• We present six galaxies at z~2 that show evidence of Lyman continuum (LyC) emission based on the newly acquired UV imaging of the Hubble Deep UV legacy survey (HDUV) conducted with the WFC3/UVIS camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). At the redshift of these sources, the HDUV F275W images partially probe the ionizing continuum. By exploiting the HST multi-wavelength data available in the HDUV/GOODS fields, models of the UV spectral energy distributions, and detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the intergalactic medium absorption, we estimate the absolute ionizing photon escape fractions of these galaxies to be very high -- typically >60% (>13% for all sources at 90% likelihood). Our findings are in broad agreement with previous studies that found only a small fraction of galaxies to show high escape fraction. These six galaxies comprise the largest sample yet of LyC leaking candidates at z~2 whose inferred LyC flux has been cleanly observed at HST resolution. While three of our six candidates show evidence of hosting an active galactic nucleus (AGN), two of these are heavily obscured and their LyC emission appears to originate from star-forming regions rather than the central nucleus. This suggests an AGN-aided pathway for LyC escape from these sources. Extensive multi-wavelength data in the GOODS fields, especially the near-IR grism spectra from the 3D-HST survey, enable us to study the candidates in detail and tentatively test some recently proposed indirect methods to probe LyC leakage -- namely, the [OIII]/[OII] line ratio and the H$\beta-$UV slope diagram. High-resolution spectroscopic followup of our candidates will help constrain such indirect methods which are our only hope of studying $f_{esc}$ at z~5-9 in the fast-approaching era of the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • Dusty star-forming galaxies are among the most prodigious systems at high redshift (z>1), characterized by high star formation rates and huge dust reservoirs. The bright end of this population has been well characterized in recent years, but considerable uncertainties remain for fainter dusty star-forming galaxies, which are responsible for the bulk of star formation at high redshift and thus play a key role in galaxy growth and evolution. In this first paper of our series, we describe our methods for finding high redshift faint dusty galaxies using millimeter observations with ALMA. We obtained ALMA 1.1 mm mosaic images for three strong-lensing galaxy clusters from the Frontier Fields survey. The 2'x2' mosaics overlap with the deep HST WFC3/IR footprints and encompass the high magnification regions of each cluster. The combination of extremely high ALMA sensitivity and the magnification power of these clusters allows us to systematically probe the sub-mJy population of dusty star-forming galaxies over a large surveyed area. We present a description of the reduction and analysis of the ALMA continuum observations for the galaxy clusters Abell 2744 (z=0.308), MACSJ0416.1-2403 (z=0.396) and MACSJ1149.5+2223 (z=0.543), for which we reach observed rms sensitivities of 55, 59 and 71 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ respectively. We detect 12 dusty star-forming galaxies at S/N>5.0 across the three clusters, all of them presenting coincidence with NIR detected counterparts in the HST images. None of the sources fall close to the lensing caustics, thus they are not strongly lensed. The observed 1.1 mm flux densities for the total sample of galaxies range from 0.41 to 2.82 mJy, with observed effective radii spanning <0.05" to 0.37"$\pm$0.21". The lensing-corrected sizes of the detected sources appear to be in the same range as those measured in brighter samples, albeit with possibly larger dispersion.
  • The deep, wide-area (~800-900 arcmin**2) near-infrared/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS fields have been a remarkable resource for constraining the bright end of high redshift UV luminosity functions (LFs). However, the lack of HST 1.05-micron observations over the CANDELS fields has made it difficult to identify z~9-10 sources robustly, since such data are needed to confirm the presence of an abrupt Lyman break at 1.2 microns. We report here on the successful identification of many such z~9-10 sources from a new HST program (z9-CANDELS) that targets the highest-probability z~9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 microns, to search for a robust Lyman-break at 1.2 microns. The potential z~9-10 candidates are preselected from the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-infrared observations. We identified 15 credible z~9-10 galaxies over the CANDELS fields. Nine of these galaxies lie at z~9 and 5 are new identifications. Our targeted follow-up strategy has proven to be very efficient in making use of scarce HST time to secure a reliable sample of z~9-10 galaxies. Through extensive simulations, we replicate the selection process for our sample (both the preselection and follow-up) and use it to improve current estimates for the volume density of bright z~9 and z~10 galaxies. The volume densities we find are 5(-2)(+3)x and 8(-3)(+9)x lower, respectively, than found at z~8. When compared with the best-fit evolution (i.e., dlog_{10} rho(UV)/dz=-0.29+/-0.02) in the UV luminosities densities from z~8 to z~4 integrated to 0.3L*(z=3) (-20 mag), these luminosity densities are 2.6(-0.9)(+1.5)x and 2.2(-1.1)(+2.0)x lower, respectively, than the extrapolated trends. Our new results are broadly consistent with the "accelerated evolution" scenario at z>8, as seen in many theoretical models.
