• (abridged) Our aim is to determine the radial abundance profile of SiO and HCN throughout the stellar outflow of R Dor, an oxygen-rich AGB star with a low mass-loss rate. We have analysed molecular transitions of CO, SiO, and HCN measured with the APEX telescope and all three instruments on the Herschel Space Observatory, together with literature data. Photometric data and the infrared spectrum measured by ISO-SWS were used to constrain the dust component of the outflow. Using both continuum and line radiative transfer methods, a physical envelope model of both gas and dust was established. We have performed an analysis of the SiO and HCN molecular transitions in order to calculate their abundances. We have obtained an envelope model that describes the dust and the gas in the outflow, and determined the abundance of SiO and HCN throughout the region of the outflow probed by our molecular data. For SiO, we find that the initial abundance lies between $5.5 \times 10^{-5}$ and $6.0 \times 10^{-5}$ w.r.t. H$_2$. The abundance profile is constant up to $60\ \pm 10\ R_*$, after which it declines following a Gaussian profile with an $e$-folding radius of $3.5 \pm 0.5 \times 10^{13}$ cm. For HCN, we find an initial abundance of $5.0 \times 10^{-7}$ w.r.t. H$_2$. The Gaussian profile that describes the decline starts at the stellar surface and has an $e$-folding radius $r_e$ of $1.85 \pm 0.05 \times 10^{15}$ cm. We cannot to unambiguously identify the mechanism by which SiO is destroyed at $60\ \pm 10\ R_*$. The initial abundances found are larger than previously determined (except for one previous study on SiO), which might be due to the inclusion of higher-$J$ transitions. The difference in abundance for SiO and HCN compared to high mass-loss rate Mira star IK Tau might be due to different pulsation characteristics of the central star and/or a difference in dust condensation physics.
  • AIM: In this study we examine rotational emission lines of two isotopologues of water: H$_2$$^{17}$O and H$_2$$^{18}$O. By determining the abundances of these molecules, we aim to use the derived isotopologue --- and hence oxygen isotope --- ratios to put constraints on the masses of a sample of M-type AGB stars that have not been classified as OH/IR stars. METHODS: We use detailed radiative transfer analysis based on the accelerated lambda iteration method to model the circumstellar molecular line emission of H$_2$$^{17}$O and H$_2$$^{18}$O for IK Tau, R Dor, W Hya, and R Cas. The emission lines used to constrain our models come from Herschel/HIFI and Herschel/PACS observations and are all optically thick, meaning that full radiative transfer analysis is the only viable method of estimating molecular abundance ratios. RESULTS: We find generally low values of the $^{17}$O/$^{18}$O ratio for our sample, ranging from 0.15 to 0.69. This correlates with relatively low initial masses, in the range $\sim1.0$ to 1.5 M$_\odot$ for each source, based on stellar evolutionary models. We also find ortho-to-para ratios close to 3, which are expected from warm formation predictions. CONCLUSIONS: The $^{17}$O/$^{18}$O ratios found for this sample are at the lower end of the range predicted by stellar evolutionary models, indicating that the sample chosen had relatively low initial masses.
  • The aim of this paper is to investigate the $^{17}$O/$^{18}$O ratio for a sample of AGB stars, containing M-, S- and C-type stars. These ratios are evaluated in relation to fundamental stellar evolution parameters: the stellar initial mass and pulsation period. Circumstellar $^{13}$C$^{16}$O, $^{12}$C$^{17}$O and $^{12}$C$^{18}$O line observations were obtained for a sample of nine stars with various single-dish long-wavelength facilities. Line intensity ratios are shown to relate directly to the surface $^{17}$O/$^{18}$O abundance ratio. Stellar evolution models predict the $^{17}$O/$^{18}$O ratio to be a sensitive function of initial mass and to remain constant throughout the entire TP-AGB phase for stars initially less massive than 5\,$M_{\odot}$. This makes the measured ratio a probe of the initial stellar mass. Observed $^{17}$O/$^{18}$O ratios are found to be well in the range predicted by stellar evolution models that do not consider convective overshooting. From this, accurate initial mass estimates are calculated for seven sources. For the remaining two sources two mass solutions result, though with a larger probability that the low-mass solution is the correct one. Finally, hints at a possible separation between M/S- and C-type stars when comparing the $^{17}$O/$^{18}$O ratio to the stellar pulsation period are presented.
