• EFOSC2 (the European Southern Observatory Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera v2) is one of the workhorse instruments on ESO's New Technology Telescope (NTT), and is one of the most popular instruments at La Silla observatory. It is mounted at a Nasmyth focus, and therefore exhibits strong, wavelength and pointing-direction dependent instrumental polarisation. In this document we describe our efforts to calibrate the broadband imaging polarimetry mode, and provide a calibration for broadband B, V, R filters to a level that satisfies most use cases (i.e. polarimetric calibration uncertainty ~0.1%). We make our calibration codes public. This calibration effort can be used to enhance the yield of future polarimetric programmes with EFOSC2, by allowing good calibration with a greatly reduced number of standard star observations. Similarly, our calibration model can be combined with archival calibration observations to post-process data taken in past years, to form a EFOSC2 legacy archive with substantial scientific potential.
  • The merger of two dense stellar remnants including at least one neutron star (NS) is predicted to produce gravitational waves (GWs) and short duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs). In the process, neutron-rich material is ejected from the system and heavy elements are synthesized by r-process nucleosynthesis. The radioactive decay of these heavy elements produces additional transient radiation termed "kilonova" or "macronova". We report the detection of linear optical polarization P = (0.50 +/- 0.07)% at 1.46 days after detection of the GWs from GW170817, a double neutron star merger associated with an optical macronova counterpart and a short GRB. The optical emission from a macronova is expected to be characterized by a blue, rapidly decaying, component and a red, more slowly evolving, component due to material rich of heavy elements, the lanthanides. The polarization measurement was made when the macronova was still in its blue phase, during which there is an important contribution from a lanthanide-free outflow. The low degree of polarization is consistent with intrinsically unpolarized emission scattered by Galactic dust, suggesting a symmetric geometry of the emitting region and low inclination of the merger system. Stringent upper limits to the polarization degree from 2.45 - 9.48 days post-burst are consistent with the lanthanides-rich macronova interpretation.
  • We explore the potential of INTEGRAL to improve our understanding of the low fluence regime for explosive transients, such as GRBs. We probe the nature of the so-called "WEAK" INTEGRAL triggers, when the gamma-ray instruments record intensity spikes that are below the usual STRONG significance thresholds. In a targeted Swift follow-up campaign, we observed 15 WEAK triggers. We find six of these can be classified as GRBs. This includes GRB150305A, a GRB discovered from our campaign alone. We also identified a source coincident with one trigger, IGRW151019, as a candidate AGN. We show that real events such as GRBs exist within the IBAS WEAK trigger population. A comparison of the fluence distributions of the full INTEGRAL IBAS and Swift BAT GRB samples showed that the two are similar. We also find correlations between the prompt gamma-ray and X-ray properties of the two samples, supporting previous investigations. We find that both satellites reach similar, low fluence levels regularly, although Swift is more sensitive to short, low fluence GRBs.
  • We present optical spectroscopy of candidate AGN pinpointed by a Swift follow-up campaign on unidentified transients in the XMM-Newton Slew Survey, increasing the completeness of the identifications of AGN in the Survey. Our Swift follow-up campaign identified 17 XRT-detected candidate AGN, of which nine were selected for optical follow-up and a further two were confirmed as AGN elsewhere. Using data obtained at the William Herschel Telescope, Very Large Telescope and New Technology Telescope, we find AGN features in seven of the candidates. We classify six as Seyfert types 1.0 to 1.5, with broad-line region velocities spanning 2000--12000 km s$^{-1}$, and identify one as a possible Type II AGN, consistent with the lack of a soft band X-ray detection in the Slew Survey. The Virial black hole mass estimates for the sample lie between 1$\times$10$^{8}$ M$_{\odot}$ and 3$\times$10$^9$ M$_{\odot}$, with one source likely emitting close to its Eddington rate, $L_{\rm Bol}/L_{\rm Edd} \sim 0.9$. We find a wide redshift range of $0.08<z<0.9$ for the nine now confirmed AGN drawn from the unidentified Slew Survey sample. One source remaining unclassified shows outbursts rarely seen before in AGN. We conclude that AGN discovered in this way are consistent with the largely non-varying, Slew-selected, known AGN population. We also find parallels with XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey AGN selected from pointed observations, and postulate that shallow X-ray surveys select AGN drawn from the same populations that have been characterised in deeper X-ray selected samples.