  • The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) enabled the search for the first galaxies observed at z ~ 8 - 11 (500 - 700 Myr after the Big Bang). To continue quantifying the number density of the most luminous galaxies (M_AB ~ -22.0) at the earliest epoch observable with HST, we search for z ~ 10 galaxies (F125W-dropouts) in archival data from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG[z8]) survey, originally designed for detection of z ~ 8 galaxies (F098M-dropouts). By focusing on the deepest 293 arcmin^2 of the data along 62 independent lines of sight, we identify six z ~ 10 candidates satisfying the color selection criteria, detected at S/N > 8 in F160W with M_AB = -22.8 to -21.1 if at z = 10. Three of the six sources, including the two brightest, are in a single WFC3 pointing (~ 4 arcmin^2), suggestive of significant clustering, which is expected from bright galaxies at z ~ 10. However, the two brightest galaxies are too extended to be likely at z ~ 10, and one additional source is unresolved and possibly a brown dwarf. The remaining three candidates have m_AB ~ 26, and given the area and completeness of our search, our best estimate is a number density of sources that is marginally higher but consistent at 2{\sigma} with searches in legacy fields. Our study highlights that z ~ 10 searches can yield a small number of candidates, making tailored follow-ups of HST pure-parallel observations viable and effective.
  • We identify 4 unusually bright (H < 25.5) galaxies from HST and Spitzer CANDELS data with probable redshifts z ~ 7-9. These identifications include the brightest-known galaxies to date at z > 7.5. As Y-band observations are not available over the full CANDELS program to perform a standard Lyman-break selection of z > 7 galaxies, we employ an alternate strategy using deep Spitzer/IRAC data. We identify z ~ 7.1 - 9.1 galaxies by selecting z >~ 6 galaxies from the HST CANDELS data that show quite red IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] colors, indicating strong [OIII]+Hbeta lines in the 4.5 micron band. This selection strategy was validated using a modest sample for which we have deep Y-band coverage, and subsequently used to select the brightest z > 7 sources. Applying the IRAC criteria to all HST-selected optical-dropout galaxies over the full ~900 arcmin**2 of the CANDELS survey revealed four unusually bright z ~ 7.1, 7.6, 7.9 and 8.6 candidates. The median [3.6]-[4.5] color of our selected z ~ 7.1-9.1 sample is consistent with rest-frame [OIII]+Hbeta EWs of ~1500A, in the [4.5] band. Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy has been independently reported for two of our selected sources, showing Ly-alpha at redshifts of 7.7302+/-0.0006 and 8.683^+0.001_-0.004, respectively. We present similar Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy for a third selected galaxy with a probable 4.7sigma Ly-alpha line at z_spec=7.4770+/-0.0008. All three have H-band magnitudes of ~25 mag and are ~0.5 mag more luminous (M(UV) ~ -22.0) than any previously discovered z ~ 8 galaxy, with important implications for the UV LF. Our 3 brightest, highest redshift z > 7 galaxies all lie within the CANDELS EGS field, providing a dramatic illustration of the potential impact of field-to-field variance.
  • We have identified 274 M-type Brown Dwarfs in the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) pure parallel fields from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey for high redshift galaxies. These are near-infrared observations with multiple lines-of-sight out of our Milky Way. Using these observed M-type Brown Dwarfs we fitted a Galactic disk and halo model with a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis. This model worked best with the scale length of the disk fixed at $h$ = 2.6 kpc. For the scale height of the disk, we found $z_0 = 0.29^{+0.02}_{-0.019}$ kpc and for the central number density $\rho_0 = 0.29^{+0.20}_{-0.13}$ \#/pc$^3$. For the halo we derived a flattening parameter $\kappa$ = 0.45$\pm{0.04}$ and a power-law index $p$ = 2.4$\pm{0.07}$. We found the fraction of M-type brown dwarfs in the local density that belong to the halo to be $f_{h}$ = 0.0075$^{+0.0025}_{-0.0019}$. We found no correlation between subtype of M-dwarf and any model parameters. The total number of M-type Brown Dwarfs in the disk and halo was determined to be $58.2^{+9.81}_{-6.70} \times10^{9}$. We found an upper limit for the fraction of M-type Brown Dwarfs in the halo of 7$^{+5}_{-4}$\%. The upper limit for the total Galactic Disk mass in M-dwarfs is $4.34^{+0.73}_{-0.5}\times10^{9}$ $M_{\odot}$, assuming all M-type Brown Dwarfs have a mass of $80 M_J$.
  • We present Hubble WFC3/IR slitless grism spectra of a remarkably bright $z\gtrsim10$ galaxy candidate, GN-z11, identified initially from CANDELS/GOODS-N imaging data. A significant spectroscopic continuum break is detected at $\lambda=1.47\pm0.01~\mu$m. The new grism data, combined with the photometric data, rule out all plausible lower redshift solutions for this source. The only viable solution is that this continuum break is the Ly$\alpha$ break redshifted to ${z_\mathrm{grism}=11.09^{+0.08}_{-0.12}}$, just $\sim$400 Myr after the Big Bang. This observation extends the current spectroscopic frontier by 150 Myr to well before the Planck (instantaneous) cosmic reionization peak at z~8.8, demonstrating that galaxy build-up was well underway early in the reionization epoch at z>10. GN-z11 is remarkably and unexpectedly luminous for a galaxy at such an early time: its UV luminosity is 3x larger than L* measured at z~6-8. The Spitzer IRAC detections up to 4.5 $\mu$m of this galaxy are consistent with a stellar mass of ${\sim10^{9}~M_\odot}$. This spectroscopic redshift measurement suggests that the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to similarly and easily confirm such sources at z>10 and characterize their physical properties through detailed spectroscopy. Furthermore, WFIRST, with its wide-field near-IR imaging, would find large numbers of similar galaxies and contribute greatly to JWST's spectroscopy, if it is launched early enough to overlap with JWST.