  • We report the serendipitous detection with ALMA of the vibrationally-excited pure-rotational CO transition $v=1, J=3-2$ towards five asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, $o$ Cet, R Aqr, R Scl, W Aql, and $\pi^1$ Gru. The observed lines are formed in the poorly-understood region located between the stellar surface and the region where the wind starts, the so-called warm molecular layer. We successfully reproduce the observed lines profiles using a simple model. We constrain the extents, densities, and kinematics of the region where the lines are produced. R Aqr and R Scl show inverse P-Cygni line profiles which indicate infall of material onto the stars. The line profiles of $o$ Cet and R Scl show variability. The serendipitous detection towards these five sources shows that vibrationally-excited rotational lines can be observed towards a large number of nearby AGB stars using ALMA. This opens a new possibility for the study of the innermost regions of AGB circumstellar envelopes.
  • We report on the discovery of a planetary companion candidate with a minimum mass Msini = 4.6 M_J orbiting the K2 III giant star HD 175370 (KIC 007940959). This star was a target in our program to search for planets around a sample of 95 giant stars observed with Kepler. This detection was made possible using precise stellar radial velocity measurements of HD 175370 taken over five years and four months using the coude echelle spectrograph of the 2-m Alfred Jensch Telescope and the fibre-fed echelle spectrograph HERMES of the 1.2-m Mercator Telescope. Our radial velocity measurements reveal a periodic (349.5 days) variation with a semi-amplitude K = 133 m/s, superimposed on a long-term trend. A low-mass stellar companion with an orbital period of ~88 years in a highly eccentric orbit and a planet in a Keplerian orbit with an eccentricity e = 0.22 are the most plausible explanation of the radial velocity variations. However, we cannot exclude the existence of stellar envelope pulsations as a cause for the low-amplitude radial velocity variations and only future continued monitoring of this system may answer this uncertainty. From Kepler photometry we find that HD 175370 is most likely a low-mass red-giant branch or asymptotic-giant branch star.
  • We use high-angular-resolution images obtained with SPHERE/ZIMPOL to study the photosphere, the warm molecular layer, and the inner wind of the close-by oxygen-rich AGB star R Doradus. We present observations in filters V, cntH$\alpha$, and cnt820 and investigate the surface brightness distribution of the star and of the polarised light produced in the inner envelope. Thanks to second-epoch observations in cntH$\alpha$, we are able to see variability on the stellar photosphere. We find that in the first epoch the surface brightness of R Dor is asymmetric in V and cntH$\alpha$, the filters where molecular opacity is stronger, while in cnt820 the surface brightness is closer to being axisymmetric. The second-epoch observations in cntH$\alpha$ show that the morphology of R Dor changes completely in a timespan of 48 days to a more axisymmetric and compact configuration. The polarised intensity is asymmetric in all epochs and varies by between a factor of 2.3 and 3.7 with azimuth for the different images. We fit the radial profile of the polarised intensity using a spherically symmetric model and a parametric description of the dust density profile, $\rho(r)=\rho_\circ r^{-n}$. On average, we find exponents of $- 4.5 \pm 0.5$ that correspond to a much steeper density profile than that of a wind expanding at constant velocity. The dust densities we derive imply an upper limit for the dust-to-gas ratio of $\sim 2\times10^{-4}$ at 5.0 $R_\star$. Given the uncertainties in observations and models, this value is consistent with the minimum values required by wind-driving models for the onset of a wind, of $\sim 3.3\times10^{-4}$. However, if the steep density profile we find extends to larger distances from the star, the dust-to-gas ratio will quickly become too small for the wind of R Dor to be driven by the grains that produce the scattered light.
