• The WISE satellite surveyed the entire sky multiple times in four infrared (IR) wavelengths ($3.4,\ 4.6,\ 12,$ and $22\, \mu$m, Wright et al. 2010). This all-sky IR photometric survey makes it possible to leverage many of the large publicly available spectroscopic redshift surveys to measure galaxy properties in the IR. While characterizing the cross-matching of WISE data to a single survey is a straightforward process, doing it with six different redshift surveys takes a fair amount of space to characterize adequately, because each survey has unique caveats and characteristics that need addressing. This work describes a data set that results from matching five public redshift surveys with the AllWISE data release, along with a reanalysis of the data described in Lake et al. 2012. The combined data set has an additional flux limit of $80\,\mu$Jy ($19.14$ AB mag) in WISE's W1 filter imposed in order to limit it to targets with high completeness and reliable photometry in the AllWISE data set. Consistent analysis of all of the data is only possible if the color bias discussed in Ilbert et al. (2004) is addressed (for example: the techniques explored in the first paper in this series Lake et al. 2017b). The sample defined herein is used in this paper's sequel paper, Lake et al. 2017a), to measure the luminosity function of galaxies at $2.4\, \mu$m rest frame wavelength, and the selection process of the sample is optimized for this purpose.
  • The WISE satellite surveyed the entire sky multiple times in four infrared wavelengths (3.4, 4.6, 12, and $22\,\mu$m; Wright et al. 2010). The unprecedented combination of coverage area and depth gives us the opportunity to measure the luminosity function of galaxies, one of the fundamental quantities in the study of them, at $2.4\ \mu$m to an unparalleled level of formal statistical accuracy in the near infrared. The big advantage of measuring luminosity functions at wavelengths in the window $\approx 2$ to $3.5\,\mu$m is that it correlates more closely to the total stellar mass in galaxies than others. In this paper we report on the parameters for the $2.4\,\mu$m luminosity function of galaxies obtained from applying the spectroluminosity functional based methods defined in Lake et al. (2017b) to the data sets described in Lake et al. (2017a) using the mean and covariance of $2.4\,\mu$m normalized SEDs from Lake & Wright (2016). In terms of single Schechter function parameters evaluated at the present epoch, the combined result is: $\phi_\star = 5.8 \pm [0.3_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.3_{\mathrm{sys}}] \times 10^{-3} \operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$, $L_\star = 6.4 \pm [0.1_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.3_{\mathrm{sys}}] \times 10^{10}\, L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}$ ($M_\star = -21.67 \pm [0.02_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.05_{\mathrm{sys}}]\operatorname{AB\ mag}$), and $\alpha = -1.050 \pm [0.004_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.03_{\mathrm{sys}}]$, corresponding to a galaxy number density of $0.08\operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$ brighter than $10^6\, L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}$ ($10^{-3} \operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$ brighter than $L_\star$) and a $2.4\,\mu$m luminosity density equivalent to $3.8\times10^{8}\,L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}\operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$. $\ldots$
  • We analyze the evolution of the dual AGN in ESO 509-IG066, a galaxy pair located at z=0.034 whose nuclei are separated by 11 kpc. Previous observations with XMM-Newton on this dual AGN found evidence for two moderately obscured ($N_H\sim10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) X-ray luminous ($L_X\sim10^{43}$ erg/s) nuclear sources. We present an analysis of subsequent Chandra, NuSTAR and Swift/XRT observations that show one source has dropped in flux by a factor of 10 between 2004 and 2011, which could be explained by either an increase in the absorbing column or an intrinsic fading of the central engine possibly due to a decrease in mass accretion. Both of these scenarios are predicted by galaxy merger simulations. The source which has dropped in flux is not detected by NuSTAR, which argues against absorption, unless it is extreme. However, new Keck/LRIS optical spectroscopy reveals a previously unreported broad H-alpha line which is highly unlikely to be visible under the extreme absorption scenario. We therefore conclude that the black hole in this nucleus has undergone a dramatic drop in accretion rate. From AO-assisted near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of the other nucleus, we find evidence that the galaxy merger is having a direct effect on the kinematics of the gas close to the nucleus of the galaxy, providing a direct observational link between the galaxy merger and the mass accretion rate on to the black hole.