  • We present the first results and design from the redshift z~9-10 Brightest of the Reionizing Galaxies {\it Hubble Space Telescope} survey BoRG[z9-10], aimed at searching for intrinsically luminous unlensed galaxies during the first 700 Myr after the Big Bang. BoRG[z9-10] is the continuation of a multi-year pure-parallel near-IR and optical imaging campaign with the Wide Field Camera 3. The ongoing survey uses five filters, optimized for detecting the most distant objects and offering continuous wavelength coverage from {\lambda}=0.35{\mu}m to {\lambda}=1.7{\mu}m. We analyze the initial ~130 arcmin$^2$ of area over 28 independent lines of sight (~25% of the total planned) to search for z>7 galaxies using a combination of Lyman break and photometric redshift selections. From an effective comoving volume of (5-25) $times 10^5$ Mpc$^3$ for magnitudes brighter than $m_{AB}=26.5-24.0$ in the $H_{160}$-band respectively, we find five galaxy candidates at z~8.3-10 detected at high confidence (S/N>8), including a source at z~8.4 with mAB=24.5 (S/N~22), which, if confirmed, would be the brightest galaxy identified at such early times (z>8). In addition, BoRG[z9-10] data yield four galaxies with $7.3 \lesssim z \lesssim 8$. These new Lyman break galaxies with m$\lesssim26.5$ are ideal targets for follow-up observations from ground and space based observatories to help investigate the complex interplay between dark matter growth, galaxy assembly, and reionization.
  • Thomson optical depth tau measurements from Planck provide new insights into the reionization of the universe. In pursuit of model-independent constraints on the properties of the ionising sources, we determine the empirical evolution of the cosmic ionizing emissivity. We use a simple two-parameter model to map out the evolution in the emissivity at z>~6 from the new Planck optical depth tau measurements, from the constraints provided by quasar absorption spectra and from the prevalence of Ly-alpha emission in z~7-8 galaxies. We find the redshift evolution in the emissivity dot{N}_{ion}(z) required by the observations to be d(log Nion)/dz=-0.15(-0.11)(+0.08), largely independent of the assumed clumping factor C_{HII} and entirely independent of the nature of the ionising sources. The trend in dot{N}_{ion}(z) is well-matched by the evolution of the galaxy UV-luminosity density (dlog_{10} rho_UV/dz=-0.11+/-0.04) to a magnitude limit >~-13 mag, suggesting that galaxies are the sources that drive the reionization of the universe. The role of galaxies is further strengthened by the conversion from the UV luminosity density rho_UV to dot(N)_{ion}(z) being possible for physically-plausible values of the escape fraction f_{esc}, the Lyman-continuum photon production efficiency xi_{ion}, and faint-end cut-off $M_{lim}$ to the luminosity function. Quasars/AGN appear to match neither the redshift evolution nor normalization of the ionizing emissivity. Based on the inferred evolution in the ionizing emissivity, we estimate that the z~10 UV-luminosity density is 8(-4)(+15)x lower than at $z~6, consistent with the observations. The present approach of contrasting the inferred evolution of the ionizing emissivity with that of the galaxy UV luminosity density adds to the growing observational evidence that faint, star-forming galaxies drive the reionization of the universe.
  • The IRAC ultradeep field (IUDF) and IRAC Legacy over GOODS (IGOODS) programs are two ultradeep imaging surveys at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). The primary aim is to directly detect the infrared light of reionization epoch galaxies at z > 7 and to constrain their stellar populations. The observations cover the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), including the two HUDF parallel fields, and the CANDELS/GOODS-South, and are combined with archival data from all previous deep programs into one ultradeep dataset. The resulting imaging reaches unprecedented coverage in IRAC 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m ranging from > 50 hour over 150 arcmin^2, > 100 hour over 60 sq arcmin2, to 200 hour over 5 - 10 arcmin$^2$. This paper presents the survey description, data reduction, and public release of reduced mosaics on the same astrometric system as the CANDELS/GOODS-South WFC3 data. To facilitate prior-based WFC3+IRAC photometry, we introduce a new method to create high signal-to-noise PSFs from the IRAC data and reconstruct the complex spatial variation due to survey geometry. The PSF maps are included in the release, as are registered maps of subsets of the data to enable reliability and variability studies. Simulations show that the noise in the ultradeep IRAC images decreases approximately as the square root of integration time over the range 20 - 200 hours, well below the classical confusion limit, reaching 1{\sigma} point source sensitivities as faint as of 15 nJy (28.5 AB) at 3.6{\mu}m and 18 nJy (28.3 AB) at 4.5{\mu}m. The value of such ultradeep IRAC data is illustrated by direct detections of z = 7 - 8 galaxies as faint as HAB = 28.
