• We present a simultaneous investigation of coherent spin dynamics in both localized and itinerant carriers in Fe/GaAs heterostructures using ultrafast and spin-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy. We find that for excitation densities that push the transient Fermi energy of photocarriers above the mobility edge there exist two distinct precession frequencies in the ob-served spin dynamics, allowing us to simultaneously monitor both localized and itinerant states. For low magnetic fields (below 3 T) the beat frequency between these two excitations evolves linearly, indicating that the nuclear polarization is saturated almost immediately and that the hyperfine coupling to these two states is comparable, despite the 100x enhancement in nuclear polarization provided by the presence of the Fe layer. At higher magnetic fields (above 3 T) the Zeeman energy drives reentrant localization of the photocarriers. Subtracting the constant hyperfine contribution from both sets of data allows us to extract the Lande g-factor for each state and estimate their energy relative to the bottom of the conduction band, yielding -2.16 meV and 17 meV for localized and itinerant states, respectively. This work advances our fundamental understanding of spin-spin interactions between electron and nuclear spin species, as well as between localized and itinerant electronics states, and therefore has implications for future work in both spintronics and quantum information/computation.
  • We investigate electron spin relaxation in GaAs in the proximity of a Fe/MgO layer using spin-resolved optical pump-probe spectroscopy, revealing a strong dependence of the spin relaxation time on the strength of an exchange-driven hyperfine field. The temperature dependence of this effect reveals a strong correlation with carrier freeze out, implying that at low temperatures the free carrier spin lifetime is dominated by inhomogeneity in the local hyperfine field due to carrier localization. This result resolves a long-standing and contentious question of the origin of the spin relaxation in GaAs at low temperature when a magnetic field is present. Further, this improved fundamental understanding paves the way for future experiments exploring the time-dependent exchange interaction at the ferromagnet/semiconductor interface and its impact on spin dissipation and transport in the regime of dynamically-driven spin pumping.
  • Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on CVD graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth--an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, SQUID, MFM, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.
  • The use of the spin Hall effect and its inverse to electrically detect and manipulate dynamic spin currents generated via ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) driven spin pumping has enabled the investigation of these dynamically injected currents across a wide variety of ferromagnetic materials. However, while this approach has proven to be an invaluable diagnostic for exploring the spin pumping process it requires strong spin-orbit coupling, thus substantially limiting the materials basis available for the detector/channel material (primarily Pt, W and Ta). Here, we report FMR driven spin pumping into a weak spin-orbit channel through the measurement of a spin accumulation voltage in a Si-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) heterostructure. This alternate experimental approach enables the investigation of dynamic spin pumping in a broad class of materials with weak spin-orbit coupling and long spin lifetime while providing additional information regarding the phase evolution of the injected spin ensemble via Hanle-based measurements of the effective spin lifetime.
  • The gradient of the Casimir force between a Si-SiO${}_2$-graphene substrate and an Au-coated sphere is measured by means of a dynamic atomic force microscope operated in the frequency shift technique. It is shown that the presence of graphene leads to up to 9% increase in the force gradient at the shortest separation considered. This is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of an additive theory using the Dirac model of graphene.
  • We investigate the initial growth modes and the role of interfacial electrostatic interactions of EuO epitaxy on MgO(001) by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. A TiO2 interfacial layer is employed to produce high quality epitaxial growth of EuO on MgO(001) with a 45{\deg} in plane rotation. For comparison, direct deposition of EuO on MgO, without the TiO2 layer shows a much slower time evolution in producing a single crystal film. Conceptual arguments of electrostatic repulsion of like-ions are introduced to explain the increased EuO quality at the interface with the TiO2 layer. It is shown that ultrathin EuO films in the monolayer regime can be produced on the TiO2 surface by substrate-supplied oxidation and that such films have bulk-like magnetic properties.