  • We identify sources with extremely hard X-ray spectra (i.e., with photon indices of Gamma<0.6 in the 13 sq. deg. NuSTAR serendipitous survey, to search for the most highly obscured AGNs detected at >10 keV. Eight extreme NuSTAR sources are identified, and we use the NuSTAR data in combination with lower energy X-ray observations (from Chandra, Swift XRT, and XMM-Newton) to characterize the broad-band (0.5-24 keV) X-ray spectra. We find that all of the extreme sources are highly obscured AGNs, including three robust Compton-thick (CT; N_H > 1.5e24 cm^-2) AGNs at low redshift (z<0.1), and a likely-CT AGN at higher redshift (z=0.16). Most of the extreme sources would not have been identified as highly obscured based on the low energy (<10 keV) X-ray coverage alone. The multiwavelength properties (e.g., optical spectra and X-ray/MIR luminosity ratios) provide further support for the eight sources being significantly obscured. Correcting for absorption, the intrinsic rest-frame 10-40 keV luminosities of the extreme sources cover a broad range, from ~ 5 x 10^42 to 10^45 erg s^-1. The estimated number counts of CT AGNs in the NuSTAR serendipitous survey are in broad agreement with model expectations based on previous X-ray surveys, except for the lowest redshifts (z<0.07) where we measure a high CT fraction of f_CT^obs = 30 (+16 -12) %. For the small sample of CT AGNs, we find a high fraction of galaxy major mergers (50 +/- 33%) compared to control samples of "normal" AGNs.
  • Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are energetic astrophysical sources powered by accretion onto supermassive black holes in galaxies, and present unique observational signatures that cover the full electromagnetic spectrum over more than twenty orders of magnitude in frequency. The rich phenomenology of AGN has resulted in a large number of different "flavours" in the literature that now comprise a complex and confusing AGN "zoo". It is increasingly clear that these classifications are only partially related to intrinsic differences between AGN, and primarily reflect variations in a relatively small number of astrophysical parameters as well the method by which each class of AGN is selected. Taken together, observations in different electromagnetic bands as well as variations over time provide complementary windows on the physics of different sub-structures in the AGN. In this review, we present an overview of AGN multi-wavelength properties with the aim of painting their "big picture" through observations in each electromagnetic band from radio to gamma-rays as well as AGN variability. We address what we can learn from each observational method, the impact of selection effects, the physics behind the emission at each wavelength, and the potential for future studies. To conclude we use these observations to piece together the basic architecture of AGN, discuss our current understanding of unification models, and highlight some open questions that present opportunities for future observational and theoretical progress.
  • Hot, Dust-Obscured Galaxies (Hot DOGs), selected from the WISE all sky infrared survey, host some of the most powerful Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) known, and might represent an important stage in the evolution of galaxies. Most known Hot DOGs are at $z> 1.5$, due in part to a strong bias against identifying them at lower redshift related to the selection criteria. We present a new selection method that identifies 153 Hot DOG candidates at $z\sim 1$, where they are significantly brighter and easier to study. We validate this approach by measuring a redshift $z=1.009$, and an SED similar to higher redshift Hot DOGs for one of these objects, WISE J1036+0449 ($L_{\rm\,Bol}\simeq 8\times 10^{46}\rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$), using data from Keck/LRIS and NIRSPEC, SDSS, and CSO. We find evidence of a broadened component in MgII, which, if due to the gravitational potential of the supermassive black hole, would imply a black hole mass of $M_{\rm\,BH}\simeq 2 \times 10^8 M_{\odot}$, and an Eddington ratio of $\lambda_{\rm\,Edd}\simeq 2.7$. WISE J1036+0449 is the first Hot DOG detected by NuSTAR, and the observations show that the source is heavily obscured, with a column density of $N_{\rm\,H}\simeq(2-15)\times10^{23}\rm\,cm^{-2}$. The source has an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of $\sim 6\times 10^{44}\rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$, a value significantly lower than that expected from the mid-infrared/X-ray correlation. We also find that the other Hot DOGs observed by X-ray facilities show a similar deficiency of X-ray flux. We discuss the origin of the X-ray weakness and the absorption properties of Hot DOGs. Hot DOGs at $z\lesssim1$ could be excellent laboratories to probe the characteristics of the accretion flow and of the X-ray emitting plasma at extreme values of the Eddington ratio.
