• We present ALMA observations of the CO(6-5) and [CII] emission lines and the sub-millimetre continuum of the QSO SDSS J231038.88+185519.7. Our data have x10 better angular resolution and x10 better sensitivity in the CO(6-5) line, compared to previous studies, and enable us to resolve for the first time the molecular disk of a z~6 QSO. We find that the dense molecular gas emission is resolved in a rotating disk of size of 2.9+-0.5 kpc. The dust continuum has a size of 1.4+-0.2 kpc. We measure a molecular gas mass of $\rm M(H_2)=(3.2 \pm0.2) \times 10^{10}\rm M_{\odot}$, and a dynamical mass of $\rm M_{dyn} = (4.1\pm0.5) \times 10^{10}~ M_{\odot}$, which is a factor of 2 smaller than the previously reported [CII]-based estimate. We find a molecular gas fraction of $\mu=M(H_2)/M^*=3.5\pm0.6$. We derive a ratio $v_{rot}/\sigma \approx 1-2$ suggesting high gas turbulence and/or outflows/inflows. We estimate a global Toomre parameter Q= 0.2-0.5, indicating likely cloud fragmentation. We compare, at the same angular resolution, the CO(6-5) and [CII] distributions, finding that dense molecular gas is more centrally concentrated with respect to [CII], and that they show different line profiles. We provide a new estimate of the black hole mass using the CIV emission line detected in the X-SHOOTER/VLT spectrum, $\rm M_{BH}=(2.9\pm 0.3) \times 10^{9}~ M_{\odot}$. We find that all the high redshift QSOs, including J2310+1855, are in a regime where the QSO can drive massive outflows with loading factor $\eta>1$, if the scaling relations hold at these extreme regimes and at high redshift. We find that the current BH growth rate is similar to that of its host galaxy. We detect two line-emitting companions within 1000 km/s from the QSO redshift, located at projected distances of <30 kpc from the QSO. These galaxies trace an over-density around the QSO [...].
  • The SHINING survey (Paper I; Herrera-Camus et al. 2018) offers a great opportunity to study the properties of the ionized and neutral media of galaxies from prototypical starbursts and active galactic nuclei (AGN) to heavily obscured objects. Based on Herschel/PACS observations of the main far-infrared (FIR) fine-structure lines, in this paper we analyze the physical mechanisms behind the observed line deficits in galaxies, the apparent offset of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the mass-metallicity relation, and the scaling relations between [CII] 158 $\mu$m line emission and star formation rate (SFR). Based on a toy model and the Cloudy code, we conclude that the increase in the ionization parameter with FIR surface brightness can explain the observed decrease in the line-to-FIR continuum ratio of galaxies. In the case of the [CII] line, the increase in the ionization parameter is accompanied by a reduction in the photoelectric heating efficiency and the inability of the line to track the increase in the FUV radiation field as galaxies become more compact and luminous. In the central $\sim$kiloparsec regions of AGN galaxies we observe a significant increase in the [OI] 63 $\mu$m/[CII] line ratio; the AGN impact on the line-to-FIR ratios fades on global scales. Based on extinction-insensitive metallicity measurements of LIRGs we confirm that they lie below the mass-metallicity relation, but the offset is smaller than those reported in studies that use optical-based metal abundances. Finally, we present scaling relations between [CII] emission and SFR in the context of the main-sequence of star-forming galaxies.
  • We use the Herschel/PACS spectrometer to study the global and spatially resolved far-infrared (FIR) fine-structure line emission in a sample of 52 galaxies that constitute the SHINING survey. These galaxies include star-forming, active-galactic nuclei (AGN), and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). We find an increasing number of galaxies (and kiloparsec size regions within galaxies) with low line-to-FIR continuum ratios as a function of increasing FIR luminosity ($L_{\mathrm{FIR}}$), dust infrared color, $L_{\mathrm{FIR}}$ to molecular gas mass ratio ($L_{\mathrm{FIR}}/M_{\mathrm{mol}}$), and FIR surface brightness ($\Sigma_{\mathrm{FIR}}$). The correlations between the [CII]/FIR or [OI]/FIR ratios with $\Sigma_{\mathrm{FIR}}$ are remarkably tight ($\sim0.3$ dex scatter over almost four orders of magnitude in $\Sigma_{\mathrm{FIR}}$). We observe that galaxies with $L_{\mathrm{FIR}}/M_{\mathrm{mol}} \gtrsim 80\,L_{\odot}\,M_{\odot}^{-1}$ and $\Sigma_{\mathrm{FIR}}\gtrsim10^{11}$ $L_{\odot}$ kpc$^{-2}$ tend to have weak fine-structure line-to-FIR continuum ratios, and that LIRGs with infrared sizes $\gtrsim1$ kpc have line-to-FIR ratios comparable to those observed in typical star-forming galaxies. We analyze the physical mechanisms driving these trends in Paper II (Herrera-Camus et al. 2018). The combined analysis of the [CII], [NII], and [OIII] lines reveals that the fraction of the [CII] line emission that arises from neutral gas increases from 60% to 90% in the most active star-forming regions and that the emission originating in the ionized gas is associated with low-ionization, diffuse gas rather than with dense gas in HII regions. Finally, we report the global and spatially resolved line fluxes of the SHINING galaxies to enable the comparison and planning of future local and high-$z$ studies.
