• Interference experiments provide a simple yet powerful tool to unravel fundamental features of quantum physics. Here we engineer an RF-driven, time-dependent bilinear coupling that can be tuned to implement a robust 50:50 beamsplitter between stationary states stored in two superconducting cavities in a three-dimensional architecture. With this, we realize high contrast Hong-Ou- Mandel (HOM) interference between two spectrally-detuned stationary modes. We demonstrate that this coupling provides an efficient method for measuring the quantum state overlap between arbitrary states of the two cavities. Finally, we showcase concatenated beamsplitters and differential phase shifters to implement cascaded Mach-Zehnder interferometers, which can control the signature of the two-photon interference on-demand. Our results pave the way toward implementation of scalable boson sampling, the application of linear optical quantum computing (LOQC) protocols in the microwave domain, and quantum algorithms between long-lived bosonic memories.
  • Controlling quasiparticle dynamics can improve the performance of superconducting devices. For example, it has been demonstrated effective in increasing lifetime and stability of superconducting qubits. Here we study how to optimize the placement of normal-metal traps in transmon-type qubits. When the trap size increases beyond a certain characteristic length, the details of the geometry and trap position, and even the number of traps, become important. We discuss for some experimentally relevant examples how to shorten the decay time of the excess quasiparticle density. Moreover, we show that a trap in the vicinity of a Josephson junction can reduce the steady-state quasiparticle density near that junction, thus suppressing the quasiparticle-induced relaxation rate of the qubit. Such a trap also reduces the impact of fluctuations in the generation rate of quasiparticles, rendering the qubit more stable.
  • We convert propagating qubits encoded as superpositions of zero and one photons to the motion of a micrometer-sized mechanical resonator. Using quantum state tomography, we determine the density matrix of both the propagating photons and the mechanical resonator. By comparing a sufficient set of states before and after conversion, we determine the average process fidelity to be $F_{\textrm{avg}} = 0.83\substack{+0.03-0.06}$ which exceeds the classical bound for the conversion of an arbitrary qubit state. This conversion ability is necessary for using mechanical resonators in emerging quantum communication and modular quantum computation architectures.
  • We present a device demonstrating a lithographically patterned transmon integrated with a micromachined cavity resonator. Our two-cavity, one-qubit device is a multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuit (MMIQC), comprising a basic unit capable of performing circuit-QED (cQED) operations. We describe the qubit-cavity coupling mechanism of a specialized geometry using an electric field picture and a circuit model, and finally obtain specific system parameters using simulations. Fabrication of the MMIQC includes lithography, etching, and metallic bonding of silicon wafers. Superconducting wafer bonding is a critical capability that is demonstrated by a micromachined storage cavity lifetime $34.3~\mathrm{\mu s}$, corresponding to a quality factor of 2 million at single-photon energies. The transmon coherence times are $T_1=6.4~\mathrm{\mu s}$, and $T_2^{Echo}= 11.7~\mathrm{\mu s}$. We measure qubit-cavity dispersive coupling with rate $\chi_{q\mu}/2\pi=-1.17~$MHz, constituting a Jaynes-Cummings system with an interaction strength $g/2\pi=49~$MHz. With these parameters we are able to demonstrate cQED operations in the strong dispersive regime with ease. Finally, we highlight several improvements and anticipated extensions of the technology to complex MMIQCs.
  • We present a method for calculating the energy levels of superconducting circuits that contain highly anharmonic, inductively-shunted modes with arbitrarily strong coupling. Our method starts by calculating the normal modes of the linearized circuit and proceeds with numerical diagonalization in this basis. As an example, we analyze the Hamiltonian of a fluxonium qubit inductively coupled to a readout resonator. While elementary, this simple example is nontrivial because it cannot be efficiently treated by the method known as "black-box quantization," numerical diagonalization in the bare harmonic oscillator basis, or perturbation theory. Calculated spectra are compared to measured spectroscopy data, demonstrating excellent quantitative agreement between theory and experiment.
  • Quantum jumps of a qubit are usually observed between its energy eigenstates, also known as its longitudinal pseudo-spin component. Is it possible, instead, to observe quantum jumps between the transverse superpositions of these eigenstates? We answer positively by presenting the first continuous quantum nondemolition measurement of the transverse component of an individual qubit. In a circuit QED system irradiated by two pump tones, we engineer an effective Hamiltonian whose eigenstates are the transverse qubit states, and a dispersive measurement of the corresponding operator. Such transverse component measurements are a useful tool in the driven-dissipative operation engineering toolbox, which is central to quantum simulation and quantum error correction.