  • We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/F160W SNAPSHOT sur- vey of the host galaxies of 39 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) at z < 3. We have non-detections of hosts at the locations of 4 bursts. Sufficient accuracy to as- trometrically align optical afterglow images and determine the location of the LGRB within its host was possible for 31/35 detected hosts. In agreement with other work, we find the luminosity distribution of LGRB hosts is significantly fainter than that of a star formation rate-weighted field galaxy sample over the same redshift range, indicating LGRBs are not unbiasedly tracing the star formation rate. Morphologi- cally, the sample of LGRB hosts are dominated by spiral-like or irregular galaxies. We find evidence for evolution of the population of LGRB hosts towards lower-luminosity, higher concentrated hosts at lower redshifts. Their half-light radii are consistent with other LGRB host samples where measurements were made on rest-frame UV obser- vations. In agreement with recent work, we find their 80 per cent enclosed flux radii distribution to be more extended than previously thought, making them intermedi- ate between core-collapse supernova (CCSN) and super-luminous supernova (SLSN) hosts. The galactocentric projected-offset distribution confirms LGRBs as centrally concentrated, much more so than CCSNe and similar to SLSNe. LGRBs are strongly biased towards the brighter regions in their host light distributions, regardless of their offset. We find a correlation between the luminosity of the LGRB explosion site and the intrinsic column density, N_H , towards the burst.
  • Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) allow us to pinpoint and study star-forming galaxies in the early universe, thanks to their orders of magnitude brighter peak luminosities compared to other astrophysical sources, and their association with deaths of massive stars. We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 detections of three Swift GRB host galaxies lying at redshifts $z = 5.913$ (GRB 130606A), $z = 6.295$ (GRB 050904), and $z = 6.327$ (GRB 140515A) in the F140W (wide-$JH$ band, $\lambda_{\rm{obs}}\sim1.4\,\mu m$) filter. The hosts have magnitudes (corrected for Galactic extinction) of $m_{\rm{\lambda_{obs},AB}}= 26.34^{+0.14}_{-0.16}, 27.56^{+0.18}_{-0.22},$ and $28.30^{+0.25}_{-0.33}$ respectively. In all three cases the probability of chance coincidence of lower redshift galaxies is $\lesssim2\,\%$, indicating that the detected galaxies are most likely the GRB hosts. These are the first detections of high redshift ($z > 5$) GRB host galaxies in emission. The galaxies have luminosities in the range $0.1-0.6\,L^{*}_{z=6}$ (with $M_{1600}^{*}=-20.95\pm0.12$), and half-light radii in the range $0.6-0.9\,\rm{kpc}$. Both their half-light radii and luminosities are consistent with existing samples of Lyman-break galaxies at $z\sim6$. Spectroscopic analysis of the GRB afterglows indicate low metallicities ($[\rm{M/H}]\lesssim-1$) and low dust extinction ($A_{\rm{V}}\lesssim0.1$) along the line of sight. Using stellar population synthesis models, we explore the implications of each galaxy's luminosity for its possible star formation history, and consider the potential for emission-line metallicity determination with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope.
  • We present the first reported case of the simultaneous metallicity determination of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy, from both afterglow absorption lines as well as strong emission-line diagnostics. Using spectroscopic and imaging observations of the afterglow and host of the long-duration Swift GRB121024A at z = 2.30, we give one of the most complete views of a GRB host/environment to date. We observe a strong damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA) with a hydrogen column density of log N(HI) = 21.88 +/- 0.10, H2 absorption in the Lyman-Werner bands (molecular fraction of log(f)~ -1.4; fourth solid detection of molecular hydrogen in a GRB-DLA), the nebular emission lines H-alpha, H-beta, [O II], [O III] and [N II], as well as metal absorption lines. We find a GRB host galaxy that is highly star-forming (SFR ~ 40 solar masses/yr ), with a dust-corrected metallicity along the line of sight of [Zn/H]corr = -0.6 +/- 0.2 ([O/H] ~ -0.3 from emission lines), and a depletion factor [Zn/Fe] = 0.85 +/- 0.04. The molecular gas is separated by 400 km/s (and 1-3 kpc) from the gas that is photoexcited by the GRB. This implies a fairly massive host, in agreement with the derived stellar mass of log(M/M_solar ) = 9.9+/- 0.2. We dissect the host galaxy by characterising its molecular component, the excited gas, and the line-emitting star-forming regions. The extinction curve for the line of sight is found to be unusually flat (Rv ~15). We discuss the possibility of an anomalous grain size distributions. We furthermore discuss the different metallicity determinations from both absorption and emission lines, which gives consistent results for the line of sight to GRB 121024A.