  • We present a spectroscopic redshift measurement of a very bright Lyman break galaxy at z=7.7302+-0.0006 using Keck/MOSFIRE. The source was pre-selected photometrically in the EGS field as a robust z~8 candidate with H=25.0 mag based on optical non-detections and a very red Spitzer/IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] broad-band color driven by high equivalent width [OIII]+Hbeta line emission. The Lyalpha line is reliably detected at 6.1 sigma and shows an asymmetric profile as expected for a galaxy embedded in a relatively neutral inter-galactic medium near the Planck peak of cosmic reionization. The line has a rest-frame equivalent width of EW0=21+-4 A and is extended with V_FWHM=360+90-70 km/s. The source is perhaps the brightest and most massive z~8 Lyman break galaxy in the full CANDELS and BoRG/HIPPIES surveys, having assembled already 10^(9.9+-0.2) M_sol of stars at only 650 Myr after the Big Bang. The spectroscopic redshift measurement sets a new redshift record for galaxies. This enables reliable constraints on the stellar mass, star-formation rate, formation epoch, as well as combined [OIII]+Hbeta line equivalent widths. The redshift confirms that the IRAC [4.5] photometry is very likely dominated by line emission with EW0(OIII+Hbeta)= 720-150+180 A. This detection thus adds to the evidence that extreme rest-frame optical emission lines are a ubiquitous feature of early galaxies promising very efficient spectroscopic follow-up in the future with infrared spectroscopy using JWST and, later, ELTs.
  • The remarkable HST datasets from the CANDELS, HUDF09, HUDF12, ERS, and BoRG/HIPPIES programs have allowed us to map out the evolution of the UV LF from z~10 to z~4. We have identified 5859, 3001, 857, 481, 217, and 6 galaxy candidates at z~4, z~5, z~6, z~7, z~8, and z~10, respectively from the ~1000 arcmin**2 area probed. The selection of z~4-8 galaxies over the five CANDELS fields allows us to assess the cosmic variance; the largest variations are apparent at z>=7. Our new LF determinations at z~4 and z~5 span a 6-mag baseline (-22.5 to -16 AB mag). These determinations agree well with previous estimates, but the larger samples and volumes probed here result in a more reliable sampling of >L* galaxies and allow us to reassess the form of the UV LFs. Our new LF results strengthen our earlier findings to 3.4 sigma significance for a steeper faint-end slope to the UV LF at z>4, with alpha evolving from alpha=-1.64+/-0.04 at z~4 to alpha=-2.06+/-0.13 at z~7 (and alpha = -2.02+/-0.23 at z~8), consistent with that expected from the evolution of the halo mass function. With our improved constraints at the bright end, we find less evolution in the characteristic luminosity M* over the redshift range z~4 to z~7; the observed evolution in the LF is now largely represented by changes in phi*. No evidence for a non-Schechter-like form to the z~4-8 LFs is found. A simple conditional LF model based on halo growth and evolution in the M/L ratio of halos ((1+z)**-1.5) provides a good representation of the observed evolution.
  • We measure the UV-continuum slope beta for over 4000 high-redshift galaxies over a wide range of redshifts z~4-8 and luminosities from the HST HUDF/XDF, HUDF09-1, HUDF09-2, ERS, CANDELS-N, and CANDELS-S data sets. Our new beta results reach very faint levels at z~4 (-15.5 mag: 0.006 L*(z=3)), z~5 (-16.5 mag: 0.014L*(z=3)), and z~6 and z~7 (-17 mag: 0.025 L*(z=3)). Inconsistencies between previous studies led us to conduct a comprehensive review of systematic errors and develop a new technique for measuring beta that is robust against biases that arise from the impact of noise. We demonstrate, by object-by-object comparisons, that all previous studies, including our own and those done on the latest HUDF12 dataset, suffer from small systematic errors in beta. We find that after correcting for the systematic errors (typically d(beta) ~0.1-0.2) all beta results at z~7 from different groups are in excellent agreement. The mean beta we measure for faint (-18 mag: 0.1L*(z=3)) z~4, z~5, z~6, and z~7 galaxies is -2.03+/-0.03+/-0.06 (random and systematic errors), -2.14+/-0.06+/-0.06, -2.24+/-0.11+/-0.08, and -2.30+/-0.18+/-0.13, respectively. Our new beta values are redder than we have reported in the past, but bluer than other recent results. Our previously reported trend of bluer beta's at lower luminosities is confirmed, as is the evolution to bluer beta's at high redshifts. beta appears to show only a mild luminosity dependence faintward of M(UV,AB) ~ -19 mag, suggesting that the mean beta asymptotes to ~ -2.2 to -2.4 for faint z>~4 galaxies. At z~7, the observed beta's suggest non-zero, but low dust extinction, and they agree well with values predicted in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations.