  • We review our recent work on spin injection, transport and relaxation in graphene. The spin injection and transport in single layer graphene (SLG) were investigated using nonlocal magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. Spin injection was performed using either transparent contacts (Co/SLG) or tunneling contacts (Co/MgO/SLG). With tunneling contacts, the nonlocal MR was increased by a factor of ~1000 and the spin injection/detection efficiency was greatly enhanced from ~1% (transparent contacts) to ~30%. Spin relaxation was investigated on graphene spin valves using nonlocal Hanle measurements. For transparent contacts, the spin lifetime was in the range of 50-100 ps. The effects of surface chemical doping showed that for spin lifetimes on the order of 100 ps, impurity scattering (Au) was not the dominant mechanism for spin relaxation. While using tunneling contacts to suppress the contact-induced spin relaxation, we observed the spin lifetimes as long as 771 ps at room temperature, 1.2 ns at 4 K in SLG, and 6.2 ns at 20 K in bilayer graphene (BLG). Furthermore, contrasting spin relaxation behaviors were observed in SLG and BLG. We found that Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation dominated in SLG at low temperatures whereas Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation dominated in BLG at low temperatures. Gate tunable spin transport was studied using the SLG property of gate tunable conductivity and incorporating different types of contacts (transparent and tunneling contacts). Consistent with theoretical predictions, the nonlocal MR was proportional to the SLG conductivity for transparent contacts and varied inversely with the SLG conductivity for tunneling contacts. Finally, bipolar spin transport in SLG was studied and an electron-hole asymmetry was observed for SLG spin valves with transparent contacts...
  • We immerse single layer graphene spin valves into purified water for a short duration (<1 min) and investigate the effect on spin transport. Following water immersion, we observe an enhancement in nonlocal magnetoresistance. Additionally, the enhancement of spin signal is correlated with an increase in junction resistance, which produces an increase in spin injection efficiency. This study provides a simple way to improve the signal magnitude and establishes the robustness of graphene spin valves to water exposure, which enables future studies involving chemical functionalization in aqueous solution.
  • We directly compare the effect of metallic titanium (Ti) and insulating titanium dioxide (TiO2) on the transport properties of single layer graphene. The deposition of Ti results in substantial n-type doping and a reduction of graphene mobility by charged impurity scattering. Subsequent exposure to oxygen largely reduces the doping and scattering by converting Ti into TiO2. In addition, we observe evidence for short-range scattering by TiO2 impurities. These results illustrate the contrasting scattering mechanisms for identical spatial distributions of metallic and insulating adsorbates.
  • The spin dependent properties of epitaxial Fe3O4 thin films on GaAs(001) are studied by the ferromagnetic proximity polarization (FPP) effect and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). Both FPP and MOKE show oscillations with respect to Fe3O4 film thickness, and the oscillations are large enough to induce repeated sign reversals. We attribute the oscillatory behavior to spin-polarized quantum well states forming in the Fe3O4 film. Quantum confinement of the t2g states near the Fermi level provides an explanation for the similar thickness dependences of the FPP and MOKE oscillations.
  • We demonstrate the epitaxial growth of EuO on GaAs by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Thin films are grown in an adsorption-controlled regime with the aid of an MgO diffusion barrier. Despite the large lattice mismatch, it is shown that EuO grows well on MgO(001) with excellent magnetic properties. Epitaxy on GaAs is cube-on-cube and longitudinal magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements demonstrate a large Kerr rotation of 0.57{\deg}, a significant remanent magnetization, and a Curie temperature of 69 K.
  • We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO2 seeded MgO barriers. A non-local magnetoresistance ({\Delta}RNL) of 130 {\Omega} is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating {\Delta}RNL vs. SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene.
  • We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO2 seeded MgO barriers. A non-local magnetoresistance ({\Delta}RNL) of 130 {\Omega} is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating {\Delta}RNL vs. SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene.
  • The effects of surface chemical doping on spin transport in graphene are investigated by performing non-local measurements in ultrahigh vacuum while depositing gold adsorbates. We demonstrate manipulation of the gate-dependent non-local spin signal as a function of gold coverage. We discover that charged impurity scattering is not the dominant mechanism for spin relaxation in graphene, despite its importance for momentum scattering. Finally, unexpected enhancements of the spin lifetime illustrate the complex nature of spin relaxation in graphene.