  • The lenticular galaxy ESO 243-49 hosts the ultraluminous X-ray source HLX-1, the best candidate intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) currently known. The environments of IMBHs remain unknown, however the proposed candidates include the nuclei of dwarf galaxies or globular clusters. Evidence at optical wavelengths points at HLX-1 being the remnant of an accreted dwarf galaxy. Here we report the Australia Telescope Compact Array radio observations of HI emission in and around ESO 243-49 searching for signatures of a recent merger event. No HI line emission is detected in ESO 243-49 with a 5$\sigma$ upper limit on the HI gas mass of a few $10^8 M_{\odot}$. A likely reason for this non-detection is the cluster environment depleting ESO 243-49's HI gas reservoir. The upper limit is consistent with an interpretation of HLX-1 as a dwarf satellite of ESO 243-49, however more sensitive observations are required for a detection. We detect ~$5 \times 10^8 M_{\odot}$ of HI gas in the peculiar spiral galaxy AM 0108-462, located at a projected distance of ~170 kpc from ESO 243-49. This amount of HI gas is ~10 times less than in spiral galaxies with similar optical and near-infrared properties in the field, strengthening the conclusion that the cluster environment indeed depletes the HI gas reservoir of these two galaxies. Here we also report observations of AM 0108-462 in several optical and near-infrared bands using the Magellan 6.5 m telescopes, and archival X-ray and ultraviolet observations with XMM-Newton and Swift. These data combined with the HI line data suggest it is likely that AM 0108-462 is experiencing a merger event.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet, when measured minutes after the burst, and the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after burst in GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and negligable circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blastwave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized optical light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets.
  • Cosmic explosions dissipate energy into their surroundings on a very wide range of time-scales: producing shock waves and associated particle acceleration. The historical culprits for the acceleration of the bulk of Galactic cosmic rays are supernova remnants: explosions on ~10000 year time-scales. Increasingly however, time-variable emission points to rapid and efficient particle acceleration in a range of different astrophysical systems. Gamma-ray bursts have the shortest time-scales, with inferred bulk Lorentz factors of ~1000 and photons emitted beyond 100 GeV, but active galaxies, pulsar wind nebulae and colliding stellar winds are all now associated with time-variable emission at ~TeV energies. Cosmic photons and neutrinos at these energies offer a powerful probe of the underlying physical mechanisms of cosmic explosions, and a tool for exploring fundamental physics with these systems. Here we discuss the motivations for high-energy observations of transients, the current experimental situation, and the prospects for the next decade, with particular reference to the major next-generation high-energy observatory CTA.
  • The association of Type Ic SNe with long-duration GRBs is well established. We endeavor, through accurate ground-based observational campaigns, to characterize these SNe at increasingly high redshifts. We obtained a series of optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the Type Ic SN2012bz associated with the Swift long-duration GRB120422A (z=0.283) using the 3.6-m TNG and the 8.2-m VLT telescopes. The peak times of the light curves of SN2012bz in various optical filters differ, with the B-band and i'-band light curves reaching maximum at ~9 and ~23 rest-frame days, respectively. The bolometric light curve has been derived from individual bands photometric measurements, but no correction for the unknown contribution in the near-infrared (probably around 10-15%) has been applied. Therefore, the present light curve should be considered as a lower limit to the actual UV-optical-IR bolometric light curve. This pseudo-bolometric curve reaches its maximum (Mbol = -18.56 +/- 0.06) at 13 +/- 1 rest-frame days; it is similar in shape and luminosity to the bolometric light curves of the SNe associated with z<0.2 GRBs and more luminous than those of SNe associated with XRFs. A comparison with the model generated for the bolometric light curve of SN2003dh suggests that SN2012bz produced only about 15% less 56Ni than SN2003dh, about 0.35 Msol. Similarly the VLT spectra of SN2012bz, after correction for Galactic extinction and for the contribution of the host galaxy, suggest comparable explosion parameters with those observed in SN2003dh (EK~3.5 x 10^52 erg, Mej~7 Msol) and a similar progenitor mass (~25-40 Msol). GRB120422A is consistent with the Epeak-Eiso and the EX,iso-Egamma,iso-E_peak relations. GRB120422A/SN2012bz shows the GRB-SN connection at the highest redshift so far accurately monitored both photometrically and spectroscopically.