  • Lyman-Break Galaxy (LBG) samples observed during reionization ($z\gtrsim6$) with Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 are reaching sizes sufficient to characterize their clustering properties. Using a combined catalog from the Hubble eXtreme Deep Field and CANDELS surveys, containing $N=743$ LBG candidates at z>6.5 at a mean redshift of $z=7.2$, we detect a clear clustering signal in the angular correlation function (ACF) at $\sim4\sigma$, corresponding to a real-space correlation length $r_{0}=6.7^{+0.9}_{-1.0}h^{-1}$cMpc. The derived galaxy bias $b=8.6^{+0.9}_{-1.0}$ is that of dark-matter halos of $M=10^{11.1^{+0.2}_{-0.3}}$M$_{\odot}$ at $z=7.2$, and highlights that galaxies below the current detection limit ($M_{AB}\sim-17.7$) are expected in lower-mass halos ($M\sim10^{8}-10^{10.5}$M$_{\odot}$). We compute the ACF of LBGs at $z\sim3.8-z\sim5.9$ in the same surveys. A trend of increasing bias is found from $z=3.8$ ($b\sim3.0$) to $z=7.2$ ($b\sim8.6$), broadly consistent with galaxies at fixed luminosity being hosted in dark-matter halos of similar mass at $4<z<6$, followed by a slight rise in halo masses at $z\sim7$ ($\sim2\sigma$ confidence). Separating the data at the median luminosity of the $z=7.2$ sample ($M_{UV}=-19.4$) shows higher clustering at $z=5.9$ for bright galaxies ($r_{0}=5.5^{+1.4}_{-1.5}h^{-1}$cMpc, $b=6.2^{+1.2}_{-1.5}$) compared to faint galaxies ($r_{0}=1.9^{+1.1}_{-1.0}h^{-1}$cMpc, $b=2.7\pm1.2$) implying a constant mass-to-light ratio $\frac{dlogM}{dlogL}\sim1.2^{+1.8}_{-0.8}$. A similar trend is present in the $z=7.2$ sample with larger uncertainty. Finally, our bias measurements allow us to investigate the fraction of dark-matter halos hosting UV-bright galaxies (the duty-cycle, $\epsilon_{DC}$). At $z=7.2$ values near unity are preferred, which may be explained by the shortened halo assembly time at high-redshift.
  • The eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) combines data from ten years of observations with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide-Field Camera 3 Infra-Red (WFC3/IR) into the deepest image of the sky ever in the optical/near-IR. Since the initial observations on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) in 2003, numerous surveys and programs, including supernova followup, HUDF09, CANDELS, and HUDF12 have contributed additional imaging data across the HUDF region. Yet these have never been combined and made available as one complete ultra-deep optical and near-infrared image dataset. We do so now for the eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) program. Our new and improved processing techniques provide higher quality reductions of the total dataset. All WFC3 near-IR and optical ACS data sets have been fully combined and accurately matched, resulting in the deepest imaging ever taken at these wavelengths ranging from 29.1 to 30.3 AB mag (5sigma in a 0.35" diameter aperture) in 9 filters. The gains in the optical for the four filters done in the original ACS HUDF correspond to a typical improvement of 0.15 mag, with gains of 0.25 mag in the deepest areas. Such gains are equivalent to adding ~130 to ~240 orbits of ACS data to the HUDF. Improved processing alone results in a typical gain of ~0.1 mag. Our 5sigma (optical+near-IR) SExtractor catalogs reveal about 14140 sources in the full field and about 7121 galaxies in the deepest part of the XDF (the HUDF09 region). The XDF is the deepest image of the universe ever taken, reaching, in the combined image for a flat f_nu source, to 31.2 AB mag 5sigma (32.9 at 1sigma) in a 0.35" diameter aperture.