  • Entangling two remote quantum systems which never interact directly is an essential primitive in quantum information science and forms the basis for the modular architecture of quantum computing. When protocols to generate these remote entangled pairs rely on using traveling single photon states as carriers of quantum information, they can be made robust to photon losses, unlike schemes that rely on continuous variable states. However, efficiently detecting single photons is challenging in the domain of superconducting quantum circuits because of the low energy of microwave quanta. Here, we report the realization of a robust form of concurrent remote entanglement based on a novel microwave photon detector implemented in the superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) platform of quantum information. Remote entangled pairs with a fidelity of $0.57\pm0.01$ are generated at $200$ Hz. Our experiment opens the way for the implementation of the modular architecture of quantum computation with superconducting qubits.
  • The presence of quasiparticles in superconducting qubits emerges as an intrinsic constraint on their coherence. While it is difficult to prevent the generation of quasiparticles, keeping them away from active elements of the qubit provides a viable way of improving the device performance. Here we develop theoretically and validate experimentally a model for the effect of a single small trap on the dynamics of the excess quasiparticles injected in a transmon-type qubit. The model allows one to evaluate the time it takes to evacuate the injected quasiparticles from the transmon as a function of trap parameters. With the increase of the trap size, this time decreases monotonically, saturating at the level determined by the quasiparticles diffusion constant and the qubit geometry. We determine the characteristic trap size needed for the relaxation time to approach that saturation value.
  • There are two general requirements to harness the computational power of quantum mechanics: the ability to manipulate the evolution of an isolated system and the ability to faithfully extract information from it. Quantum error correction and simulation often make a more exacting demand: the ability to perform non-destructive measurements of specific correlations within that system. We realize such measurements by employing a protocol adapted from [S. Nigg and S. M. Girvin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 243604 (2013)], enabling real-time selection of arbitrary register-wide Pauli operators. Our implementation consists of a simple circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) module of four highly-coherent 3D transmon qubits, collectively coupled to a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity. As a demonstration, we enact all seven nontrivial subset-parity measurements on our three-qubit register. For each we fully characterize the realized measurement by analyzing the detector (observable operators) via quantum detector tomography and by analyzing the quantum back-action via conditioned process tomography. No single quantity completely encapsulates the performance of a measurement, and standard figures of merit have not yet emerged. Accordingly, we consider several new fidelity measures for both the detector and the complete measurement process. We measure all of these quantities and report high fidelities, indicating that we are measuring the desired quantities precisely and that the measurements are highly non-demolition. We further show that both results are improved significantly by an additional error-heralding measurement. The analyses presented here form a useful basis for the future characterization and validation of quantum measurements, anticipating the demands of emerging quantum technologies.
  • Experimental quantum information processing with superconducting circuits is rapidly advancing, driven by innovation in two classes of devices, one involving planar micro-fabricated (2D) resonators, and the other involving machined three-dimensional (3D) cavities. We demonstrate that circuit quantum electrodynamics can be implemented in a multilayer superconducting structure that combines 2D and 3D advantages. We employ standard micro-fabrication techniques to pattern each layer, and rely on a vacuum gap between the layers to store the electromagnetic energy. Planar qubits are lithographically defined as an aperture in a conducting boundary of the resonators. We demonstrate the aperture concept by implementing an integrated, two cavity-modes, one transmon-qubit system.