  • In several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) excess emission, in addition to the standard synchrotron afterglow spectrum, has been discovered in the early time X-ray observations. It has been proposed that this excess comes from black body emission, which may be related to the shock break-out of a supernova in the GRBs progenitor star. This hypothesis is supported by the discovery of excess emission in several GRBs with an associated supernova. Using mock spectra we show that it is only likely to detect such a component, similar to the one proposed in GRB 101219B, at low redshift and in low absorption environments. We also perform a systematic search for black body components in all the GRBs observed with the Swift satellite and find six bursts (GRB 061021, 061110A, 081109, 090814A, 100621A and 110715A) with possible black body components. Under the assumption that their excess emission is due to a black body component we present radii, temperatures and luminosities of the emitting components. We also show that detection of black body components only is possible in a fraction of the Swift bursts.
  • The X-ray spectra of Gamma-Ray Bursts can generally be described by an absorbed power law. The landmark discovery of thermal X-ray emission in addition to the power law in the unusual GRB 060218, followed by a similar discovery in GRB 100316D, showed that during the first thousand seconds after trigger the soft X-ray spectra can be complex. Both the origin and prevalence of such spectral components still evade understanding, particularly after the discovery of thermal X-ray emission in the classical GRB 090618. Possibly most importantly, these three objects are all associated with optical supernovae, begging the question of whether the thermal X-ray components could be a result of the GRB-SN connection, possibly in the shock breakout. We therefore performed a search for blackbody components in the early Swift X-ray spectra of 11 GRBs that have or may have associated optical supernovae, accurately recovering the thermal components reported in the literature for GRBs 060218, 090618 and 100316D. We present the discovery of a cooling blackbody in GRB 101219B/SN2010ma, and in four further GRB-SNe we find an improvement in the fit with a blackbody which we deem possible blackbody candidates due to case-specific caveats. All the possible new blackbody components we report lie at the high end of the luminosity and radius distribution. GRB 101219B appears to bridge the gap between the low-luminosity and the classical GRB-SNe with thermal emission, and following the blackbody evolution we derive an expansion velocity for this source of order 0.4c. We discuss potential origins for the thermal X-ray emission in our sample, including a cocoon model which we find can accommodate the more extreme physical parameters implied by many of our model fits.
  • We present late-time Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the fields of six Swift GRBs lying at 5.0<z<9.5. Our data includes very deep observations of the field of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed burst, GRB 090423, at z=8.2. Using the precise positions afforded by their afterglows we can place stringent limits on the luminosities of their host galaxies. In one case, that of GRB 060522 at z=5.11, there is a marginal excess of flux close to the GRB position which may be a detection of a host at a magnitude J(AB)=28.5. None of the others are significantly detected meaning that all the hosts lie below L\star at their respective redshifts, with star formation rates SFR<4Mo/yr in all cases. Indeed, stacking the five fields with WFC3-IR data we conclude a mean SFR<0.17Mo/yr per galaxy. These results support the proposition that the bulk of star formation, and hence integrated UV luminosity, at high redshifts arises in galaxies below the detection limits of deep-field observations. Making the reasonable assumption that GRB rate is proportional to UV luminosity at early times allows us to compare our limits with expectations based on galaxy luminosity functions derived from the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) and other deep fields. We infer that a luminosity function which is evolving rapidly towards steeper faint-end slope (alpha) and decreasing characteristic luminosity (L\star), as suggested by some other studies, is consistent with our observations, whereas a non-evolving LF shape is ruled out at >90% confidence. Although it is not yet possible to make stronger statements, in the future, with larger samples and a fuller understanding of the conditions required for GRB production, studies like this hold great potential for probing the nature of star formation, the shape of the galaxy luminosity function, and the supply of ionizing photons in the early universe.