  • The increasing observational evidence of galactic outflows is considered as a sign of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in action. However, the physical mechanism responsible for driving the observed outflows remains unclear, and whether it is due to momentum, energy, or radiation is still a matter of debate. The observed outflow energetics, in particular the large measured values of the momentum ratio ($\dot{p}/(L/c) \sim 10$) and energy ratio ($\dot{E}_k/L \sim 0.05$), seems to favour the energy-driving mechanism; and most observational works have focused their comparison with wind energy-driven models. Here we show that AGN radiation pressure on dust can adequately reproduce the observed outflow energetics (mass outflow rate, momentum flux, and kinetic power), as well as the scalings with luminosity, provided that the effects of radiation trapping are properly taken into account. In particular, we predict a sub-linear scaling for the mass outflow rate ($\dot{M} \propto L^{1/2}$) and a super-linear scaling for the kinetic power ($\dot{E}_k \propto L^{3/2}$), in agreement with the observational scaling relations reported in the most recent compilation of AGN outflow data. We conclude that AGN radiative feedback can account for the global outflow energetics, at least equally well as the wind energy-driving mechanism, and therefore both physical models should be considered in the interpretation of future AGN outflow observations.
  • We present the first attempt to detect outflows from galaxies approaching the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) using a sample of 9 star-forming ($\rm SFR=31\pm 20~M_{\odot}~yr^{-1}$) $z\sim 5.5$ galaxies for which the [CII]158$\mu$m line has been previously obtained with ALMA. We first fit each line with a Gaussian function and compute the residuals by subtracting the best fitting model from the data. We combine the residuals of all sample galaxies and find that the total signal is characterised by a flux excess of $\sim 0.5$ mJy extended over $\sim 1000$ km~s$^{-1}$. Although we cannot exclude that part of this signal is due to emission from faint satellite galaxies, we show that the most probable explanation for the detected flux excess is the presence of broad wings in the [CII] lines, signatures of starburst-driven outflows. We infer an average outflow rate of $\rm \dot{M}=54\pm23~ M_{\odot}~yr^{-1}$, providing a loading factor $\eta=\rm \dot{M}/SFR=1.7\pm1.3$ in agreement with observed local starbursts. Our interpretation is consistent with outcomes from zoomed hydro-simulations of {\it Dahlia}, a $z\sim 6$ galaxy ($\rm SFR\sim 100~\rm M_{\odot}~yr^{-1}$) whose feedback-regulated star formation results into an outflow rate $\rm \dot{M}\sim 30~ M_{\odot}~yr^{-1}$. The quality of the ALMA data is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of the [CII] line profile in individual galaxies. Nevertheless, our results suggest that starburst-driven outflows are in place in the EoR and provide useful indications for future ALMA campaigns. Deeper observations of the [CII] line in this sample are required to better characterise feedback at high-$z$ and to understand the role of outflows in shaping early galaxy formation.