  • We aim to constrain the temperature and velocity structures, and H2O abundances in the winds of a sample of M-type AGB stars. We further aim to determine the effect of H2O line cooling on the energy balance in the inner circumstellar envelope. We use two radiative-transfer codes to model molecular emission lines of CO and H2O towards four M-type AGB stars. We focus on spectrally resolved observations of CO and H2O from HIFI. The observations are complemented by ground-based CO observations, and spectrally unresolved CO and H2O observations with PAC. The observed line profiles constrain the velocity structure throughout the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs), while the CO intensities constrain the temperature structure in the CSEs. The H2O observations constrain the o-H2O and p-H2O abundances relative to H2. Finally, the radiative-transfer modelling allows to solve the energy balance in the CSE, in principle including also H2O line cooling. The fits to the line profiles only set moderate constraints on the velocity profile, indicating shallower acceleration profiles in the winds of M-type AGB stars than predicted by dynamical models, while the CO observations effectively constrain the temperature structure. Including H2O line cooling in the energy balance was only possible for the low-mass-loss-rate objects in the sample, and required an ad hoc adjustment of the dust velocity profile in order to counteract extreme cooling in the inner CSE. H2O line cooling was therefore excluded from the models. The constraints set on the temperature profile by the CO lines nevertheless allowed us to derive H2O abundances. The derived H2O abundances confirm previous estimates and are consistent with chemical models. However, the uncertainties in the derived abundances are relatively large, in particular for p-H2O, and consequently the derived o/p-H2O ratios are not well constrained.
  • Context. The recent detection of warm H$_2$O vapor emission from the outflows of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars challenges the current understanding of circumstellar chemistry. Two mechanisms have been invoked to explain warm H$_2$O vapor formation. In the first, periodic shocks passing through the medium immediately above the stellar surface lead to H$_2$O formation. In the second, penetration of ultraviolet interstellar radiation through a clumpy circumstellar medium leads to the formation of H$_2$O molecules in the intermediate wind. Aims. We aim to determine the properties of H$_2$O emission for a sample of 18 carbon-rich AGB stars and subsequently constrain which of the above mechanisms provides the most likely warm H$_2$O formation pathway. Methods, Results, and Conclusions. See paper.
  • Gamma Doradus and delta Scuti pulsators cover the transition region between low mass and massive main-sequence stars, and as such, are critical for testing stellar models. When they reside in binary systems, we can combine two independent methods to derive critical information, such as precise fundamental parameters to aid asteroseismic modelling. In the Kepler light curve of KIC10080943, clear signatures of gravity- and pressure-mode pulsations have been found. Ground-based spectroscopy revealed this target to be a double-lined binary system. We present the analysis of four years of Kepler photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy to derive observational constraints with which to evaluate theoretical predictions of the stellar structure and evolution for intermediate-mass stars. We used the method of spectral disentangling to determine atmospheric parameters for both components and derive the orbital elements. With PHOEBE, we modelled the ellipsoidal variation and reflection signal of the binary in the light curve and used classical Fourier techniques to analyse the pulsation modes. We show that the eccentric binary system KIC10080943 contains two hybrid pulsators with masses $M_1=2.0\pm0.1~M_\odot$ and $M_2=1.9\pm0.1~M_\odot$, with radii $R_1=2.9\pm0.1~R_\odot$ and $R_2=2.1\pm0.2~R_\odot$. We detect rotational splitting in the g modes and p modes for both stars and use them to determine a first rough estimate of the core-to-surface rotation rates for the two components, which will be improved by future detailed seismic modelling.
  • Context: AGB stars lose a large percentage of their mass in a dust-driven wind. This creates a circumstellar envelope, which can be studied through thermal dust emission and molecular emission lines. In the case of high mass-loss rates, this study is complicated by the high optical depths and the intricate coupling between gas and dust radiative transfer characteristics. An important aspect of the physics of gas-dust interactions is the strong influence of dust on the excitation of several molecules, including H2O. Aims: The dust and gas content of the envelope surrounding the high mass-loss rate OH/IR star OH 127.8+0.0, as traced by Herschel observations, is studied, with a focus on the H2O content and the dust-to-gas ratio. We report detecting a large number of H2O vapor emission lines up to J = 9 in the Herschel data, for which we present the measured line strengths. Methods: The treatments of both gas and dust species are combined using two numerical radiative transfer codes. The method is illustrated for both low and high mass-loss-rate sources. Specifically, we discuss different ways of assessing the dust-to-gas ratio: 1) from the dust thermal emission spectrum and the CO molecular gas line strengths; 2) from the momentum transfer from dust to gas and the measured gas terminal velocity; and 3) from the determination of the required amount of dust to reproduce H2O lines for a given H2O vapor abundance. These three diagnostics probe different zones of the outflow, for the first time allowing an investigation of a possible radial dependence of the dust-to-gas ratio. Results: ... Continued in article.