  • We present an analysis of a deep (1$\sigma$=13 $\mu$Jy) cosmological 1.2-mm continuum map based on ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. In the 1 arcmin$^2$ covered by ASPECS we detect nine sources at $>3.5\sigma$ significance at 1.2-mm. Our ALMA--selected sample has a median redshift of $z=1.6\pm0.4$, with only one galaxy detected at z$>$2 within the survey area. This value is significantly lower than that found in millimeter samples selected at a higher flux density cut-off and similar frequencies. Most galaxies have specific star formation rates similar to that of main sequence galaxies at the same epoch, and we find median values of stellar mass and star formation rates of $4.0\times10^{10}\ M_\odot$ and $\sim40~M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Using the dust emission as a tracer for the ISM mass, we derive depletion times that are typically longer than 300 Myr, and we find molecular gas fractions ranging from $\sim$0.1 to 1.0. As noted by previous studies, these values are lower than using CO--based ISM estimates by a factor $\sim$2. The 1\,mm number counts (corrected for fidelity and completeness) are in agreement with previous studies that were typically restricted to brighter sources. With our individual detections only, we recover $55\pm4\%$ of the extragalactic background light (EBL) at 1.2 mm measured by the Planck satellite, and we recover $80\pm7\%$ of this EBL if we include the bright end of the number counts and additional detections from stacking. The stacked contribution is dominated by galaxies at $z\sim1-2$, with stellar masses of (1-3)$\times$10$^{10}$ M$_\odot$. For the first time, we are able to characterize the population of galaxies that dominate the EBL at 1.2 mm.
  • Observed at z = 4.601 and with L_bol = 3.5 x 10^14 Lsun, W2246-0526 is the most luminous galaxy known in the Universe, and hosts a deeply-buried active galactic nucleus (AGN)/super-massive black hole (SMBH). Discovered using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), W2246-0526 is classified as a Hot Dust Obscured Galaxy (Hot DOG), based on its luminosity and dust temperature. Here we present spatially resolved ALMA [CII]157.7um observations of W2246-0526, providing unique insight into the kinematics of its interstellar medium (ISM). The measured [CII]-to-far-infrared ratio is ~2 x 10^-4, implying ISM conditions that compare only with the most obscured, compact starbursts and AGN in the local Universe today. The spatially resolved [CII] line is strikingly uniform and very broad, 500-600 km/s wide, extending throughout the entire galaxy over about 2.5 kpc, with modest shear. Such a large, homogeneous velocity dispersion indicates a highly turbulent medium. W2246-0526 is unstable in terms of the energy and momentum that are being injected into the ISM, strongly suggesting that the gas is being blown away from the system isotropically, likely reflecting a cathartic state on its road to becoming an un-obscured quasar. W2246-0526 provides an extraordinary laboratory to study and model the properties and kinematics of gas in an extreme environment under strong feedback, at a time when the Universe was 1/10 of its current age: a system pushing the limits that can be reached during galaxy formation.
  • The intrinsic column density (NH) distribution of quasars is poorly known. At the high obscuration end of the quasar population and for redshifts z<1, the X-ray spectra can only be reliably characterized using broad-band measurements which extend to energies above 10 keV. Using the hard X-ray observatory NuSTAR, along with archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data, we study the broad-band X-ray spectra of nine optically selected (from the SDSS), candidate Compton-thick (NH > 1.5e24 cm^-2) type 2 quasars (CTQSO2s); five new NuSTAR observations are reported herein, and four have been previously published. The candidate CTQSO2s lie at z<0.5, have observed [OIII] luminosities in the range 8.4 < log (L_[OIII]/L_solar) < 9.6, and show evidence for extreme, Compton-thick absorption when indirect absorption diagnostics are considered. Amongst the nine candidate CTQSO2s, five are detected by NuSTAR in the high energy (8-24 keV) band: two are weakly detected at the ~ 3 sigma confidence level and three are strongly detected with sufficient counts for spectral modeling (>~ 90 net source counts at 8-24 keV). For these NuSTAR-detected sources direct (i.e., X-ray spectral) constraints on the intrinsic AGN properties are feasible, and we measure column densities ~2.5-1600 times higher and intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray luminosities ~10-70 times higher than pre-NuSTAR constraints from Chandra and XMM-Newton. Assuming the NuSTAR-detected type 2 quasars are representative of other Compton-thick candidates, we make a correction to the NH distribution for optically selected type 2 quasars as measured by Chandra and XMM-Newton for 39 objects. With this approach, we predict a Compton-thick fraction of f_CT = 36^{+14}_{-12} %, although higher fractions (up to 76%) are possible if indirect absorption diagnostics are assumed to be reliable.