  • Himiko is one of the most luminous Ly{\alpha} emitters at z = 6.595. It has three star forming clumps detected in the rest-frame UV, with a total SFR = 20 M$_\odot$/yr. We report the ALMA detection of the [CII]158$\mu$m line emission in this galaxy with a significance of 9$\sigma$. The total [CII] luminosity (L[CII]= (1.2$\pm$0.2)$\times$10$^{8}$ L$_{\odot}$) is fully consistent with the local L[CII]-SFR relation. The ALMA high-angular resolution reveals that the [CII] emission is made of two distinct components. The brightest [CII] clump is extended over 4 kpc and is located on the peak of the Ly{\alpha} nebula, which is spatially offset by 1 kpc relative to the brightest UV clump. The second [CII] component is spatially unresolved (size $<$2 kpc) and coincident with one of the three UV clumps. While the latter component is consitent with the local L[CII]-SFR relation, the other components are scattered above and below the local relation. We shortly discuss the possible origin of the [CII] components and their relation with the star forming clumps traced by the UV emission.
  • The fraction of Lyman-$\alpha$ emitters among the galaxy population has been found to increase from $z\sim0$ to $z\sim6$ and drop dramatically at $z>6$. This drop has been interpreted as an effect of an increasingly neutral intergalactic medium with increasing redshift, while a LyC escape fraction evolving with redshift. We report the result of a large VLT/FORS2 program aiming to confirm spectroscopically a large galaxy sample at $z\geq6$ that has been selected in several independent fields through the Lyman Break technique. Combining those data with archival data, we create a large and homogeneous sample of $z\sim6$ galaxies ($N=127$), complete in terms of Ly$\alpha$ detection at $>95\%$ for EW(Ly$\alpha)\geq25\AA$. We use this sample to derive a new measurement of the LAE fraction at $z\sim6$ and derive the physical properties of these galaxies through spectral energy distribution fitting. We find a median LAE fraction at $z\sim6$ lower than in previous studies. The main difference between LAEs and non-LAEs is that the latter are significantly dustier. Using predictions of our SED fitting code accounting for nebular emission, we find an effective Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction $f^{eff}_{esc}(Ly\alpha)=0.23^{+0.36}_{-0.17}$ remarkably consistent with the value derived by comparing UV luminosity function with Ly$\alpha$ luminosity function. We conclude that the drop in the LAE fraction from $z\sim6$ to $z>6$ is less dramatic than previously found and the effect of an increasing IGM neutral fraction is possibly observed at $5<z<6$. Based on our derived $f^{eff}_{esc}(Ly\alpha)$, we find that the IGM has a relatively small impact on Ly$\alpha$ photon visibility at $z\sim6$, with a lower limit for the IGM transmission to \lya\ photons, $T_{IGM}\gtrsim0.20$, likely due to the presence of outflows. [abdridged]
  • We have performed a high sensitivity observation of the UFO/BAL quasar APM 08279+5255 at z=3.912 with NOEMA at 3.2 mm, aimed at detecting fast moving molecular gas. We report the detection of blueshifted CO(4-3) with maximum velocity (v95\%) of $-1340$ km s$^{-1}$, with respect to the systemic peak emission, and a luminosity of $L' = 9.9\times 10^9 ~\mu^{-1}$ K km s$^{-1}$ pc$^{-2}$ (where $\mu$ is the lensing magnification factor). We discuss various scenarios for the nature of this emission, and conclude that this is the first detection of fast molecular gas at redshift $>3$. We derive a mass flow rate of molecular gas in the range $\rm \dot M=3-7.4\times 10^3$ M$_\odot$/yr, and momentum boost $\dot P_{OF} / \dot P_{AGN} \sim 2-6$, therefore consistent with a momentum conserving flow. For the largest $\dot P_{OF}$ the scaling is also consistent with a energy conserving flow with an efficiency of $\sim$10-20\%. The present data can hardly discriminate between the two expansion modes. The mass loading factor of the molecular outflow $\eta=\dot M_{OF}/SFR$ is $>>1$. We also detect a molecular emission line at a frequency of 94.83 GHz, corresponding to a rest frame frequency of 465.8 GHz, which we tentatively identified with the cation molecule $\rm N_2H^+$(5-4), which would be the first detection of this species at high redshift. We discuss the alternative possibility that this emission is due to a CO emission line from the, so far undetected, lens galaxy. Further observations of additional transitions of the same species with NOEMA can discriminate between the two scenarios.
