• The stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) in galaxies can provide important information on the processes that participate in the dynamical heating of their disc components (e.g. giant molecular clouds, mergers, spiral density waves, bars). Earlier findings suggested a strong relation between the shape of the disc SVE and Hubble type, with later-type galaxies displaying more anisotropic ellipsoids and early-types being more isotropic. In this paper, we revisit the strength of this relation using an exhaustive compilation of observational results from the literature on this issue. We find no clear correlation between the shape of the disc SVE and morphological type, and show that galaxies with the same Hubble type display a wide range of vertical-to-radial velocity dispersion ratios. The points are distributed around a mean value and scatter of $\sigma_z/\sigma_R=0.7\pm 0.2$. With the aid of numerical simulations, we argue that different mechanisms might influence the shape of the SVE in the same manner and that the same process (e.g. mergers) does not have the same impact in all the galaxies. The complexity of the observational picture is confirmed by these simulations, which suggest that the vertical-to-radial axis ratio of the SVE is not a good indicator of the main source of disc heating. Our analysis of those simulations also indicates that the observed shape of the disc SVE may be affected by several processes simultaneously and that the signatures of some of them (e.g. mergers) fade over time.
  • The cataclysmic variable ASAS J002511+1217.2 was discovered in outburst by the All-Sky Automated Survey in September 2004, and intensively monitored by AAVSO observers through the following two months. Both photometry and spectroscopy indicate that this is a very short-period system. Clearly defined superhumps with a period of 0.05687 +/- 0.00001 days (1-sigma) are present during the superoutburst, 5 to 18 days following the ASAS detection. We observe a change in superhump profile similar to the transition to ``late superhumps'' observed in other short-period systems; the superhump period appears to increase slightly for a time before returning to the original value, with the resulting superhump phase offset by approximately half a period. We detect variations with a period of 0.05666 +/- 0.00003 days (1-sigma) during the four-day quiescent phase between the end of the main outburst and the single echo outburst. Weak variations having the original superhump period reappear during the echo and its rapid decline. Time-resolved spectroscopy conducted nearly 30 days after detection and well into the decline yields an orbital period measurement of 82 +/- 5 minutes. Both narrow and broad components are present in the emission line spectra, indicating the presence of multiple emission regions. The weight of the observational evidence suggests that ASAS J002511+1217.2 is a WZ Sge-type dwarf nova, and we discuss how this system fits into the WZ classification scheme.