\times 10^{-15}$ yr$^{-1}$ and for the ratio of $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs spin magnetic moments $\partial/{\partial t}(\ln[\mu_{\rm {Rb}}/\mu_{\rm {Cs}}])=(0.5\pm 2.1)\times 10^{-15}$ yr$^{-1}$. This is the first precise restriction for the fractional time variation of $\alpha$ made without assumptions about the relative drifts of the constants of electromagnetic, strong and weak interactions.
  • We have remeasured the absolute $1S$-$2S$ transition frequency $\nu_{\rm {H}}$ in atomic hydrogen. A comparison with the result of the previous measurement performed in 1999 sets a limit of $(-29\pm 57)$ Hz for the drift of $\nu_{\rm {H}}$ with respect to the ground state hyperfine splitting $\nu_{{\rm {Cs}}}$ in $^{133}$Cs. Combining this result with the recently published optical transition frequency in $^{199}$Hg$^+$ against $\nu_{\rm {Cs}}$ and a microwave $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs clock comparison, we deduce separate limits on $\dot{\alpha}/\alpha = (-0.9\pm 2.9)\times 10^{-15}$ yr$^{-1}$ and the fractional time variation of the ratio of Rb and Cs nuclear magnetic moments $\mu_{\rm {Rb}}/\mu_{\rm {Cs}}$ equal to $(-0.5 \pm 1.7)\times 10^{-15}$ yr$^{-1}$. The latter provides information on the temporal behavior of the constant of strong interaction.
  • The absolute frequency of the In$^{+}$ $5s^{2 1}S_{0}$ - $5s5p^{3}P_{0}$ clock transition at 237 nm was measured with an accuracy of 1.8 parts in $10^{13}$. Using a phase-coherent frequency chain, we compared the $^{1}S_{0}$ - $^{3}P_{0}$ transition with a methane-stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 $\mu$m which was calibrated against an atomic cesium fountain clock. A frequency gap of 37 THz at the fourth harmonic of the He-Ne standard was bridged by a frequency comb generated by a mode-locked femtosecond laser. The frequency of the In$^{+}$ clock transition was found to be $1 267 402 452 899.92 (0.23)$ kHz, the accuracy being limited by the uncertainty of the He-Ne laser reference. This represents an improvement in accuracy of more than 2 orders of magnitude on previous measurements of the line and now stands as the most accurate measurement of an optical transition in a single ion.