  • Studying the molecular component of the interstellar medium in metal-poor galaxies has been challenging because of the faintness of carbon monoxide emission, the most common proxy of H2. Here we present new detections of molecular gas at low metallicities, and assess the physical conditions in the gas through various CO transitions for 8 galaxies. For one, NGC 1140 (Z/Zsun ~ 0.3), two detections of 13CO isotopologues and atomic carbon, [CI](1-0), and an upper limit for HCN(1-0) are also reported. After correcting to a common beam size, we compared 12CO(2-1)/12CO(1-0) (R21) and 12CO(3-2)/12CO(1-0) (R31) line ratios of our sample with galaxies from the literature and find that only NGC 1140 shows extreme values (R21 ~ R31 ~ 2). Fitting physical models to the 12CO and 13CO emission in NGC 1140 suggests that the molecular gas is cool (kinetic temperature Tkin<=20 K), dense (H2 volume density nH2 >= $10^6$ cm$^{-3}$), with moderate CO column density (NCO ~ $10^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$) and low filling factor. Surprisingly, the [12CO]/[13CO] abundance ratio in NGC 1140 is very low (~ 8-20), lower even than the value of 24 found in the Galactic Center. The young age of the starburst in NGC 1140 precludes 13C enrichment from evolved intermediate-mass stars; instead we attribute the low ratio to charge-exchange reactions and fractionation, because of the enhanced efficiency of these processes in cool gas at moderate column densities. Fitting physical models to 12CO and [CI](1-0) emission in NGC 1140 gives an unusually low [12CO]/[12C] abundance ratio, suggesting that in this galaxy atomic carbon is at least 10 times more abundant than 12CO.
  • To improve our understanding of high-z galaxies we study the impact of H$_{2}$ chemistry on their evolution, morphology and observed properties. We compare two zoom-in high-resolution (30 pc) simulations of prototypical $M_{\star}\sim 10^{10} {\rm M}_{\odot}$ galaxies at $z=6$. The first, "Dahlia", adopts an equilibrium model for H$_{2}$ formation, while the second, "Alth{\ae}a", features an improved non-equilibrium chemistry network. The star formation rate (SFR) of the two galaxies is similar (within 50\%), and increases with time reaching values close to 100 ${\rm M}_{\odot}/\rm yr$ at $z=6$. They both have SFR-stellar mass relation consistent with observations, and a specific SFR of $\simeq 5\, {\rm Gyr}^{-1}$. The main differences arise in the gas properties. The non-equilibrium chemistry determines the H$\rightarrow$ H$_{2}$~transition to occur at densities $> 300\,{cm}^{-3}$, i.e. about 10 times larger than predicted by the equilibrium model used for Dahlia. As a result, Alth{\ae}a features a more clumpy and fragmented morphology, in turn making SN feedback more effective. Also, because of the lower density and weaker feedback, Dahlia sits $3\sigma$ away from the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation; Alth{\ae}a, instead nicely agrees with observations. The different gas properties result in widely different observables. Alth{\ae}a outshines Dahlia by a factor of 7 (15) in [CII]~$157.74\,\mu{\rm m}$ (H$_{2}$~$17.03\,\mu{\rm m}$) line emission. Yet, Alth{\ae}a is under-luminous with respect to the locally observed [CII]-SFR relation. Whether this relation does not apply at high-z or the line luminosity is reduced by CMB and metallicity effects remains as an open question.
  • We present new ALMA observations aimed at mapping molecular gas reservoirs through the CO(3-2) transition in three quasars at $z\simeq2.4$, LBQS 0109+0213, 2QZ J002830.4-281706, and [HB89] 0329-385. Previous [OIII]5007 observations of these quasars showed evidence for ionised outflows quenching star formation in their host galaxies. Systemic CO(3-2) emission has been detected only in one quasar, LBQS 0109+0213, where the CO(3-2) emission is spatially anti-correlated with the ionised outflow, suggesting that most of the molecular gas may have been dispersed or heated in the region swept by the outflow. In all three sources, including the one detected in CO, our constraints on the molecular gas mass indicate a significantly reduced reservoir compared to main-sequence galaxies at the same redshift, supporting a negative feedback scenario. In the quasar 2QZ J002830.4-281706, we tentatively detect an emission line blob blue-shifted by $v\sim-2000$ km/s with respect to the galaxy systemic velocity and spatially offset by 0.2 arcsec (1.7 kpc) with respect to the ALMA continuum peak. Interestingly, such emission feature is coincident in both velocity and space with the ionised outflow as seen in [OIII]5007. This tentative detection must be confirmed with deeper observations but, if real, it could represent the molecular counterpart of the ionised gas outflow driven by the AGN. Finally, in all ALMA maps we detect the presence of serendipitous line emitters within a projected distance $\sim 160$ kpc from the quasars. By identifying these features with the CO(3-2) transition, the serendipitous line emitters would be located within |$\Delta v$|$<$500 km/s from the quasars, hence suggesting an overdensity of galaxies in two out of three quasars.