  • In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the AGN continuum, and measurements of the broad H-beta line widths in mean and root-mean square (rms) spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad H-beta line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad H-beta width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region "breathes" on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad H-beta velocity centroids can undergo substantial changes in response to continuum variations; in NGC 4593 the broad H-beta velocity shifted by ~250 km/s over a one-month duration. This reverberation-induced velocity shift effect is likely to contribute a significant source of confusion noise to binary black hole searches that use multi-epoch quasar spectroscopy to detect binary orbital motion. We also present results from simulations that examine biases that can occur in measurement of broad-line widths from rms spectra due to the contributions of continuum variations and photon-counting noise.
  • We calculate the angular correlation function for a sample of 170,000 AGN extracted from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalog, selected to have red mid-IR colors (W1 - W2 > 0.8) and 4.6 micron flux densities brighter than 0.14 mJy). The sample is expected to be >90% reliable at identifying AGN, and to have a mean redshift of z=1.1. In total, the angular clustering of WISE-AGN is roughly similar to that of optical AGN. We cross-match these objects with the photometric SDSS catalog and distinguish obscured sources with (r - W2) > 6 from bluer, unobscured AGN. Obscured sources present a higher clustering signal than unobscured sources. Since the host galaxy morphologies of obscured AGN are not typical red sequence elliptical galaxies and show disks in many cases, it is unlikely that the increased clustering strength of the obscured population is driven by a host galaxy segregation bias. By using relatively complete redshift distributions from the COSMOS survey, we find obscured sources at mean redshift z=0.9 have a bias of b = 2.9 \pm 0.6 and are hosted in dark matter halos with a typical mass of log(M/M_odot)~13.5. In contrast, unobscured AGN at z~1.1 have a bias of b = 1.6 \pm 0.6 and inhabit halos of log(M/M_odot)~12.4. These findings suggest that obscured AGN inhabit denser environments than unobscured AGN, and are difficult to reconcile with the simplest AGN unification models, where obscuration is driven solely by orientation.
  • We present NuSTAR hard X-ray (3-79 keV) observations of three Type 2 quasars at z ~ 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [OIII] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength diagnostics, their X-ray absorbing column densities (N_H) are poorly known. In this analysis: (1) we study X-ray emission at >10 keV, where X-rays from the central black hole are relatively unabsorbed, in order to better constrain N_H; (2) we further characterize the physical properties of the sources through broad-band near-UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) analyses. One of the quasars is detected with NuSTAR at >8 keV with a no-source probability of <0.1%, and its X-ray band ratio suggests near Compton-thick absorption with N_H \gtrsim 5 x 10^23 cm^-2. The other two quasars are undetected, and have low X-ray to mid-IR luminosity ratios in both the low energy (2-10 keV) and high energy (10-40 keV) X-ray regimes that are consistent with extreme, Compton-thick absorption (N_H \gtrsim 10^24 cm^-2). We find that for quasars at z ~ 0.5, NuSTAR provides a significant improvement compared to lower energy (<10 keV) Chandra and XMM-Newton observations alone, as higher column densities can now be directly constrained.