  • The remarkable discovery of Quantum Error Correction (QEC), which can overcome the errors experienced by a bit of quantum information (qubit), was a critical advance that gives hope for eventually realizing practical quantum computers. In principle, a system that implements QEC can actually pass a "break-even" point and preserve quantum information for longer than the lifetime of its constituent parts. Reaching the break-even point, however, has thus far remained an outstanding and challenging goal. Several previous works have demonstrated elements of QEC in NMR, ions, nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers, photons, and superconducting transmons. However, these works primarily illustrate the signatures or scaling properties of QEC codes rather than test the capacity of the system to extend the lifetime of quantum information over time. Here we demonstrate a QEC system that reaches the break-even point by suppressing the natural errors due to energy loss for a qubit logically encoded in superpositions of coherent states, or cat states of a superconducting resonator. Moreover, the experiment implements a full QEC protocol by using real-time feedback to encode, monitor naturally occurring errors, decode, and correct. As measured by full process tomography, the enhanced lifetime of the encoded information is 320 microseconds without any post-selection. This is 20 times greater than that of the system's transmon, over twice as long as an uncorrected logical encoding, and 10% longer than the highest quality element of the system (the resonator's 0, 1 Fock states). Our results illustrate the power of novel, hardware efficient qubit encodings over traditional QEC schemes. Furthermore, they advance the field of experimental error correction from confirming the basic concepts to exploring the metrics that drive system performance and the challenges in implementing a fault-tolerant system.
  • Quantum superpositions of distinct coherent states in a single-mode harmonic oscillator, known as "cat states", have been an elegant demonstration of Schrodinger's famous cat paradox. Here, we realize a two-mode cat state of electromagnetic fields in two microwave cavities bridged by a superconducting artificial atom, which can also be viewed as an entangled pair of single-cavity cat states. We present full quantum state tomography of this complex cat state over a Hilbert space exceeding 100 dimensions via quantum non-demolition measurements of the joint photon number parity. The ability to manipulate such multi-cavity quantum states paves the way for logical operations between redundantly encoded qubits for fault-tolerant quantum computation and communication.
  • Circulators and directional amplifiers are crucial non-reciprocal signal routing and processing components involved in microwave readout chains for a variety of applications. They are particularly important in the field of superconducting quantum information, where the devices also need to have minimal photon losses to preserve the quantum coherence of signals. Conventional commercial implementations of each device suffer from losses and are built from very different physical principles, which has led to separate strategies for the construction of their quantum-limited versions. However, as recently proposed theoretically, by establishing simultaneous pairwise conversion and/or gain processes between three modes of a Josephson-junction based superconducting microwave circuit, it is possible to endow the circuit with the functions of either a phase-preserving directional amplifier or a circulator. Here, we experimentally demonstrate these two modes of operation of the same circuit. Furthermore, in the directional amplifier mode, we show that the noise performance is comparable to standard non-directional superconducting amplifiers, while in the circulator mode, we show that the sense of circulation is fully reversible. Our device is far simpler in both modes of operation than previous proposals and implementations, requiring only three microwave pumps. It offers the advantage of flexibility, as it can dynamically switch between modes of operation as its pump conditions are changed. Moreover, by demonstrating that a single three-wave process yields non-reciprocal devices with reconfigurable functions, our work breaks the ground for the development of future, more-complex directional circuits, and has excellent prospects for on-chip integration.
  • Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED). Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this Letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.
  • As experimental quantum information processing (QIP) rapidly advances, an emerging challenge is to design a scalable architecture that combines various quantum elements into a complex device without compromising their performance. In particular, superconducting quantum circuits have successfully demonstrated many of the requirements for quantum computing, including coherence levels that approach the thresholds for scaling. However, it remains challenging to couple a large number of circuit components through controllable channels while suppressing any other interactions. We propose a hardware platform intended to address these challenges, which combines the advantages of integrated circuit fabrication and long coherence times achievable in three-dimensional circuit quantum electrodynamics (3D cQED). This multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuit (MMIQC) platform provides a path toward the realization of increasingly complex superconducting devices in pursuit of a scalable quantum computer.
  • Quantum states can be stabilized in the presence of intrinsic and environmental losses by either applying active feedback conditioned on an ancillary system or through reservoir engineering. Reservoir engineering maintains a desired quantum state through a combination of drives and designed entropy evacuation. We propose and implement a quantum reservoir engineering protocol that stabilizes Fock states in a microwave cavity. This protocol is realized with a circuit quantum electrodynamics platform where a Josephson junction provides direct, nonlinear coupling between two superconducting waveguide cavities. The nonlinear coupling results in a single photon resolved cross-Kerr effect between the two cavities enabling a photon number dependent coupling to a lossy environment. The quantum state of the microwave cavity is discussed in terms of a net polarization and is analyzed by a measurement of its steady state Wigner function.