  • We present the final data release of the APEX low-redshift legacy survey for molecular gas (ALLSMOG), comprising CO(2-1) emission line observations of 88 nearby, low-mass (10^8.5<M* [M_Sun]<10^10) star-forming galaxies carried out with the 230 GHz APEX-1 receiver on the APEX telescope. The main goal of ALLSMOG is to probe the molecular gas content of more typical and lower stellar mass galaxies than have been studied by previous CO surveys. We also present IRAM 30m observations of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission lines in nine galaxies aimed at increasing the M*<10^9 M_Sun sample size. In this paper we describe the observations, data reduction and analysis methods and we present the final CO spectra together with archival HI 21cm line observations for the entire sample of 97 galaxies. At the sensitivity limit of ALLSMOG, we register a total CO detection rate of 47%. Galaxies with higher M*, SFR, nebular extinction (A_V), gas-phase metallicity (O/H), and HI gas mass have systematically higher CO detection rates. In particular, the parameter according to which CO detections and non-detections show the strongest statistical differences is the gas-phase metallicity, for any of the five metallicity calibrations examined in this work. We investigate scaling relations between the CO(1-0) line luminosity and galaxy-averaged properties using ALLSMOG and a sub-sample of COLD GASS for a total of 185 sources that probe the local main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies and its +-0.3 dex intrinsic scatter from M* = 10^8.5 M_Sun to M* = 10^11 M_Sun. L'_{CO(1-0)} is most strongly correlated with the SFR, but the correlation with M* is closer to linear and almost comparably tight. The relation between L'_{CO(1-0)} and metallicity is the steepest one, although deeper CO observations of galaxies with A_V<0.5 mag may reveal an as much steep correlation with A_V. [abridged]
  • We present new ALMA observations of the [OIII]88$\mu$m line and high angular resolution observations of the [CII]158$\mu$m line in a normal star forming galaxy at z$=$7.1. Previous [CII] observations of this galaxy had detected [CII] emission consistent with the Ly$\alpha$ redshift but spatially slightly offset relative to the optical (UV-rest frame) emission. The new [CII] observations reveal that the [CII] emission is partly clumpy and partly diffuse on scales larger than about 1kpc. [OIII] emission is also detected at high significance, offset relative to the optical counterpart in the same direction as the [CII] clumps, but mostly not overlapping with the bulk of the [CII] emission. The offset between different emission components (optical/UV and different far-IR tracers) is similar to what observed in much more powerful starbursts at high redshift. We show that the [OIII] emitting clump cannot be explained in terms of diffuse gas excited by the UV radiation emitted by the optical galaxy, but it requires excitation by in-situ (slightly dust obscured) star formation, at a rate of about 7 M$_{\odot}$/yr. Within 20 kpc from the optical galaxy the ALMA data reveal two additional [OIII] emitting systems, which must be star forming companions. We discuss that the complex properties revealed by ALMA in the z$\sim$7.1 galaxy are consistent with expectations by recent models and cosmological simulations, in which differential dust extinction, differential excitation and different metal enrichment levels, associated with different subsystems assembling a galaxy, are responsible for the different appearance of the system when observed with different tracers.
  • We analyze a sample of $z$-dropout galaxies in the CANDELS GOODS South and UDS fields that have been targeted by a dedicated spectroscopic campaign aimed at detecting their Ly$\alpha$ line. Deep IRAC observations at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m are used to determine the strength of optical emission lines affecting these bands at z$\sim$6.5-6.9 in order to i) investigate possible physical differences between Ly$\alpha$ emitting and non-emitting sources; ii) constrain the escape fraction of ionizing photons; iii) provide an estimate of the specific star-formation rate at high redshifts. We find evidence of strong [OIII]+H$\beta$ emission in the average (stacked) SEDs of galaxies both with and without Ly$\alpha$ emission. The blue IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] color of the stack with detected Ly$\alpha$ line can be converted into a rest-frame equivalent width EW([OIII]+H$\beta$)=1500$^{+530}_{-440}\AA$ assuming a flat intrinsic stellar continuum. This strong optical line emission enables a first estimate of f$_{esc}\lesssim$20% on the escape fraction of ionizing photons from Ly$\alpha$ detected objects. The objects with no Ly$\alpha$ line show less extreme EW([OIII]+H$\beta$)=520$^{+170}_{-150}\AA$ suggesting different physical conditions of the HII regions with respect to Ly$\alpha$-emitting ones, or a larger f$_{esc}$. The latter case is consistent with a combined evolution of f$_{esc}$ and the neutral hydrogen fraction as an explanation of the lack of bright Ly$\alpha$ emission at z$>$6. A lower limit on the specific star formation rate, SSFR$>$9.1$Gyr^{-1}$ for $M_{star}=2 \times 10^9 M_{\odot}$ galaxies at these redshifts can be derived from the spectroscopically confirmed sample.