  • Growing observational evidence now indicates that nebular line emission has a significant impact on the rest-frame optical fluxes of z~5-7 galaxies observed with Spitzer. This line emission makes z~5-7 galaxies appear more massive, with lower specific star formation rates. However, corrections for this line emission have been very difficult to perform reliably due to huge uncertainties on the overall strength of such emission at z>~5.5. Here, we present the most direct observational evidence yet for ubiquitous high-EW [OIII]+Hbeta line emission in Lyman-break galaxies at z~7, while also presenting a strategy for an improved measurement of the sSFR at z~7. We accomplish this through the selection of bright galaxies in the narrow redshift window z~6.6-7.0 where the IRAC 4.5 micron flux provides a clean measurement of the stellar continuum light. Observed 4.5 micron fluxes in this window contrast with the 3.6 micron fluxes which are contaminated by the prominent [OIII]+Hbeta lines. To ensure a high S/N for our IRAC flux measurements, we consider only the brightest (H_{160}<26 mag) magnified galaxies we have identified in CLASH and other programs targeting galaxy clusters. Remarkably, the mean rest-frame optical color for our bright seven-source sample is very blue, [3.6]-[4.5]=-0.9+/-0.3. Such blue colors cannot be explained by the stellar continuum light and require that the rest-frame EW of [OIII]+Hbeta be greater than 637 Angstroms for the average source. The bluest four sources from our seven-source sample require an even more extreme EW of 1582 Angstroms. Our derived lower limit for the mean [OIII]+Hbeta EW could underestimate the true EW by ~2x based on a simple modeling of the redshift distribution of our sources. We can also set a robust lower limit of >~4 Gyr^-1 on the specific star formation rates based on the mean SED for our seven-source sample. (abridged)
  • Ultra-deep WFC3/IR observations on the HUDF from the HUDF09 program revealed just one plausible z~10 candidate UDFj-39546284. UDFj-39546284 had all the properties expected of a galaxy at z~10 showing (1) no detection in the deep ACS+WFC3 imaging data blueward of the F160W band, exhibiting (2) a blue spectral slope redward of the break, and showing (3) no prominent detection in deep IRAC observations. The new, similarly deep WFC3/IR HUDF12 F160W observations over the HUDF09/XDF allow us to further assess this candidate. These observations show that this candidate, previously only detected at ~5.9 sigma in a single band, clearly corresponds to a real source. It is detected at ~5.3 sigma in the new H-band data and at ~7.8 sigma in the full 85-orbit H-band stack. Interestingly, the non-detection of the source (<1 sigma) in the new F140W observations suggests a higher redshift. Formally, the best-fit redshift of the source utilizing all the WFC3+ACS (and IRAC+K-band) observations is 11.8+/-0.3. However, we consider the z~12 interpretation somewhat unlikely, since the source would either need to be ~20x more luminous than expected or show very high-EW Ly-alpha emission (which seems improbable given the extensive neutral gas prevalent early in the reionization epoch). Lower-redshift solutions fail if only continuum models are allowed. Plausible lower-redshift solutions require that the H-band flux be dominated by line emission such as Halpha or [OIII] with extreme EWs. The tentative detection of line emission at 1.6 microns in UDFj-39546284 in a companion paper suggests that such emission may have already been found.
  • We report the discovery of 33 Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z~8 detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging as part of the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) pure-parallel survey. The ongoing BoRG survey currently has the largest area (274 arcmin^2) with Y_098 (or Y_105), J_125, and H_160 band coverage needed to search for z~8 galaxies, about three times the current CANDELS area, and slightly larger than what will be the final CANDELS wide component with Y_105 data. Our sample of 33 relatively bright Y_098-dropout galaxies have J_125 band magnitudes between 25.5 and 27.4 mag. This is the largest sample of bright (J_125 <~ 27.4) z~8 galaxy candidates presented to date. Combining our dataset with the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF09) dataset, we constrain the rest-frame ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function at z~8 over the widest dynamic range currently available. The combined datasets are well fitted by a Schechter function, i.e. \phi(L) = \phi_* (L/L_*)^{\alpha}\ e^{-(L/L_*)}, without evidence for an excess of sources at the bright end. At 68% confidence, we derive \phi_* = (4.3^{+3.5}_{-2.1}) \times 10^{-4} Mpc^{-3}, M_* = -20.26^{+0.29}_{-0.34}, and a very steep faint-end slope \alpha = -1.98^{+0.23}_{-0.22}. While the best-fit parameters still have a strong degeneracy, especially between \phi_* and M_*, our improved coverage at the bright end has reduced the uncertainty of the faint-end power-law slope at z~8 compared to the best previous determination at +/-0.4. With a future expansion of the BoRG survey, combined with planned ultradeep WFC3/IR observations, it will be possible to further reduce this uncertainty and clearly demonstrate the steepening of the faint-end slope compared to measurements at lower redshift, thereby confirming the key role played by small galaxies in the reionization of the universe.
  • Ultra-deep ACS and WFC3/IR HUDF+HUDF09 data, along with the wide-area GOODS+ERS+CANDELS data over the CDF-S GOODS field, are used to measure UV colors, expressed as the UV-continuum slope beta, of star-forming galaxies over a wide range in luminosity (0.1L*(z=3) to 2L*(z=3)) at high redshift (z~7 to z~4). Beta is measured using all ACS and WFC3/IR passbands uncontaminated by Ly_alpha and spectral breaks. Extensive tests show that our beta measurements are only subject to minimal biases. Using a different selection procedure, Dunlop et al. recently found large biases in their beta measurements. To reconcile these different results, we simulated both approaches and found that beta measurements for faint sources are subject to large biases if the same passbands are used both to select the sources and to measure beta. High-redshift galaxies show a well-defined rest-frame UV color-magnitude (CM) relationship that becomes systematically bluer towards fainter UV luminosities. No evolution is seen in the slope of the UV CM relationship in the first 1.5 Gyr, though there is a small evolution in the zero-point to redder colors from z~7 to z~4. This suggests that galaxies are evolving along a well-defined sequence in the L(UV)-color (beta) plane (a "star-forming sequence"?). Dust appears to be the principal factor driving changes in the UV color (beta) with luminosity. These new larger beta samples lead to improved dust extinction estimates at z~4-7 and confirm that the extinction is still essentially zero at low luminosities and high redshifts. Inclusion of the new dust extinction results leads to (i) excellent agreement between the SFR density at z~4-8 and that inferred from the stellar mass density, and (ii) to higher SSFRs at z>~4, suggesting the SSFR may evolve modestly (by factors of ~2) from z~4-7 to z~2.