  • Gamma Doradus stars (hereafter gamma Dor stars) are gravity-mode pulsators of spectral type A or F. Such modes probe the deep stellar interior, offering a detailed fingerprint of their structure. Four-year high-precision space-based Kepler photometry of gamma Dor stars has become available, allowing us to study these stars with unprecedented detail. We selected, analysed, and characterized a sample of 67 gamma Dor stars for which we have Kepler observations available. For all the targets in the sample we assembled high-resolution spectroscopy to confirm their F-type nature. We found fourteen binaries, among which four single-lined binaries, five double-lined binaries, two triple systems and three binaries with no detected radial velocity variations. We estimated the orbital parameters whenever possible. For the single stars and the single-lined binaries, fundamental parameter values were determined from spectroscopy. We searched for period spacing patterns in the photometric data and identified this diagnostic for 50 of the stars in the sample, 46 of which are single stars or single-lined binaries. We found a strong correlation between the spectroscopic vsini and the period spacing values, confirming the influence of rotation on gamma Dor-type pulsations as predicted by theory. We also found relations between the dominant g-mode frequency, the longest pulsation period detected in series of prograde modes, vsini, and log Teff.
  • Low- and intermediate-mass stars go through a period of intense mass-loss at the end of their lives in a phase known as the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). During the AGB a significant fraction of their initial mass is expelled in a stellar wind. This process controls the final stages of their evolution and contributes to the chemical evolution of galaxies. However, the wind-driving mechanism of AGB stars is not yet well understood, especially so for oxygen-rich sources. Characterizing both the present-day mass-loss and wind structure and the evolution of the mass-loss rate of such stars is paramount to advancing our understanding of this processes. We modelled the dust envelope of W Hya using an advanced radiative transfer code. The dust model was analysed in the light of a previously calculated gas-phase wind model and compared to measurements available in the literature, such as infrared spectra, infrared images, and optical scattered light fractions. We find that the dust spectrum of W Hya can partly be explained by a gravitationally bound dust shell that probably is responsible for most of the amorphous Al$_2$O$_3$ emission. The composition of the large ($\sim$\,0.3\,$\mu$m) grains needed to explain the scattered light cannot be constrained, but probably is dominated by silicates. Silicate emission in the thermal infrared was found to originate from beyond 40 AU from the star and we find that they need to have substantial near-infrared opacities to be visible at such large distances. The increase in near-infrared opacity of the dust at these distances roughly coincides with a sudden increase in expansion velocity as deduced from the gas-phase CO lines. Finally, the recent mass loss of W Hya is confirmed to be highly variable and we identify a strong peak in the mass-loss rate that occurred about 3500 years ago and lasted for a few hundred years.
  • We study the grain properties and location of the forsterite crystals in the circumstellar environment of the pre-planetary nebula (PPN) IRAS 17150-3224 in order to learn more about the as yet poorly understood evolutionary phase prior to the PPN. We use the best-fit model for IRAS 17150-3224 of Meixner et al. (2002) and add forsterite to this model. We investigate different spatial distributions and grain sizes of the forsterite crystals in the circumstellar environment. We compare the spectral bands of forsterite in the mid-infrared and at 69 micrometre in radiative transport models to those in ISO-SWS and Herschel/PACS observations. We can reproduce the non-detection of the mid-infrared bands and the detection of the 69 micrometre feature with models where the forsterite is distributed in the whole outflow, in the superwind region, or in the AGB-wind region emitted previous to the superwind, but we cannot discriminate between these three models. To reproduce the observed spectral bands with these three models, the forsterite crystals need to be dominated by a grain size population of 2 micrometre up to 6 micrometre. We hypothesise that the large forsterite crystals were formed after the superwind phase of IRAS 17150-3224, where the star developed an as yet unknown hyperwind with an extremely high mass-loss rate (10^-3 Msol/yr). The high densities of such a hyperwind could be responsible for the efficient grain growth of both amorphous and crystalline dust in the outflow. Several mechanisms are discussed that might explain the lower-limit of 2 micrometre found for the forsterite grains, but none are satisfactory. Among the mechanisms explored is a possible selection effect due to radiation pressure based on photon scattering on micron-sized grains.