  • The `Schr\"odinger's cat' thought experiment highlights the counterintuitive facet of quantum theory that entanglement can exist between microscopic and macroscopic systems, producing a superposition of distinguishable states like the fictitious cat that is both alive and dead. The hallmark of entanglement is the detection of strong correlations between systems, for example by the violation of Bell's inequality. Using the CHSH variant of the Bell test, this violation has been observed with photons, atoms, solid state spins, and artificial atoms in superconducting circuits. For larger, more distinguishable states, the conflict between quantum predictions and our classical expectations is typically resolved due to the rapid onset of decoherence. To investigate this reconciliation, one can employ a superposition of coherent states in an oscillator, known as a cat state. In contrast to discrete systems, one can continuously vary the size of the prepared cat state and therefore its dependence on decoherence. Here we demonstrate and quantify entanglement between an artificial atom and a cat state in a cavity, which we call a `Bell-cat' state. We use a circuit QED architecture, high-fidelity measurements, and real-time feedback control to violate Bell's inequality without post-selection or corrections for measurement inefficiencies. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of decoherence by continuously varying the size of created Bell-cat states and characterize the entangled system by joint Wigner tomography. These techniques provide a toolset for quantum information processing with entangled qubits and resonators. While recent results have demonstrated a high level of control of such systems, this experiment demonstrates that information can be extracted efficiently and with high fidelity, a crucial requirement for quantum computing with resonators.
  • Josephson junction parametric amplifiers are playing a crucial role in the readout chain in superconducting quantum information experiments. However, their integration with current 3D cavity implementations poses the problem of transitioning between waveguide, coax cables and planar circuits. Moreover, Josephson amplifiers require auxiliary microwave components, like directional couplers and/or hybrids, that are sources of spurious losses and impedance mismatches that limit measurement efficiency and amplifier tunability. We have developed a new wireless architecture for these parametric amplifiers that eliminates superfluous microwave components and interconnects. This greatly simplifies their assembly and integration into experiments. We present an experimental realization of such a device operating in the $9-11$ GHz band with about $100$ MHz of amplitude gain-bandwidth product, on par with devices mounted in conventional sample holders. The simpler impedance environment presented to the amplifier also results in increased amplifier tunability.
  • Quantum error correction (QEC) is required for a practical quantum computer because of the fragile nature of quantum information. In QEC, information is redundantly stored in a large Hilbert space and one or more observables must be monitored to reveal the occurrence of an error, without disturbing the information encoded in an unknown quantum state. Such observables, typically multi-qubit parities such as <XXXX>, must correspond to a special symmetry property inherent to the encoding scheme. Measurements of these observables, or error syndromes, must also be performed in a quantum non-demolition (QND) way and faster than the rate at which errors occur. Previously, QND measurements of quantum jumps between energy eigenstates have been performed in systems such as trapped ions, electrons, cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, and superconducting qubits. So far, however, no fast and repeated monitoring of an error syndrome has been realized. Here, we track the quantum jumps of a possible error syndrome, the photon number parity of a microwave cavity, by mapping this property onto an ancilla qubit. This quantity is just the error syndrome required in a recently proposed scheme for a hardware-efficient protected quantum memory using Schr\"{o}dinger cat states in a harmonic oscillator. We demonstrate the projective nature of this measurement onto a parity eigenspace by observing the collapse of a coherent state onto even or odd cat states. The measurement is fast compared to the cavity lifetime, has a high single-shot fidelity, and has a 99.8% probability per single measurement of leaving the parity unchanged. In combination with the deterministic encoding of quantum information in cat states realized earlier, our demonstrated QND parity tracking represents a significant step towards implementing an active system that extends the lifetime of a quantum bit.
  • Qubit reset is crucial at the start of and during quantum information algorithms. We present the experimental demonstration of a practical method to force qubits into their ground state, based on driving certain qubit and cavity transitions. Our protocol, called the double drive reset of population is tested on a superconducting transmon qubit in a three-dimensional cavity. Using a new method for measuring population, we show that we can prepare the ground state with a fidelity of at least 99.5 % in less than 3 microseconds; faster times and higher fidelity are predicted upon parameter optimization.
