• Charge ordering (CO) is a phenomenon in which electrons in solids crystallize into a periodic pattern of charge-rich and charge-poor sites owing to strong electron correlations. This usually results in long-range order. In geometrically frustrated systems, however, a glassy electronic state without long-range CO has been observed. We found that a charge-ordered organic material with an isosceles triangular lattice shows charge dynamics associated with crystallization and vitrification of electrons, which can be understood in the context of an energy landscape arising from the degeneracy of various CO patterns. The dynamics suggest that the same nucleation and growth processes that characterize conventional glass-forming liquids guide the crystallization of electrons. These similarities may provide insight into our understanding of the liquid-glass transition.
  • We investigated the electronic states of the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductors $\delta'_{P}$-(BPDT-TTF)$_2$ICl$_2$ and $\delta'_{C}$-(BPDT-TTF)$_2$ICl$_2$, both of which are insulating at room temperature owing to strong electron correlations. Through measurements of electrical resistivity, optical conductivity, and magnetic susceptibility, as well as band-structure calculations, we have revealed that the two materials possess completely different ground states, even though they have the same chemical composition and stacking configuration of the donor molecules. We have found that the $\delta_P'$-type salt with an effective half-filled band behaves as a dimer-Mott (DM) insulator and exhibits a nonmagnetic transition at 25 K, whereas the $\delta'_C$-type salt with a 3/4-filled band shows a charge ordering (CO) transition just above room temperature and becomes nonmagnetic below 20 K. The optical spectra of the $\delta_P'$-type salt are composed of two characteristic bands due to intra- and interdimer charge transfers, supporting the DM insulating behavior arising from the strong on-site Coulomb interaction. By contrast, in the $\delta'_C$-type salt, a single band characterizing the formation of CO arising from the off-site Coulomb interactions is observed. Upon lowering the temperature, the shape of the optical spectra in the $\delta_C'$-type salt becomes asymmetric and shifts to much lower frequencies, suggesting the emergence of domain-wall excitations with fractional charges expected in a one-dimensional CO chain. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of the $\delta_P'$-type salt is well described by a 2D spin-1/2 Heisenberg AFM model on an anisotropic square lattice in the dimerized picture, while in the $\delta_C'$-type salt, it can be explained by a 2D spin-1/2 Heisenberg AFM model on an anisotropic honeycomb lattice formed in the CO state.
  • Strongly enhanced quantum fluctuations often lead to a rich variety of quantum-disordered states. A representative case is liquid helium, in which zero-point vibrations of the helium atoms prevent its solidification at low temperatures. A similar behaviour is found for the internal degrees of freedom in electrons. Among the most prominent is a quantum spin liquid (QSL), in which localized spins are highly correlated but fluctuate even at absolute zero. Recently, a coupling of spins with other degrees of freedom has been proposed as an innovative approach to generate even more fascinating QSLs such as orbital--spin liquids. However, such ideas are limited to the internal degrees of freedom in electrons. Here, we demonstrate that a coupling of localized spins with the zero-point motion of hydrogen atoms (proton fluctuations) in a hydrogen-bonded organic Mott insulator provides a new class of QSLs. We find that a divergent dielectric behaviour towards a hydrogen-bond order is suppressed by the quantum proton fluctuations, resulting in a quantum paraelectric (QPE) state. Furthermore, our thermal-transport measurements reveal that a QSL state with gapless spin excitations rapidly emerges upon entering the QPE state. These findings indicate that the quantum proton fluctuations give rise to a novel QSL --- a quantum-disordered state of magnetic and electric dipoles --- through the coupling between the electron and proton degrees of freedom.
  • The physics of the crossover between weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and strong-coupling Bose-Einstein-condensate (BEC) limits gives a unified framework of quantum bound (superfluid) states of interacting fermions. This crossover has been studied in the ultracold atomic systems, but is extremely difficult to be realized for electrons in solids. Recently, the superconducting semimetal FeSe with a transition temperature $T_{\rm c}=8.5$ K has been found to be deep inside the BCS-BEC crossover regime. Here we report experimental signatures of preformed Cooper pairing in FeSe below $T^*\sim20$ K, whose energy scale is comparable to the Fermi energies. In stark contrast to usual superconductors, large nonlinear diamagnetism by far exceeding the standard Gaussian superconducting fluctuations is observed below $T^*\sim20$ K, providing thermodynamic evidence for prevailing phase fluctuations of superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transport data give evidence of pseudogap formation at $\sim T^*$. The multiband superconductivity along with electron-hole compensation in FeSe may highlight a novel aspect of the BCS-BEC crossover physics.