  • We present 10 new gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshifts and another five redshift limits based on host galaxy spectroscopy obtained as part of a large program conducted at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The redshifts span the range 0.345 < z < 2.54. Three of our measurements revise incorrect values from the literature. The homogeneous host sample researched here consists of 69 hosts that originally had a redshift completeness of 55% (with 38 out of 69 hosts having redshifts considered secure). Our project, including VLT/X-shooter observations reported elsewhere, increases this fraction to 77% (53/69), making the survey the most comprehensive in terms of redshift completeness of any sample to the full Swift depth, analyzed to date. We present the cumulative redshift distribution and derive a conservative, yet small, associated uncertainty. We constrain the fraction of Swift GRBs at high redshift to a maximum of 14% (5%) for z > 6 (z > 7). The mean redshift of the host sample is assessed to be <z> > 2.2, with the 10 new redshifts reducing it significantly. Using this more complete sample, we confirm previous findings that the GRB rate at high redshift (z > 3) appears to be in excess of predictions based on assumptions that it should follow conventional determinations of the star formation history of the universe, combined with an estimate of its likely metallicity dependence. This suggests that either star formation at high redshifts has been significantly underestimated, for example due to a dominant contribution from faint, undetected galaxies, or that GRB production is enhanced in the conditions of early star formation, beyond that usually ascribed to lower metallicity.
  • [Abridged] A number of phenomena have been observed in GRB afterglows that defy explanation by simple versions of the standard fireball model, leading to a variety of new models. Polarimetry can be a major independent diagnostic of afterglow physics, probing the magnetic field properties and internal structure of the GRB jets. In this paper we present the first high quality multi-night polarimetric light curve of a Swift GRB afterglow, aimed at providing a well calibrated dataset of a typical afterglow to serve as a benchmark system for modelling afterglow polarisation behaviour. In particular, our dataset of the afterglow of GRB 091018 (at redshift z=0.971) comprises optical linear polarimetry (R band, 0.13 - 2.3 days after burst); circular polarimetry (R band) and near-infrared linear polarimetry (Ks band). We add to that high quality optical and near-infrared broadband light curves and spectral energy distributions as well as afterglow spectroscopy. The linear polarisation varies between 0 and 3%, with both long and short time scale variability visible. We find an achromatic break in the afterglow light curve, which corresponds to features in the polarimetric curve. We find that the data can be reproduced by jet break models only if an additional polarised component of unknown nature is present in the polarimetric curve. We probe the ordered magnetic field component in the afterglow through our deep circular polarimetry, finding P_circ < 0.15% (2 sigma), the deepest limit yet for a GRB afterglow, suggesting ordered fields are weak, if at all present. Our simultaneous R and Ks band polarimetry shows that dust induced polarisation in the host galaxy is likely negligible.
  • We present deep infrared (Ks band) imaging polarimetry and radio (1.4 and 4.8 GHz) polarimetry of the enigmatic transient Swift J164449.3+573451. This source appears to be a short lived jet phenomenon in a galaxy at redshift z = 0.354, activated by a sudden mass accretion onto the central massive black hole, possibly caused by the tidal disruption of a star. We aim to find evidence for this scenario through linear polarimetry, as linear polarisation is a sensitive probe of jet physics, source geometry and the various mechanisms giving rise to the observed radiation. We find a formal Ks band polarisation measurement of P_lin = 7.4 +/- 3.5 % (including systematic errors). Our radio observations show continuing brightening of the source, which allows sensitive searches for linear polarisation as a function of time. We find no evidence of linear polarisation at radio wavelengths of 1.4 GHz and 4.8 GHz at any epoch, with the most sensitive 3 sigma limits as deep as 2.1%. These upper limits are in agreement with expectations from scenarios in which the radio emission is produced by the interaction of a relativistic jet with a dense circumsource medium. We further demonstrate how the polarisation properties can be used to derive properties of the jet in Swift J164449.3+573451, exploiting the similarities between this source and the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts.