  • Photons are ideal carriers for quantum information as they can have a long coherence time and can be transmitted over long distances. These properties are a consequence of their weak interactions within a nearly linear medium. To create and manipulate nonclassical states of light, however, one requires a strong, nonlinear interaction at the single photon level. One approach to generate suitable interactions is to couple photons to atoms, as in the strong coupling regime of cavity QED systems. In these systems, however, one only indirectly controls the quantum state of the light by manipulating the atoms. A direct photon-photon interaction occurs in so-called Kerr media, which typically induce only weak nonlinearity at the cost of significant loss. So far, it has not been possible to reach the single-photon Kerr regime, where the interaction strength between individual photons exceeds the loss rate. Here, using a 3D circuit QED architecture, we engineer an artificial Kerr medium which enters this regime and allows the observation of new quantum effects. We realize a Gedankenexperiment proposed by Yurke and Stoler, in which the collapse and revival of a coherent state can be observed. This time evolution is a consequence of the quantization of the light field in the cavity and the nonlinear interaction between individual photons. During this evolution non-classical superpositions of coherent states, i.e. multi-component Schroedinger cat states, are formed. We visualize this evolution by measuring the Husimi Q-function and confirm the non-classical properties of these transient states by Wigner tomography. The single-photon Kerr effect could be employed in QND measurement of photons, single photon generation, autonomous quantum feedback schemes and quantum logic operations.
  • In superconducting qubits, the interaction of the qubit degree of freedom with quasiparticles defines a fundamental limitation for the qubit coherence. We develop a theory of the pure dephasing rate \Gamma_{\phi} caused by quasiparticles tunneling through a Josephson junction and of the inhomogeneous broadening due to changes in the occupations of Andreev states in the junction. To estimate \Gamma_{\phi}, we derive a master equation for the qubit dynamics. The tunneling rate of free quasiparticles is enhanced by their large density of states at energies close to the superconducting gap. Nevertheless, we find that \Gamma_{\phi} is small compared to the rates determined by extrinsic factors in most of the current qubit designs (phase and flux qubits, transmon, fluxonium). The split transmon, in which a single junction is replaced by a SQUID loop, represents an exception that could make possible the measurement of \Gamma_{\phi}. Fluctuations of the qubit frequency leading to inhomogeneous broadening may be caused by the fluctuations in the occupation numbers of the Andreev states associated with a phase-biased Josephson junction. This mechanism may be revealed in qubits with small-area junctions, since the smallest relative change in frequency it causes is of the order of the inverse number of transmission channels in the junction.
  • We study the photon shot noise dephasing of a superconducting transmon qubit in the strong-dispersive limit, due to the coupling of the qubit to its readout cavity. As each random arrival or departure of a photon is expected to completely dephase the qubit, we can control the rate at which the qubit experiences dephasing events by varying \textit{in situ} the cavity mode population and decay rate. This allows us to verify a pure dephasing mechanism that matches theoretical predictions, and in fact explains the increased dephasing seen in recent transmon experiments as a function of cryostat temperature. We investigate photon dynamics in this limit and observe large increases in coherence times as the cavity is decoupled from the environment. Our experiments suggest that the intrinsic coherence of small Josephson junctions, when corrected with a single Hahn echo, is greater than several hundred microseconds.
  • Applications in quantum information processing and photon detectors are stimulating a race to produce the highest possible quality factor on-chip superconducting microwave resonators. We have tested the surface-dominated loss hypothesis by systematically studying the role of geometrical parameters on the internal quality factors of compact resonators patterned in Nb on sapphire. Their single-photon internal quality factors were found to increase with the distance between capacitor fingers, the width of the capacitor fingers, and the impedance of the resonator. Quality factors were improved from 210,000 to 500,000 at T = 200 mK. All of these results are consistent with our starting hypothesis.
  • We have engineered the bandgap profile of transmon qubits by combining oxygen-doped Al for tunnel junction electrodes and clean Al as quasiparticle traps to investigate energy relaxation due to quasiparticle tunneling. The relaxation time $T_1$ of the qubits is shown to be insensitive to this bandgap engineering. Operating at relatively low $E_J/E_C$ makes the transmon transition frequency distinctly dependent on the charge parity, allowing us to detect the quasiparticles tunneling across the qubit junction. Quasiparticle kinetics have been studied by monitoring the frequency switching due to even/odd parity change in real time. It shows the switching time is faster than 10 $\mu$s, indicating quasiparticle-induced relaxation has to be reduced to achieve $T_1$ much longer than 100 $\mu$s.