  • To elucidate the pressure evolution of the electronic structure in an antiferromagnetic dimer-Mott (DM) insulator ${\beta}^{\prime}$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2$ICl$_2$, which exhibits superconductivity at 14.2 K under 8 GPa, we measured the polarized infrared (IR) optical spectra under high pressure. At ambient pressure, two characteristic bands due to intra- and interdimer charge transfers have been observed in the IR spectra, supporting that this salt is a typical half-filled DM insulator at ambient pressure. With increasing pressure, however, the intradimer charge transfer excitation shifts to much lower energies, indicating that the effective electronic state changes from half-filled to 3/4-filled as a result of weakening of dimerization. This implies that the system approaches a charge-ordered state under high pressure, in which charge degrees of freedom emerge as an important factor. The present results suggest that charge fluctuation inside of dimers plays an important role in the high-temperature superconductivity.
  • We investigate the electronic reconstruction across the tetragonal-orthorhombic structural transition in FeSe by employing polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on detwinned single crystals. Across the structural transition, the electronic structures around the G and M points are modified from four-fold to two-fold symmetry due to the lifting of degeneracy in dxz/dyz orbitals. The dxz band shifts upward at the G point while it moves downward at the M point, suggesting that the electronic structure of orthorhombic FeSe is characterized by a momentum-dependent sign-changing orbital polarization. The elongated directions of the elliptical Fermi surfaces (FSs) at the G and M points are rotated by 90 degrees with respect to each other, which may be related to the absence of the antiferromagnetic order in FeSe.
  • By using a molecular beam epitaxy technique, we fabricate a new type of superconducting superlattices with controlled atomic layer thicknesses of alternating blocks between heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn_5, which exhibits a strong Pauli pair-breaking effect, and nonmagnetic metal YbCoIn_5. The introduction of the thickness modulation of YbCoIn_5 block layers breaks the inversion symmetry centered at the superconducting block of CeCoIn_5. This configuration leads to dramatic changes in the temperature and angular dependence of the upper critical field, which can be understood by considering the effect of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction arising from the inversion symmetry breaking and the associated weakening of the Pauli pair-breaking effect. Since the degree of thickness modulation is a design feature of this type of superlattices, the Rashba interaction and the nature of pair-breaking are largely tunable in these modulated superlattices with strong spin-orbit coupling.
  • We find a characteristic low-energy peak structure located in the range of 100-300 cm$^{-1}$ in the optical conductivity spectra of a quasi-two-dimensional organic compound with a triangular lattice, ${\theta}$-$\mbox{(BEDT-TTF)}_2\mbox{CsZn(SCN)}_4$, in which two different types of short-range charge orderings (COs) coexist. Upon lowering the temperature, the low-energy peak becomes significant and shifts to much lower frequencies only for the polarization of ${E \parallel a}$, in contrast to the other broad electronic bands in the mid-infrared region. On introducing disorder, the low-energy peak is strongly suppressed in comparison with the broad electronic bands. This result indicates that the low-energy peak is attributed to a collective excitation that originates from the short-range CO with a relatively long-period $3\times3$ pattern. The present results shed light on the understanding of the low-energy excitation in the glassy electronic state, where the charge degrees of freedom remain at low temperatures.
  • We have succeeded in growing single crystals of orthorhombic CeT2Al10 (T=Fe, Ru, Os) by Al self-flux method for the first time, and measured the electrical resistivity at pressures up to 8 GPa, the magnetic susceptibility and specific heat at ambient pressure. These results indicate that CeT2Al10 belongs to the heavy fermion compounds. CeRu2Al10 and CeOs2Al10 show a similar phase transition at T0 = 27.3 and 28.7 K, respectively. The temperature dependences in the ordered phases are well described by the thermally activated form, suggesting that partial gap opens over the Fermi surfaces below T0. When pressure is applied to CeRu2Al10, T0 disappears suddenly between 3 and 4 GPa, and CeRu2Al10 turns into a Kondo insulator, followed by a metal. The similarity of CeT2Al10 under respective pressures suggests a scaling relation by some parameter controlling the unusual physics in these compounds.
  • We refine Osserman's argument on the exceptional values of the Gauss map of algebraic minimal surfaces. This gives an effective estimate for the number of exceptional values and the totally ramified value number for a wider class of complete minimal surfaces that includes algebraic minimal surfaces. It also provides a new proof of Fujimoto's theorem for this class, which not only simplifies the proof but also reveals the geometric meaning behind it.