  • We quantify the fraction of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) that originates from galaxies identified in the UV/optical/near-infrared by stacking 81,250 (~35.7 arcmin^2) K-selected sources (K_AB < 24.0), split according to their rest-frame U - V vs. V - J colors into 72,216 star-forming and 9,034 quiescent galaxies, on maps from Spitzer/MIPS (24um), Herschel/SPIRE (250, 350, 500um), Herschel/PACS (100, 160um), and AzTEC (1100um). The fraction of the CIB resolved by our catalog is (69 $\pm$ 15)% at 24um, (78 $\pm$ 17)% at 70um, (58 $\pm$ 13)% at 100um, (78 $\pm$ 18)% at 160um, (80 $\pm$ 17)% at 250um, (69 $\pm$ 14)% at 350um, (65 $\pm$ 12)% at 500um, and (45 $\pm$ 8)% at 1100um. Of that total, about 95% originates from star-forming galaxies, while the remaining 5% is from apparently quiescent galaxies. The CIB at $\lambda$ < 200um is sourced predominantly from galaxies at z < 1, while at $\lambda$ > 200um the bulk originates from 1 < z < 2. Galaxies with stellar masses log(M/ M_sun)=9.5-11 are responsible for the majority of the CIB, with those in the log(M/ M_sun)=9.5-10 contributing mostly at $\lambda$ < 250um, and those in the log(M/ M_sun)=10.5-11 bin dominating at $\lambda$ > 350um. The contribution from galaxies in the log(M/ M_sun)=9.0-9.5 and log(M/ M_sun)=11.0-12.0 stellar mass bins contribute the least, both of order 5%, although the highest stellar-mass bin is a significant contributor to the luminosity density at z > 2. The luminosities of the galaxies responsible for the CIB shifts from a combination of "normal" and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) at $\lambda$ < 160um, to LIRGs at 160um < $\lambda$ < 500um, to finally LIRGs and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at $\lambda$ > 500um. Stacking analyses were performed with SIMSTACK (available at http://www.astro.caltech.edu/~viero/viero_homepage/toolbox.html) which accounts for possible biases due to clustering.
  • We report on the first ten identifications of sources serendipitously detected by the NuSTAR to provide the first sensitive census of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) source population at >10 keV. We find that these NuSTAR-detected sources are ~100x fainter than those previously detected at >10 keV and have a broad range in redshift and luminosity (z=0.020-2.923 and L_10-40 keV~4x10^{41}-5x10^{45} erg/s); the median redshift and luminosity are z~0.7 and L_10-40 keV~3x10^{44} erg/s, respectively. We characterize these sources on the basis of broad-band ~0.5-32 keV spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and broad-band ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared SED analyzes. We find that the dominant source population is quasars with L_10-40 keV>10^{44} erg/s, of which ~50% are obscured with N_H>10^{22} cm^{-2}. However, none of the ten NuSTAR sources are Compton thick (N_H>10^{24} cm^{-2}) and we place a 90% confidence upper limit on the fraction of Compton-thick quasars (L_10-40 keV>10^{44} erg/s) selected at >10 keV of ~33% over the redshift range z=0.5-1.1. We jointly fitted the rest-frame ~10-40 keV data for all of the non-beamed sources with L_10-40 keV>10^{43} erg/s to constrain the average strength of reflection; we find R<1.4 for \Gamma=1.8, broadly consistent with that found for local AGNs observed at >10 keV. We also constrain the host galaxy masses and find a median stellar mass of ~10^{11} M_sun, a factor ~5 times higher than the median stellar mass of nearby high-energy selected AGNs, which may be at least partially driven by the order of magnitude higher X-ray luminosities of the NuSTAR sources. Within the low source-statistic limitations of our study, our results suggest that the overall properties of the NuSTAR sources are broadly similar to those of nearby high-energy selected AGNs but scaled up in luminosity and mass.
