• Photons, electrons, and their interplay are at the heart of photonic devices and modern instruments for ultrafast science [1-10]. Nowadays, electron beams of the highest intensity and brightness are created by photoemission with short laser pulses, and then accelerated and manipulated using GHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The electron beams are utilized to directly map photoinduced dynamics with ultrafast electron scattering techniques, or further engaged for coherent radiation production at up to hard X-ray wavelengths [11-13]. The push towards improved timing precision between the electron beams and pump optical pulses though, has been stalled at the few tens of femtosecond level, due to technical challenges with synchronizing the high power rf fields with optical sources. Here, we demonstrate attosecond electron metrology using laser-generated single-cycle THz radiation, which is intrinsically phase locked to the optical drive pulses, to manipulate multi-MeV relativistic electron beams. Control and single-shot characterization of bright electron beams at this unprecedented level open up many new opportunities for atomic visualization.
  • Pump-probe electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) with femtosecond temporal resolution will be a transformative research tool for studying non-equilibrium chemistry and electronic dynamics of matter. In this paper, we propose a new concept of femtosecond EELS utilizing mega-electron-volt electron beams from a radio-frequency (rf) photocathode source. The high acceleration gradient and high beam energy of the rf gun are critical to the generation of 10-femtosecond electron beams, which enables improvement of the temporal resolution by more than one order of magnitude beyond the state of the art. The major innovation in our proposal - the `reference-beam technique', relaxes the energy stability requirement on the rf power source by roughly two orders of magnitude. Requirements on the electron beam quality, photocathode, spectrometer and detector are also discussed. Supported by particle-tracking simulations, we demonstrate the feasibility of achieving sub-electron-volt energy resolution and ~10-femtosecond temporal resolution with existing or near-future hardware performances.
  • Instruments to visualize transient structural changes of inhomogeneous materials on the nanometer scale with atomic spatial and temporal resolution are demanded to advance materials science, bioscience, and fusion sciences. One such technique is femtosecond electron microdiffraction, in which a short pulse of electrons with femtosecond-scale duration is focused into a micron-scale spot and used to obtain diffraction images to resolve ultrafast structural dynamics over localized crystalline domain. In this letter, we report the experimental demonstration of time-resolved mega-electron-volt electron microdiffraction which achieves a 5 {\mu}m root-mean-square (rms) beam size on the sample and a 100 fs rms temporal resolution. Using pulses of 10k electrons at 4.2 MeV energy with a normalized emittance 3 nm-rad, we obtained high quality diffraction from a single 10 {\mu}m paraffin (C_44 H_90) crystal. The phonon softening mode in optical-pumped polycrystalline Bi was also time-resolved, demonstrating the temporal resolution limits of our instrument design. This new characterization capability will open many research opportunities in material and biological sciences.
  • We use ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction to disentangle spin-lattice coupling of granular FePt in the time domain. The reduced dimensionality of single-crystalline FePt nanoparticles leads to strong coupling of magnetic order and a highly anisotropic three-dimensional lattice motion characterized by a- and b-axis expansion and c-axis contraction. The resulting increase of the FePt lattice tetragonality, the key quantity determining the energy barrier between opposite FePt magnetization orientations, persists for tens of picoseconds. These results suggest a novel approach to laser-assisted magnetic switching in future data storage applications.
  • Pushing the limits in temporal resolution for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) requires a revolutionary change in the electron source technology. In this paper we study the possibility of employing a radiofrequency photoinjector as the electron source for a time-resolved TEM. By raising the beam energy to the relativistic regime we minimize the space charge effects which otherwise limit the spatio-temporal resolution of the instrument. Analysis and optimization of the system taking into account the achievable beam brightness, electron flux on the sample, chromatic and spherical aberration of the electron optic system, and space charge effects in image formation are presented and supported by detailed numerical modeling. The results demonstrate the feasibility of 10 nanometer - 10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution single-shot MeV TEM.