  • (abbreviated) We aim to study the inner wind of the well-known AGB star CW Leo. Different diagnostics probing different geometrical scales have pointed toward a non-homogeneous mass-loss process: dust clumps are observed at milli-arcsec scale, a bipolar structure is seen at arcsecond-scale and multi-concentric shells are detected beyond 1". We present the first ALMA Cycle 0 band 9 data around 650 GHz. The full-resolution data have a spatial resolution of 0".42x0".24, allowing us to study the morpho-kinematical structure within ~6". Results: We have detected 25 molecular lines. The emission of all but one line is spatially resolved. The dust and molecular lines are centered around the continuum peak position. The dust emission has an asymmetric distribution with a central peak flux density of ~2 Jy. The molecular emission lines trace different regions in the wind acceleration region and suggest that the wind velocity increases rapidly from about 5 R* almost reaching the terminal velocity at ~11 R*. The channel maps for the brighter lines show a complex structure; specifically for the 13CO J=6-5 line different arcs are detected within the first few arcseconds. The curved structure present in the PV map of the 13CO J=6-5 line can be explained by a spiral structure in the inner wind, probably induced by a binary companion. From modeling the ALMA data, we deduce that the potential orbital axis for the binary system lies at a position angle of ~10-20 deg to the North-East and that the spiral structure is seen almost edge-on. We infer an orbital period of 55 yr and a binary separation of 25 au (or ~8.2 R*). We tentatively estimate that the companion is an unevolved low-mass main-sequence star. The ALMA data hence provide us for the first time with the crucial kinematical link between the dust clumps seen at milli-arcsecond scale and the almost concentric arcs seen at arcsecond scale.
  • The evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) is mainly controlled by the rate at which these stars lose mass in a stellar wind. Understanding the driving mechanism and strength of the stellar winds of AGB stars and the processes enriching their surfaces with products of nucleosynthesis are paramount to constraining AGB evolution and predicting the chemical evolution of galaxies. In a previous paper we have constrained the structure of the outflowing envelope of W Hya using spectral lines of the $^{12}$CO molecule. Here we broaden this study by modelling an extensive set of H$_{2}$O and $^{28}$SiO lines observed by the three instruments on board Herschel using a state-of-the-art molecular excitation and radiative transfer code. The oxygen isotopic ratios and the $^{28}$SiO abundance profile can be connected to the initial stellar mass and to crucial aspects of dust formation at the base of the stellar wind, respectively. The modelling of H$_{2}$O and $^{28}$SiO confirms the properties of the envelope model of W Hya derived from $^{12}$CO lines. We find an H$_2$O ortho-to-para ratio of 2.5\,$^{+2.5}_{-1.0}$, consistent with what is expected for an AGB wind. The O$^{16}$/O$^{17}$ ratio indicates that W Hya has an initial mass of about 1.5 M$_\odot$. Although the ortho- and para-H$_{2}$O lines observed by HIFI appear to trace gas of slightly different physical properties, a turbulence velocity of $0.7\pm0.1$ km s$^{-1}$ fits the HIFI lines of both spin isomers and those of $^{28}$SiO well. The ortho- and para-H$_2^{16}$O and $^{28}$SiO abundances relative to H$_{2}$ are $(6^{+3}_{-2}) \times 10^{-4}$, $(3^{+2}_{-1}) \times 10^{-4}$, and $(3.3\pm 0.8)\times 10^{-5}$, respectively. Assuming a solar silicon-to-carbon ratio, the $^{28}$SiO line emission model is consistent with about one-third of the silicon atoms being locked up in dust particles.