  • We cross-matched Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) sources brighter than 1 mJy at 12um with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy spectroscopic catalog to produce a sample of ~10^5 galaxies at <z>=0.08, the largest of its kind. This sample is dominated (70%) by star-forming (SF) galaxies from the blue sequence, with total IR luminosities in the range ~10^8-10^12 L_sun. We identify which stellar populations are responsible for most of the 12um emission. We find that most (~80%) of the 12um emission in SF galaxies is produced by stellar populations younger than 0.6 Gyr. In contrast, the 12um emission in weak AGN (L[OIII]<10^7 L_sun) is produced by older stars, with ages of ~1-3 Gyr. We find that L_[12um] linearly correlates with stellar mass for SF galaxies. At fixed 12um luminosity, weak AGN deviate toward higher masses since they tend to be hosted by massive, early-type galaxies with older stellar populations. Star-forming galaxies and weak AGN follow different L_[12um]-SFR (star formation rate) relations, with weak AGN showing excess 12um emission at low SFR (~0.02-1 M_sun/yr). This is likely due to dust grains heated by older stars. While the specific star formation rate (SSFR) of SF galaxies is nearly constant, the SSFR of weak AGN decreases by ~3 orders of magnitude, reflecting the very different star formation efficiencies between SF galaxies and massive, early-type galaxies. Stronger type II AGN in our sample (L_[OIII]>10^7 L_sun), act as an extension of massive SF galaxies, connecting the SF and weak AGN sequences. This suggests a picture where galaxies form stars normally until an AGN (possibly after a starburst episode) starts to gradually quench the SF activity. We also find that 4.6-12um color is a useful first-order indicator of SF activity in a galaxy when no other data are available.
  • The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011 observing campaign was carried out over the course of 11 weeks in Spring 2011. Here we present the first results from this program, a measurement of the broad-line reverberation lag in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50. Combining our data with supplemental observations obtained prior to the start of the main observing campaign, our dataset covers a total duration of 4.5 months. During this time, Mrk 50 was highly variable, exhibiting a maximum variability amplitude of a factor of 4 in the U-band continuum and a factor of 2 in the H-beta line. Using standard cross-correlation techniques, we find that H-beta and H-gamma lag the V-band continuum by tau_cen = 10.64(-0.93,+0.82) and 8.43(-1.28,+1.30) days, respectively, while the lag of He II 4686 is unresolved. The H-beta line exhibits a symmetric velocity-resolved reverberation signature with shorter lags in the high-velocity wings than in the line core, consistent with an origin in a broad-line region dominated by orbital motion rather than infall or outflow. Assuming a virial normalization factor of f=5.25, the virial estimate of the black hole mass is (3.2+-0.5)*10^7 solar masses. These observations demonstrate that Mrk 50 is among the most promising nearby active galaxies for detailed investigations of broad-line region structure and dynamics.
  • We report the discovery of a six-month-long mid-infrared transient, SDWFS-MT-1 (aka SN 2007va), in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Bootes field. The transient, located in a z=0.19 low luminosity (M_[4.5]~-18.6 mag, L/L_MilkyWay~0.01) metal-poor (12+log(O/H)~7.8) irregular galaxy, peaked at a mid-infrared absolute magnitude of M_[4.5]~-24.2 in the 4.5 micron Spitzer/IRAC band and emitted a total energy of at least 10^51 ergs. The optical emission was likely fainter than the mid-infrared, although our constraints on the optical emission are poor because the transient peaked when the source was "behind" the Sun. The Spitzer data are consistent with emission by a modified black body with a temperature of ~1350 K. We rule out a number of scenarios for the origin of the transient such as a Galactic star, AGN activity, GRB, tidal disruption of a star by a black hole and gravitational lensing. The most plausible scenario is a supernova exploding inside a massive, optically thick circumstellar medium, composed of multiple shells of previously ejected material. If the proposed scenario is correct, then a significant fraction (~10%) of the most luminous supernova may be self-enshrouded by dust not only before but also after the supernova occurs. The spectral energy distribution of the progenitor of such a supernova would be a slightly cooler version of eta Carina, peaking at 20-30 microns.
