• In this study, we present the investigation of eleven recurring solar jets originated from two different sites (site 1 and site 2) close to each other (~ 11 Mm) in the NOAA active region (AR) 12035 during 15--16 April 2014. The jets were observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescope onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. Two jets were observed by the Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Nainital, India telescope in H-alpha. On 15 April flux emergence is important in site 1 while on 16 April flux emergence and cancellation mechanisms are involved in both sites. The jets of both sites have parallel trajectories and move to the south with a speed between 100 and 360 km/s. We observed some connection between the two sites with some transfer of brightening. The jets of site 2 occurred during the second day and have a tendency to move towards the jets of site 1 and merge with them. We conjecture that the slippage of the jets could be explained by the complex topology of the region with the presence of a few low-altitude null points and many quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), which could intersect with one another.
  • We present here an interesting two-step filament eruption during 14-15 March 2015. The filament was located in NOAA AR 12297 and associated with a halo Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). We use observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Heliospheric Magnetic Imager (HMI) instruments onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO). We also use H-alpha data from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) telescope and the Kanzelhoehe Solar Observatory. The filament shows a first step eruption on 14 March 2015 and it stops its rise at a projected altitude ~ 125 Mm on the solar disk. It remains at this height for ~ 12 hrs. Finally it eruptes on 15 March 2015 and produced a halo CME. We also find jet activity in the active region during both days, which could help the filament de-stabilization and eruption. The decay index is calculated to understand this two-step eruption. The eruption could be due to the presence of successive instability-stability-instability zones as the filament is rising.
  • Solar flares are sudden and violent releases of magnetic energy in the solar atmosphere that can be divided in eruptive flares, when plasma is ejected from the solar atmosphere, resulting in a coronal mass ejection (CME), and confined flares when no CME is associated with the flare. We present a case-study showing the evolution of key topological structures, such as spines and fans which may determine the eruptive versus non-eruptive behavior of the series of eruptive flares, followed by confined flares, which are all originating from the same site. To study the connectivity of the different flux domains and their evolution, we compute a potential magnetic field model of the active region. Quasi-separatrix layers are retrieved from the magnetic field extrapolation. The change of behavior of the flares from one day to the next -eruptive to confined- can be attributed to the change of orientation of the magnetic field below the fan with respect to the orientation of the overlaying spine, rather than an overall change in the stability of the large scale field. Flares tend to be more-and-more confined when the field that supports the filament and the overlying field gradually become less-and-less anti-parallel, as a direct result of changes in the photospheric flux distribution, being themselves driven by continuous shearing motions of the different magnetic flux concentrations.
  • We present the results from our search for HI 21-cm absorption in a sample of 16 strong FeII systems ($W_{\rm r}$(MgII $\lambda2796$) $\ge1.0$ \AA\ and $W_{\rm r}$(FeII $\lambda2600$) or $W_{\rm FeII}$ $\ge1$ \AA) at $0.5<z<1.5$ using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the Green Bank Telescope. We report six new HI 21-cm absorption detections from our sample, which have increased the known number of detections in strong MgII systems at this redshift range by $\sim50$%. Combining our measurements with those in the literature, we find that the detection rate of HI 21-cm absorption increases with $W_{\rm FeII}$, being four times higher in systems with $W_{\rm FeII}$ $\ge1$ \AA\ compared to systems with $W_{\rm FeII}$ $<1$ \AA. The $N$(HI) associated with the HI 21-cm absorbers would be $\ge 2 \times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$, assuming a spin temperature of $\sim500$ K (based on HI 21-cm absorption measurements of damped Lyman-$\alpha$ systems at this redshift range) and unit covering factor. We find that HI 21-cm absorption arises on an average in systems with stronger metal absorption. We also find that quasars with HI 21-cm absorption detected towards them have systematically higher $E(B-V)$ values than those which do not. Further, by comparing the velocity widths of HI 21-cm absorption lines detected in absorption- and galaxy-selected samples, we find that they show an increasing trend (significant at $3.8\sigma$) with redshift at $z<3.5$, which could imply that the absorption originates from more massive galaxy haloes at high-$z$. Increasing the number of HI 21-cm absorption detections at these redshifts is important to confirm various trends noted here with higher statistical significance.
  • We present the results of extensive multi-band intra-night optical monitoring of BL Lacertae during 2010--2012. BL Lacertae was very active in this period and showed intense variability in almost all wavelengths. We extensively observed it for a total for 38 nights; on 26 of them observations were done quasi-simultaneously in B, V, R and I bands (totaling 113 light curves), with an average sampling interval of around 8 minutes. BL Lacertae showed significant variations on hour-like timescales in a total of 19 nights in different optical bands. We did not find any evidence for periodicities or characteristic variability time-scales in the light curves. The intranight variability amplitude is generally greater at higher frequencies and decreases as the source flux increases. We found spectral variations in BL Lacertae in the sense that the optical spectrum becomes flatter as the flux increases but in several flaring states deviates from the linear trend suggesting different jet components contributing to the emission at different times.
  • We report a new double-double radio quasar, DDRQ, J0746$+$4526 which exhibits two cycles of episodic activity. From radio continuum observations at 607 MHz using the GMRT and 1400 MHz from the FIRST survey we confirm its episodic nature. We examine the SDSS optical spectrum and estimate the black hole mass to be (8.2$\pm$0.3)$\times$10$^7$M$_\odot$ from its observed MgII emission line, and the Eddington ratio to be 0.03. The black hole mass is significantly smaller than for the other reported DDRQ, J0935+0204, while the Eddington ratios are comparable. The SDSS spectrum is significantly red continuum dominated suggesting that it is highly obscured with ${E(B-V)}_{host}=0.70\pm0.16$ mag. This high obscuration further indicates the existence of a large quantity of dust and gas along the line of sight, which may have a key role in triggering the recurrent jet activity in such objects.