  • The X-ray telescope on board the Swift satellite for gamma-ray burst astronomy has been exposed to the radiation of the space environment since launch in November 2004. Radiation causes damage to the detector, with the generation of dark current and charge trapping sites that result in the degradation of the spectral resolution and an increase of the instrumental background. The Swift team has a dedicated calibration program with the goal of recovering a significant proportion of the lost spectroscopic performance. Calibration observations of supernova remnants with strong emission lines are analysed to map the detector charge traps and to derive position-dependent corrections to the measured photon energies. We have achieved a substantial recovery in the XRT resolution by implementing these corrections in an updated version of the Swift XRT gain file and in corresponding improvements to the Swift XRT HEAsoft software. We provide illustrations of the impact of the enhanced energy resolution, and show that we have recovered most of the spectral resolution lost since launch.
  • GRB 070125 is among the most energetic bursts detected and the most extensively observed so far. Nevertheless, unresolved issues are still open in the literature on the physics of the afterglow and on the GRB environment. In particular, GRB 070125 was claimed to have exploded in a galactic halo environment, based on the uniqueness of the optical spectrum and the non-detection of an underlying host galaxy. In this work we collect all publicly available data and address these issues by modelling the NIR-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) and studying the high signal-to-noise VLT/FORS afterglow spectrum in comparison with a larger sample of GRB absorbers. The SED reveals a synchrotron cooling break in the UV, low equivalent hydrogen column density and little reddening caused by a LMC- or SMC-type extinction curve. From the weak MgII absorption at z=1.5477 in the spectrum, we derived logN(MgII)=12.96+0.13-0.18 and upper limits on the ionic column density of several metals. These suggest that the GRB absorber is most likely an LLS with a 0.03Z\odot<Z<1.3Z\odot metallicity. The comparison with other GRB absorbers places GRB070125 at the low end of the absorption line equivalent width distribution, confirming that weak spectral features and spectral-line poor absorbers are not so uncommon in afterglow spectra. Moreover, we show that the effect of photo-ionization on the gas surrounding the GRB, combined with a low N(HI) along a short segment of the line of sight within the host galaxy, can explain the lack of spectral features in GRB070125. Finally, the non-detection of an underlying galaxy is consistent with a faint GRB host galaxy, well within the GRB host brightness distribution. Thus, the possibility that GRB070125 is simply located in the outskirts of a gas-rich, massive star-forming region inside its small and faint host galaxy seems more likely than a gas-poor, halo environment origin.
  • Variable X-ray and gamma-ray emission is characteristic of the most extreme physical processes in the Universe, and studying the sources of these energetic photons has been a major driver in astronomy for the past 50 years. Here we present multiwavelength observations of a unique gamma-ray selected transient, discovered by Swift, which was accompanied by bright emission across the electromagnetic spectrum, and whose properties are unlike any previously observed source. We pinpoint the event to the center of a small, star-forming galaxy at redshift z=0.3534. Its high-energy emission has lasted much longer than any gamma-ray burst, while its peak luminosity was about 100 times higher than the brightest active galactic nuclei. The association of the outburst with the center of its host galaxy suggests that this phenomenon has its origin in a new, rare mechanism associated with a massive black hole in the nucleus of a galaxy.