  • S-type AGB stars have a C/O ratio which suggests that they are transition objects between oxygen-rich M-type stars and carbon-rich C-type stars. As such, their circumstellar compositions of gas and dust are thought to be sensitive to their precise C/O ratio, and it is therefore of particular interest to examine their circumstellar properties. We present new Herschel HIFI and PACS sub-millimetre and far-infrared line observations of several molecular species towards the S-type AGB star W Aql. We use these observations, which probe a wide range of gas temperatures, to constrain the circumstellar properties of W Aql, including mass-loss rate and molecular abundances. We used radiative transfer codes to model the circumstellar dust and molecular line emission to determine circumstellar properties and molecular abundances. We assumed a spherically symmetric envelope formed by a constant mass-loss rate driven by an accelerating wind. Our model includes fully integrated H2O line cooling as part of the solution of the energy balance. We detect circumstellar molecular lines from CO, H2O, SiO, HCN, and, for the first time in an S-type AGB star, NH3. The radiative transfer calculations result in an estimated mass-loss rate for W Aql of 4.0e-6 Msol yr-1 based on the 12CO lines. The estimated 12CO/13CO ratio is 29, which is in line with ratios previously derived for S-type AGB stars. We find an H2O abundance of 1.5e-5, which is intermediate to the abundances expected for M and C stars, and an ortho/para ratio for H2O that is consistent with formation at warm temperatures. We find an HCN abundance of 3e-6, and, although no CN lines are detected using HIFI, we are able to put some constraints on the abundance, 6e-6, and distribution of CN in W Aql's circumstellar envelope using ground-based data. We find an SiO abundance of 3e-6, and an NH3 abundance of 1.7e-5, confined to a small envelope.
  • Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars lose their envelopes by means of a stellar wind whose driving mechanism is not understood well. Characterizing the composition and thermal and dynamical structure of the outflow provides constraints that are essential for understanding AGB evolution, including the rate of mass loss and isotopic ratios. We modeled the CO emission from the wind of the low mass-loss rate oxygen-rich AGB star W Hya using data obtained by the HIFI, PACS, and SPIRE instruments onboard the Herschel Space Observatory and ground-based telescopes. $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO lines are used to constrain the intrinsic $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratio from resolved HIFI lines. The acceleration of the outflow up to about 5.5 km/s is quite slow and can be represented by a beta-type velocity law with index 5. Beyond this point, acceleration up the terminal velocity of 7 km/s is faster. Using the J=10-9, 9-8, and 6-5 transitions, we find an intrinsic $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratio of $18\pm10$ for W Hya, where the error bar is mostly due to uncertainties in the $^{12}$CO abundance and the stellar flux around 4.6 $\mu$m. To match the low-excitation CO lines, these molecules need to be photo-dissociated at about 500 stellar radii. The radial dust emission intensity profile measured by PACS images at 70 $\mu$m shows substantially stronger emission than our model predicts beyond 20 arcsec. The initial slow acceleration of the wind implies inefficient wind driving in the lower part of the envelope. The final injection of momentum in the wind might be the result of an increase in the opacity thanks to the late condensation of dust species. The derived intrinsic isotopologue ratio for W Hya is consistent with values set by the first dredge-up and suggestive of an initial mass of 2 M$_\odot$ or more. However, the uncertainty in the main-sequence mass derived based on this isotopologic ratio is large.