  • The HUDF09 data are the deepest near-IR observations ever, reaching to 29.5 mag. Luminosity functions (LF) from these new HUDF09 data for 132 z\sim7 and z\sim8 galaxies are combined with new LFs for z\sim5-6 galaxies and the earlier z\sim4 LF to reach to very faint limits (<0.05 L*(z=3)). The faint-end slopes alpha are steep: -1.79+/-0.12 (z\sim5), -1.73+/-0.20 (z\sim6), -2.01+/-0.21 (z\sim7), and -1.91+/-0.32 (z\sim8). Slopes alpha\lesssim-2 lead to formally divergent UV fluxes, though galaxies are not expected to form below \sim-10 AB mag. These results have important implications for reionization. The weighted mean slope at z\sim6-8 is -1.87+/-0.13. For such steep slopes, and a faint-end limit of -10 AB mag, galaxies provide a very large UV ionizing photon flux. While current results show that galaxies can reionize the universe by z\sim6, matching the Thomson optical depths is more challenging. Extrapolating the current LF evolution to z>8, taking alpha to be -1.87+/-0.13 (the mean value at z\sim6-8), and adopting typical parameters, we derive Thomson optical depths of 0.061_{-0.006}^{+0.009}. However, this result will change if the faint-end slope alpha is not constant with redshift. We test this hypothesis and find a weak, though uncertain, trend to steeper slopes at earlier times (dalpha/dz\sim-0.05+/-0.04), that would increase the Thomson optical depths to 0.079_{-0.017}^{+0.063}, consistent with recent WMAP estimates (tau=0.088+/-0.015). It may thus not be necessary to resort to extreme assumptions about the escape fraction or clumping factor. Nevertheless, the uncertainties remain large. Deeper WFC3/IR+ACS observations can further constrain the ionizing flux from galaxies.
  • We report the discovery of seven strongly lensed Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z~7 detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of Abell 1703. The brightest candidate, called A1703-zD1, has an observed (lensed) magnitude of 24.0 AB (26 sigma) in the WFC3/IR F160W band, making it 0.2 magnitudes brighter than the z_850-dropout candidate recently reported behind the Bullet Cluster and 0.7 magnitudes brighter than the previously brightest known z~7.6 galaxy, A1689-zD1. With a cluster magnification of ~9, this source has an intrinsic magnitude of H_160 = 26.4 AB, a strong z_850 - J_125 break of 1.7 magnitudes, and a photometric redshift of z~6.7. Additionally, we find six other bright LBG candidates with H_160 band magnitudes of 24.9-26.4, photometric redshifts z~6.4 - 8.8, and magnifications mu~3-40. Stellar population fits to the ACS, WFC3/IR, and \Spitzer/IRAC data for A1703-zD1 and A1703-zD4 yield stellar masses (0.7 - 3.0) x 10^{9} M_sun, stellar ages 5-180 Myr, and star-formation rates ~7.8 M_sun/yr, and low reddening with A_V <= 0.7. The source-plane reconstruction of the exceptionally bright candidate A1703-zD1 exhibits an extended structure, spanning ~4 kpc in the z~6.7 source plane, and shows three resolved star-forming knots of radius r~0.4 kpc.
  • Theoretical and numerical modeling of dark-matter halo assembly predicts that the most luminous galaxies at high redshift are surrounded by overdensities of fainter companions. We test this prediction with HST observations acquired by our Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey, which identified four very bright z~8 candidates as Y-dropout sources in four of the 23 non-contiguous WFC3 fields observed. We extend here the search for Y-dropouts to fainter luminosities (M_* galaxies with M_AB\sim-20), with detections at >5sigma confidence (compared to >8sigma confidence adopted earlier) identifying 17 new candidates. We demonstrate that there is a correlation between number counts of faint and bright Y-dropouts at >99.84% confidence. Field BoRG58, which contains the best bright z\sim8 candidate (M_AB=-21.3), has the most significant overdensity of faint Y-dropouts. Four new sources are located within 70arcsec (corresponding to 3.1 comoving Mpc at z=8) from the previously known brighter z\sim8 candidate. The overdensity of Y-dropouts in this field has a physical origin to high confidence (p>99.975%), independent of completeness and contamination rate of the Y-dropout selection. We modeled the overdensity by means of cosmological simulations and estimate that the principal dark matter halo has mass M_h\sim(4-7)x10^11Msun (\sim5sigma density peak) and is surrounded by several M_h\sim10^11Msun halos which could host the fainter dropouts. In this scenario, we predict that all halos will eventually merge into a M_h>2x10^14Msun galaxy cluster by z=0. Follow-up observations with ground and space based telescopes are required to secure the z\sim8 nature of the overdensity, discover new members, and measure their precise redshift.