  • Given two spherically symmetric and short range potentials $V_0$ and V_1 for which the radial Schrodinger equation can be solved explicitely at zero energy, we show how to construct a new potential $V$ for which the radial equation can again be solved explicitely at zero energy. The new potential and its corresponding wave function are given explicitely in terms of V_0 and V_1, and their corresponding wave functions \phi_0 and \phi_1. V_0 must be such that it sustains no bound states (either repulsive, or attractive but weak). However, V_1 can sustain any (finite) number of bound states. The new potential V has the same number of bound states, by construction, but the corresponding (negative) energies are, of course, different. Once this is achieved, one can start then from V_0 and V, and construct a new potential \bar{V} for which the radial equation is again solvable explicitely. And the process can be repeated indefinitely. We exhibit first the construction, and the proof of its validity, for regular short range potentials, i.e. those for which rV_0(r) and rV_1(r) are L^1 at the origin. It is then seen that the construction extends automatically to potentials which are singular at r= 0. It can also be extended to V_0 long range (Coulomb, etc.). We give finally several explicit examples.
  • The variable phase approach to potential scattering with regular spherically symmetric potentials satisfying (\ref{1e}), and studied by Calogero in his book$^{5}$, is revisited, and we show directly that it gives the absolute definition of the phase-shifts, i.e. the one which defines $\delta_{\ell}(k)$ as a continuous function of $k$ for all $k \geq 0$, up to infinity, where $\delta_{\ell}(\infty)=0$ is automatically satisfied. This removes the usual ambiguity $\pm n \pi$, $n$ integer, attached to the definition of the phase-shifts through the partial wave scattering amplitudes obtained from the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation, or via the phase of the Jost functions. It is then shown rigorously, and also on several examples, that this definition of the phase-shifts is very general, and applies as well to all potentials which have a strong repulsive singularity at the origin, for instance those which behave like $gr^{-m}$, $g > 0$, $m \geq 2$, etc. We also give an example of application to the low-energy behaviour of the $S$-wave scattering amplitude in two dimensions, which leads to an interesting result.
  • It is shown that for the Calogero-Cohn type upper bounds on the number of bound states of a negative spherically symmetric potential $V(r)$, in each angular momentum state, that is, bounds containing only the integral $\int^\infty_0 |V(r)|^{1/2}dr$, the condition $V'(r) \geq 0$ is not necessary, and can be replaced by the less stringent condition $(d/dr)[r^{1-2p}(-V)^{1-p}] \leq 0, 1/2 \leq p < 1$, which allows oscillations in the potential. The constants in the bounds are accordingly modified, depend on $p$ and $\ell$, and tend to the standard value for $p = 1/2$.
  • Nuclear modification of the structure function $F_3$ is investigated. Although it could be estimated in the medium and large $x$ regions from the nuclear structure function $F_2^A$, it is essentially unknown at small $x$. The nuclear structure function $F_3^A$ at small $x$ is investigated in two different theoretical models: a parton-recombination model with $Q^2$ rescaling and an aligned-jet model. We find that these models predict completely different behavior at small $x$: {\it antishadowing} in the first parton model and {\it shadowing} in the aligned-jet model. Therefore, studies of the ratio $F_3^A/F_3^D$ at small $x$ could be useful in discriminating among different models, which produce similar shadowing behavior in the structure function $F_2$. We also estimate currently acceptable nuclear modification of $F_3$ at small $x$ by using $F_2^A/F_2^D$ experimental data and baryon-number conservation.
  • We discuss numerical solution of Altarelli-Parisi equations in a Laguerre-polynomial method and in a brute-force method. In the Laguerre method, we get good accuracy by taking about twenty Laguerre polynomials in the flavor-nonsinglet case. Excellent evolution results are obtained in the singlet case by taking only ten Laguerre polynomials. The accuracy becomes slightly worse in the small and large $x$ regions, especially in the nonsinglet case. These problems could be implemented by using the brute-force method; however, running CPU time could be significantly longer than the one in the Laguerre method.
  • We investigate a numerical solution of the flavor-nonsinglet Altarelli-Parisi equation with next-to-leading-order $\alpha_s$ corrections by using Laguerre polynomials. Expanding a structure function (or a quark distribution) and a splitting function by the Laguerre polynomials, we reduce an integrodifferential equation to a summation of finite number of Laguerre coefficients. We provide a FORTRAN program for Q$^2$ evolution of nonsinglet structure functions (F$_1$, F$_2$, and F$_3$) and nonsinglet quark distributions. This is a very effective program with typical running time of a few seconds on SUN-IPX or on VAX-4000/500. Accurate evolution results are obtained by taking approximately twenty Laguerre polynomials.