  • We investigate the effect of gold (Au) atoms in the form of both point-like charged impurities and clusters on the transport properties of graphene. Cryogenic deposition (18 K) of Au decreases the mobility and shifts the Dirac point in a manner that is consistent with scattering from point-like charged impurities. Increasing the temperature to room temperature promotes the formation of clusters, which is verified with atomic force microscopy. We find that for a fixed amount of Au impurities, the formation of clusters enhances the mobility and causes the Dirac point to shift back towards zero.
  • We investigate the effects of transition metals (TM) on the electronic doping and scattering in graphene using molecular beam epitaxy combined with in situ transport measurements. The room temperature deposition of TM onto graphene produces clusters that dope n-type for all TM investigated (Ti, Fe, Pt). We also find that the scattering by TM clusters exhibits different behavior compared to 1/r Coulomb scattering. At high coverage, Pt films are able to produce doping that is either n-type or weakly p-type, which provides experimental evidence for a strong interfacial dipole favoring n-type doping as predicted theoretically.
  • Spin accumulation and spin precession in single-layer graphene are studied by non-local spin valve measurements at room temperature. The dependence of the non-local magnetoresistance on electrode spacing is investigated and the results indicate a spin diffusion length of ~1.6 microns and a spin injection/detection efficiency of 0.013. Electrical detection of the spin precession confirms that the non-local signal originates from spin injection and transport. Fitting of the Hanle spin precession data yields a spin relaxation time of ~84 ps and a spin diffusion length of ~1.5 microns, which is consistent with the value obtained through the spacing dependence.
  • Spin-dependent properties of single-layer graphene (SLG) have been studied by non-local spin valve measurements at room temperature. Gate voltage dependence shows that the non-local magnetoresistance (MR) is proportional to the conductivity of the SLG, which is the predicted behavior for transparent ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic contacts. While the electron and hole bands in SLG are symmetric, gate voltage and bias dependence of the non-local MR reveal an electron-hole asymmetry in which the non-local MR is roughly independent of bias for electrons, but varies significantly with bias for holes.
  • We demonstrate a scheme for optically patterning nuclear spin polarization in semiconductor/ferromagnet heterostructures. A scanning time-resolved Kerr rotation microscope is used to image the nuclear spin polarization that results when GaAs/MnAs epilayers are illuminated with a focused laser having a Gaussian profile. Rather than tracking the intensity profile of the laser spot, these images reveal that the nuclear polarization forms an annular lateral structure having circular symmetry with a dip rather than a peak at its center.
  • Ferromagnetic semiconductors promise the extension of metal-based spintronics into a material system that combines widely tunable electronic, optical, and magnetic properties. Here, we take steps towards realizing that promise by achieving independent control of electronic doping in the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. Samples are comprised of superlattices of 0.5 monolayer (ML) MnAs alternating with 20 ML GaAs and are grown by low temperature (230 C) atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). This allows for the reduction of excess As incorporation and hence the number of charge-compensating As-related defects. We grow a series of samples with either Be or Si doping in the GaAs spacers (p- and n-type dopants, respectively), and verify their structural quality by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex situ x-ray diffraction. Magnetization measurements reveal ferromagnetic behavior over the entire doping range, and show no sign of MnAs precipitates. Finally, magneto-transport shows the giant planar Hall effect and strong (20%) resistance fluctuations that may be related to domain wall motion.
  • We find that photoexcited electrons in an n-GaAs epilayer rapidly (< 50 ps) spin-polarize due to the proximity of an epitaxial ferromagnetic metal. Comparison between MnAs/GaAs and Fe/GaAs structures reveals that this coherent spin polarization is aligned antiparallel and parallel to their magnetizations, respectively. In addition, the GaAs nuclear spins are dynamically polarized with a sign determined by the spontaneous electron spin orientation. In Fe/GaAs, competition between nuclear hyperfine and applied magnetic fields results in complete quenching of electron spin precession.