  • Here we introduce PHAT, the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing programme, an international initiative to test and compare different methods of photo-z estimation. Two different test environments are set up, one (PHAT0) based on simulations to test the basic functionality of the different photo-z codes, and another one (PHAT1) based on data from the GOODS survey. The accuracy of the different methods is expressed and ranked by the global photo-z bias, scatter, and outlier rates. Most methods agree well on PHAT0 but produce photo-z scatters that can differ by up to a factor of two even in this idealised case. A larger spread in accuracy is found for PHAT1. Few methods benefit from the addition of mid-IR photometry. Remaining biases and systematic effects can be explained by shortcomings in the different template sets and the use of priors on the one hand and an insufficient training set on the other hand. Scatters of 4-8% in Delta_z/(1+z) were obtained, consistent with other studies. However, somewhat larger outlier rates (>7.5% with Delta_z/(1+z)>0.15; >4.5% after cleaning) are found for all codes. There is a general trend that empirical codes produce smaller biases than template-based codes. The systematic, quantitative comparison of different photo-z codes presented here is a snapshot of the current state-of-the-art of photo-z estimation and sets a standard for the assessment of photo-z accuracy in the future. The rather large outlier rates reported here for PHAT1 on real data should be investigated further since they are most probably also present (and possibly hidden) in many other studies. The test data sets are publicly available and can be used to compare new methods to established ones and help in guiding future photo-z method development. (abridged)
  • (Abridged) OJ287 is a BL Lac object that has shown double-peaked bursts at regular intervals of ~12 yr during the last ~40 yr. We analyse optical photopolarimetric monitoring data from 2005-2009, during which the latest double-peaked outburst occurred. The aim of this study is twofold: firstly, we aim to analyse variability patterns and statistical properties of the optical polarization light-curve. We find a strong preferred position angle in optical polarization. The preferred position angle can be explained by separating the jet emission into two components: an optical polarization core and chaotic jet emission. The optical polarization core is stable on time scales of years and can be explained as emission from an underlying quiescent jet component. The chaotic jet emission sometimes exhibits a circular movement in the Stokes plane. We interpret these events as a shock front moving forwards and backwards in the jet, swiping through a helical magnetic field. Secondly, we use our data to assess different binary black hole models proposed to explain the regularly appearing double-peaked bursts in OJ287. We compose a list of requirements a model has to fulfil. The list includes not only characteristics of the light-curve but also other properties of OJ287, such as the black hole mass and restrictions on accretion flow properties. We rate all existing models using this list and conclude that none of the models is able to explain all observations. We discuss possible new explanations and propose a new approach to understanding OJ287. We suggest that both the double-peaked bursts and the evolution of the optical polarization position angle could be explained as a sign of resonant accretion of magnetic field lines, a 'magnetic breathing' of the disc.
  • Of the approximately 350 extrasolar planets currently known, of order 10% orbit evolved stars with radii R >~ 2.5 R_sun. These planets are of particular interest because they tend to orbit more massive hosts, and have been subjected to variable stellar insolation over their recent histories as their primaries evolved off the main sequence. Unfortunately, we have limited information about the physical properties of these planets, as they were all detected by the radial velocity method and none have been observed to transit. Here we evaluate the prospects for detecting transits of planetary companions to giant stars. We show that several of the known systems have a priori transit probabilities of >~ 10%, and about one transiting system is expected for the sample of host stars with R >= 2.5 R_sun. Although the transits are expected to have very small amplitudes (~few x 10^-4) and long durations (>~ 50 hrs), we argue that the difficulty with detecting these signals in broadband light is one of systematic errors and practicality rather than photon noise, even for modest aperture ~1m telescopes. We propose a novel method that may overcome these difficulties, which uses narrow-band measurements to isolate the thin ring of chromospheric emission expected at the limb of giant stars. The transit signals in these narrow bands are expected to be larger in magnitude and briefer in duration than in broad-band emission, and thus alleviating many of the difficulties with transit detection in broad-band emission. Finally, we point out that it may be possible to discover planetary companions to giant stars using Kepler, provided that a sufficient number of such targets are monitored.
  • We present the results of a recent reverberation-mapping campaign undertaken to improve measurements of the radius of the broad line region and the central black hole mass of the quasar PG 2130+099. Cross correlation of the 5100 angstrom continuum and H-beta emission-line light curves yields a time lag of 22.9 (+4.4 - 4.3) days, corresponding to a central black hole mass MBH= 3.8 (+/- 1.5) x 10^7 Msun. This value supports the notion that previous measurements yielded an incorrect lag. We re-analyzed previous datasets to investigate the possible sources of the discrepancy and conclude that previous measurement errors were apparently caused by a combination of undersampling of the light curves and long-term secular changes in the H-beta emission-line equivalent width. With our new measurements, PG 2130+099 is no longer an outlier in either the R-L or the MBH-Sigma relationships.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.