  • Spectra of OH/IR stars show prominent spectral bands of crystalline olivine (Mg$_{(2-2x)}$Fe$_{(2x)}$SiO$_{4}$). To learn more about the timescale of the outflows of OH/IR stars, we study the spectral band of crystalline olivine at 69 {\mu}m. The 69 {\mu}m band is of interest because its width and peak wavelength position are sensitive to the grain temperature and to the exact composition of the crystalline olivine. With Herschel/PACS, we observed the 69 {\mu}m band in the outflow of 14 OH/IR stars. By comparing the crystalline olivine features of our sample with those of model spectra, we determined the size of the outflow and its crystalline olivine abundance. The temperature indicated by the observed 69 {\mu}m bands can only be reproduced by models with a geometrically compact superwind ($R_{\rm{SW}}\lesssim$ 2500 AU = 1400 R$_{*}$).This means that the superwind started less than 1200 years ago (assuming an outflow velocity of 10 km/s). The small amount of mass lost in one superwind and the high progenitor mass of the OH/IR stars introduce a mass loss and thus evolutionary problem for these objects, which has not yet been understood.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (muchfuss) aims to discover subdwarf-B stars with massive compact companions such as overmassive white dwarfs (M > 1.0 M_sun), neutron stars or black holes. From the 127 subdwarfs with substantial radial-velocity variations discovered in the initial survey, a number of interesting objects have been selected for extensive follow-up. After an initial photometry run with BUSCA revealed that FBS 0117+396 is photometrically variable both on long and short timescales, we chose it as an auxiliary target during a 6-night multi-color photometry run with Ultracam. Spectroscopy was obtained at a number of observatories in order to determine the binary period and obtain a radial-velocity amplitude. After establishing an orbital period of P = 0.252 d, and removing the signal associated with the irradiated hemisphere of the M-dwarf companion, we were able to detect ten pulsation periods in the Fourier spectrum of the light curve. Two pulsation modes are found to have short periods of 337 and 379 s, and at least eight modes are found with periods between 45 minutes and 2.5 hours. This establishes that FBS 0117+396 is an sdB+dM reflection binary, in which the primary is a hybrid pulsator, and the first one found with this particular melange of flavours.
  • We present the first binary modelling results for the pulsating eclipsing binary KIC 11285625, discovered by the Kepler mission. An automated method to disentangle the pulsation spectrum and the orbital variability in high quality light curves, was developed and applied. The goal was to obtain accurate orbital and component properties, in combination with essential information derived from spectroscopy. A binary model for KIC 11285625 was obtained, using a combined analysis of high-quality space-based Kepler light curves and ground-based high-resolution HERMES echelle spectra. The binary model was used to separate the pulsation characteristics from the orbital variability in the Kepler light curve in an iterative way. We used an automated procedure to perform this task, based on the JKTEBOP binary modelling code, and adapted codes for frequency analysis and prewhitening of periodic signals. Using a disentangling technique applied to the composite HERMES spectra, we obtained a higher signal-to-noise mean component spectrum for both the primary and the secondary. A model grid search method for fitting synthetic spectra was used for fundamental parameter determination for both components. Accurate orbital and component properties of KIC 11285625 were derived, and we have obtained the pulsation spectrum of the gamma Dor pulsator in the system. Detailed analysis of the pulsation spectrum revealed amplitude modulation on a time scale of a hundred days, and strong indications of frequency splittings at both the orbital frequency, and the rotational frequency derived from spectroscopy.
  • The space-missions MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler deliver a huge amount of high-quality photometric data suitable to study numerous pulsating stars. Our ultimate goal is a detection and analysis of an extended sample of Gamma Dor-type pulsating stars with the aim to search for observational evidence of non-uniform period spacings and rotational splittings of gravity modes in main-sequence stars typically twice as massive as the Sun. We applied an automated supervised photometric classification method to select a sample of 69 Gamma Doradus candidate stars. We used an advanced method to extract the Kepler light curves from the pixel data information using custom masks. For 36 of the stars, we obtained high-resolution spectroscopy with the HERMES spectrograph installed at the Mercator telescope. We find that all stars for which spectroscopic estimates of Teff and logg are available fall into the region of the HR diagram where the Gamma Dor and Delta Sct instability strips overlap. The stars cluster in a 700 K window in effective temperature, logg measurements suggest luminosity class IV-V. From the Kepler photometry, we identify 45 Gamma Dor-type pulsators, 14 Gamma Dor/Delta Sct hybrids, and 10 stars which are classified as "possibly Gamma Dor/Delta Sct hybrid pulsators". The results of photometric and spectroscopic classifications according to the type of variability are in perfect agreement. We find a clear correlation between the spectroscopically derived vsini and the frequencies of independent pulsation modes and show that it has nothing to do with rotational modulation of the stars but is related to their stellar pulsations. Our sample and frequency determinations offer a good starting point for seismic modelling of slow to moderately rotating Gamma Dor stars.