  • We use the high angular resolution in the near-infrared of the WFC3 on HST to determine YHVz color-color selection criteria to identify and characterize 1.5<z<3.5 galaxies in the HUDF09 and ERS (GOODS-South) fields. The WFC3 NIR images reveal galaxies at these redshifts that were undetected in the rest-frame UV HUDF/GOODS images, as well as true centers and regular disks in galaxies classified as highly irregular in rest-frame UV light. Across the 1.5<z<2.15 redshift range, regular disks are unveiled in the WFC3 images of ~25% of both intermediate and high mass galaxies, i.e., above 10^10 Msun. Meanwhile, galaxies maintaining diffuse and/or irregular morphologies in the rest-frame optical light---i.e., not yet dynamically settled---at these epochs are almost entirely restricted to masses below 10^11 Msun. In contrast at 2.25 < z < 3.5 these diffuse and/or irregular structures overwhelmingly dominate the morphological mix in both the intermediate and high mass regimes, while no regular disks, and only a small fraction (25%) of smooth spheroids, are evident above 10^11 Msun. Strikingly, by 1.5 < z < 2.25 roughly 2 out of every 3 galaxies at the highest masses are spheroids. In our small sample, the fraction of star-forming galaxies at these mass scales decreases concurrently from ~60% to ~5%. If confirmed, this indicates that z~2 is the epoch of both the morphological transformation and quenching of star-formation which assemble the first substantial population of massive ellipticals.
  • We identify 73 z~7 and 59 z~8 candidate galaxies in the reionization epoch, and use this large 26-29.4 AB mag sample of galaxies to derive very deep luminosity functions to <-18 AB mag and the star formation rate density at z~7 and z~8. The galaxy sample is derived using a sophisticated Lyman-Break technique on the full two-year WFC3/IR and ACS data available over the HUDF09 (~29.4 AB mag, 5 sigma), two nearby HUDF09 fields (~29 AB mag, 14 arcmin) and the wider area ERS (~27.5 AB mag) ~40 arcmin**2). The application of strict optical non-detection criteria ensures the contamination fraction is kept low (just ~7% in the HUDF). This very low value includes a full assessment of the contamination from lower redshift sources, photometric scatter, AGN, spurious sources, low mass stars, and transients (e.g., SNe). From careful modelling of the selection volumes for each of our search fields we derive luminosity functions for galaxies at z~7 and z~8 to <-18 AB mag. The faint-end slopes alpha at z~7 and z~8 are uncertain but very steep at alpha = -2.01+/-0.21 and alpha=-1.91+/-0.32, respectively. Such steep slopes contrast to the local alpha<~-1.4 and may even be steeper than that at z~4 where alpha=-1.73+/-0.05. With such steep slopes (alpha<~-1.7) lower luminosity galaxies dominate the galaxy luminosity density during the epoch of reionization. The star formation rate densities derived from these new z~7 and z~8 luminosity functions are consistent with the trends found at later times (lower redshifts). We find reasonable consistency, with the SFR densities implied from reported stellar mass densities, being only ~40% higher at z<7. This suggests that (1) the stellar mass densities inferred from the Spitzer IRAC photometry are reasonably accurate and (2) that the IMF at very high redshift may not be very different from that at later times.
  • We investigate the Spitzer/IRAC properties of 36 z~7 z-dropout galaxies and 3 z~8 Y-dropout galaxies derived from deep/wide-area WFC3/IR data of the Early Release Science, the ultradeep HUDF09, and wide-area NICMOS data. We fit stellar population synthesis models to the SEDs to derive mean redshifts, stellar masses, and ages. The z~7 galaxies are best characterized by substantial ages (>100 Myr) and M/L_V~0.2. The main trend with decreasing luminosity is that of bluing of the far-UV slope from beta~-2.0 to beta~-3.0. This can be explained by decreasing metallicity, except for the lowest luminosity galaxies (0.1 L*{z=3}), where low metallicity and smooth SFHs fail to match the blue far-UV and moderately red H-[3.6] color. Such colors may require episodic SFHs with short periods of activity and quiescence ("on-off" cycles) and/or a contribution from emission lines. The stellar mass of our sample of z~7 star forming galaxies correlates with SFR according to log M* = 8.70 (+-0.09) + 1.06(+-0.10) log SFR, implying star formation may have commenced at z>10. No galaxies are found with SFRs much higher or lower than the past averaged SFR suggesting that the typical star formation timescales are probably a substantial fraction of the Hubble time. We report the first IRAC detection of Y-dropout galaxies at z~8. The average rest-frame U-V=0.3 (AB) of the 3 galaxies are similar to faint z~7 galaxies, implying similar M/L. The stellar mass density to M_{UV,AB}<-18 is rho*(z=8) = 1.8^{+0.7}_{-1.0} x 10^6 M_sun Mpc^-3, following log rho*(z)= 10.6(+-0.6) - 4.4(+-0.7) log(1+z) [M_sun Mpc^-3] over 3<z< 8.