  • It is thought that the first generations of massive stars in the Universe were an important, and quite possibly dominant, source of the ultra-violet radiation that reionized the hydrogen gas in the intergalactic medium (IGM); a state in which it has remained to the present day. Measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropies suggest that this phase-change largely took place in the redshift range z=10.8 +/- 1.4, while observations of quasars and Lyman-alpha galaxies have shown that the process was essentially completed by z=6. However, the detailed history of reionization, and characteristics of the stars and proto-galaxies that drove it, remain unknown. Further progress in understanding requires direct observations of the sources of ultra-violet radiation in the era of reionization, and mapping the evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction through time. The detection of galaxies at such redshifts is highly challenging, due to their intrinsic faintness and high luminosity distance, whilst bright quasars appear to be rare beyond z~7. Here we report the discovery of a gamma-ray burst, GRB 090423, at redshift z=8.26 -0.08 +0.07. This is well beyond the redshift of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxy (z=6.96) and quasar (z=6.43). It establishes that massive stars were being produced, and dying as GRBs, ~625 million years after the Big Bang. In addition, the accurate position of the burst pinpoints the location of the most distant galaxy known to date. Larger samples of GRBs beyond z~7 will constrain the evolving rate of star formation in the early universe, while rapid spectroscopy of their afterglows will allow direct exploration of the progress of reionization with cosmic time.
  • GRB060505 and GRB060614 are nearby long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) without accompanying supernovae (SNe) down to very strict limits. They thereby challenge the conventional LGRB-SN connection and naturally give rise to the question: are there other peculiar features in their afterglows which would help shed light on their progenitors? To answer this question, we combine new observational data with published data and investigate the multi-band temporal and spectral properties of the two afterglows. We find that both afterglows can be well interpreted within the framework of the jetted standard external shock wave model, and that the afterglow parameters for both bursts fall well within the range observed for other LGRBs. Hence, from the properties of the afterglows there is nothing to suggest that these bursts should have another progenitor than other LGRBs. Recently, Swift-discovered GRB080503 also has the spike + tail structure during its prompt gamma-ray emission seemingly similar to GRB060614. We analyse the prompt emission of this burst and find that this GRB is actually a hard-spike + hard-tail burst with a spectral lag of 0.8$\pm$0.4 s during its tail emission. Thus, the properties of the prompt emission of GRB060614 and GRB080503 are clearly different, motivating further thinking of GRB classification. Finally we note that, whereas the progenitor of the two SN-less bursts remains uncertain, the core-collapse origin for the SN-less bursts would be quite certain if a wind-like environment can be observationally established, e.g, from an optical decay faster than the X-ray decay in the afterglow's slow cooling phase.
  • In May 2008 the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 1627-41 resumed its bursting activity after nearly a decade of quiescence. After detection of a bright burst, Swift pointed its X-ray telescope in the direction of the source in less than five hours and followed it for over five weeks. In this paper we present an analysis of the data from these Swift observations and an XMM-Newton one performed when SGR 1627-41 was still in a quiescent state. The analysis of the bursts detected with Swift/BAT shows that their temporal and spectral properties are similar to those found in previous observations of SGR 1627-41 and other soft gamma-ray repeaters. The maximum peak luminosity of the bursts was about 2E+41 erg/s. Our data show that the outburst was accompanied by a fast flux enhancement and by a hardening of the spectrum with respect to the persistent emission.
  • Gamma-ray bursts are powerful probes of the early universe, but locating and identifying very distant GRBs remains challenging. We report here the discovery of the K-band afterglow of Swift GRB 060923A, imaged within the first hour post-burst, and the faintest so far found. It was not detected in any bluer bands to deep limits, making it a candidate very high redshift burst (z>11). However, our later-time optical imaging and spectroscopy reveal a faint galaxy coincident with the GRB position which, if it is the host, implies a more moderate redshift (most likely z<2.8) and therefore that dust is the likely cause of the very red afterglow colour. This being the case, it is one of the few instances so far found of a GRB afterglow with high dust extinction.
  • We present science highlights and performance from the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT), which was launched on November 20, 2004. The XRT covers the 0.2-10 keV band, and spends most of its time observing gamma-ray burst (GRB)afterglows, though it has also performed observations of many other objects. By mid-August 2007, the XRT had observed over 220 GRB afterglows, detecting about 96% of them. The XRT positions enable followup ground-based optical observations, with roughly 60% of the afterglows detected at optical or near IR wavelengths. Redshifts are measured for 33% of X-ray afterglows. Science highlights include the discovery of flaring behavior at quite late times, with implications for GRB central engines; localization of short GRBs, leading to observational support for compact merger progenitors for this class of bursts; a mysterious plateau phase to GRB afterglows; as well as many other interesting observations such as X-ray emission from comets, novae, galactic transients, and other objects.