  • The predicted orbital period histogram of an sdB population is bimodal with a peak at short (< 10 days) and long (> 250 days) periods. Observationally, there are many short-period sdB systems known, but only very few long-period sdB binaries are identified. As these predictions are based on poorly understood binary interaction processes, it is of prime importance to confront the predictions to observational data. In this contribution we aim to determine the absolute dimensions of the long-period sdB+MS binary system PG1104+243. High-resolution spectroscopy time-series were obtained with HERMES at the Mercator telescope at La Palma, and analyzed to obtain radial velocities of both components. Photometry from the literature was used to construct the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the binary. Atmosphere models were used to fit this SED and determine the surface gravity and temperature of both components. The gravitational redshift provided an independent confirmation of the surface gravity of the sdB component. An orbital period of 753 +- 3 d and a mass ratio of q = 0.637 +- 0.015 were found from the RV-curves. The sdB component has an effective temperature of Teff = 33500 +- 1200 K and a surface gravity of logg = 5.84 +- 0.08 dex, while the cool companion is found to be a G-type star with Teff = 5930 +- 160 K and logg = 4.29 +- 0.05 dex. Assuming a canonical mass of Msdb = 0.47 Msun, the MS component has a mass of 0.74 +- 0.07 Msun, and its Teff corresponds to what is expected for a terminal age main-sequence star with sub-solar metalicity. PG1104+243 is the first long-period sdB binary in which accurate physical parameters of both components could be determined, and the first sdB binary in which the gravitational redshift is measured. Furthermore, PG1104+243 is the first sdB+MS system that shows consistent evidence for being formed through stable Roche-lobe overflow.
  • The broad 30 \mu m feature in carbon stars is commonly attributed to MgS dust particles. However, reproducing the 30 \mu m feature with homogeneous MgS grains would require much more sulfur relative to the solar abundance. Direct gas-phase condensation of MgS occurs at a low efficiency. Precipitation of MgS on SiC precursor grains provides a more efficient formation mechanism, such that the assumption of homogeneous MgS grains may not be correct. Using a Monte Carlo-based radiative transfer code, we aim to model the 30 \mu m feature of the extreme carbon star LL Peg with MgS dust particles. We find that for LL Peg this modeling is insensitive to the unknown MgS optical properties at \lambda < 10 \mu m. When MgS is allowed to be in thermal contact with amorphous carbon and SiC, the amount of MgS required to reproduce the strength of 30 \mu m feature agrees with the solar abundance of sulfur, thereby resolving the reported MgS mass problem. We conclude that MgS is a valid candidate to be the carrier of the 30 \mu m feature when it is part of a composite grain population that has optical properties representative of an ensemble of particle shapes.
  • We report the discovery of low-amplitude gravity-mode oscillations in the massive binary star V380 Cyg, from 180 d of Kepler custom-aperture space photometry and 5 months of high-resolution high signal-to-noise spectroscopy. The new data are of unprecedented quality and allowed to improve the orbital and fundamental parameters for this binary. The orbital solution was subtracted from the photometric data and led to the detection of periodic intrinsic variability with frequencies of which some are multiples of the orbital frequency and others are not. Spectral disentangling allowed the detection of line-profile variability in the primary. With our discovery of intrinsic variability interpreted as gravity mode oscillations, V380 Cyg becomes an important laboratory for future seismic tuning of the near-core physics in massive B-type stars.
  • B-type stars are promising targets for asteroseismic modelling, since their frequency spectrum is relatively simple. We deduce and summarise observational constraints for the hybrid pulsator, HD50230, earlier reported to have deviations from a uniform period spacing of its gravity modes. The combination of spectra and a high-quality light curve measured by the CoRoT satellite allow a combined approach to fix the position of HD50230 in the HR diagram. To describe the observed pulsations, classical Fourier analysis was combined with short-time Fourier transformations and frequency spacing analysis techniques. Visual spectra were used to constrain the projected rotation rate of the star and the fundamental parameters of the target. In a first approximation, the combined information was used to interpret multiplets and spacings to infer the true surface rotation rate and a rough estimate of the inclination angle. We identify HD50230 as a spectroscopic binary and characterise the two components. We detect the simultaneous presence of high-order g modes and low-order p and g-modes in the CoRoT light curve, but were unable to link them to line profile variations in the spectroscopic time series. We extract the relevant information from the frequency spectrum, which can be used for seismic modelling, and explore possible interpretations of the pressure mode spectrum.