  • Recent observations have revealed massive galactic molecular outflows that may have physical conditions (high gas densities) required to form stars. Indeed, several recent models predict that such massive galactic outflows may ignite star formation within the outflow itself. This star-formation mode, in which stars form with high radial velocities, could contribute to the morphological evolution of galaxies, to the evolution in size and velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component of galaxies, and would contribute to the population of high-velocity stars, which could even escape the galaxy. Such star formation could provide in-situ chemical enrichment of the circumgalactic and intergalactic medium (through supernova explosions of young stars on large orbits), and some models also predict that it may contribute substantially to the global star formation rate observed in distant galaxies. Although there exists observational evidence for star formation triggered by outflows or jets into their host galaxy, as a consequence of gas compression, evidence for star formation occurring within galactic outflows is still missing. Here we report new spectroscopic observations that unambiguously reveal star formation occurring in a galactic outflow at a redshift of 0.0448. The inferred star formation rate in the outflow is larger than 15 Msun/yr. Star formation may also be occurring in other galactic outflows, but may have been missed by previous observations owing to the lack of adequate diagnostics.
  • We report the virial measurements of the BH mass of a sample of 17 type 2 AGN, drawn from the Swift/BAT 70-month 14-195 keV hard X-ray catalogue, where a faint BLR component has been measured via deep NIR (0.8-2.5 $\mu$m) spectroscopy. We compared the type 2 AGN with a control sample of 33 type 1 AGN. We find that the type 2 AGN BH masses span the 5$<$ log(M$_{BH}$ /M$_{\odot}$) $< $7.5 range, with an average log(M$_{BH}$/M$_{\odot}$) = 6.7, which is $\sim$ 0.8 dex smaller than found for type 1 AGN. If type 1 and type 2 AGN of the same X-ray luminosity log($L_{14-195}$/erg s$^{-1}$) $\sim$ 43.5 are compared, type 2 AGN have 0.5 dex smaller BH masses than type 1 AGN. Although based on few tens of objects, this result disagrees with the standard AGN unification scenarios in which type 1 and type 2 AGN are the same objects observed along different viewing angles with respect to a toroidal absorbing material.
  • We present Adaptive Optics assisted near-IR integral field spectroscopic observations of a luminous quasar at $z = 2.4$, previously observed as the first known example at high redshift of large scale quasar-driven outflow quenching star formation in its host galaxy. The nuclear spectrum shows broad and blueshifted H$\beta$ in absorption, which is tracing outflowing gas with high densities ($>10^8$ - $10^9$ cm$^{-3}$) and velocities in excess of 10,000 km s$^{-1}$. The properties of the outflowing clouds (covering factor, density, column density and inferred location) indicate that they likely originate from the Broad Line Region. The energetics of such nuclear regions are consistent with that observed in the large scale outflow, supporting models in which quasar driven outflows originate from the nuclear region and are energy conserving. We note that the asymmetric profile of both the H$\beta$ and H$\alpha$ emission lines is likely due to absorption by the dense outflowing gas along the line of sight. This outflow-induced asymmetry has implications on the estimation of the black hole mass using virial estimators, and warns about such effects for several other quasars characterized by similar line asymmetries. More generally, our findings may suggest a broader revision of the decomposition and interpretation of quasar spectral features, in order to take into account the presence of potential broad blueshifted Balmer absorption lines. Our high spatial resolution data also reveals redshifted, dynamically colder nebular emission lines, likely tracing an inflowing stream.
  • Feedback from accreting SMBHs is often identified as the main mechanism responsible for regulating star-formation in AGN host galaxies. However, the relationships between AGN activity, radiation, winds, and star-formation are complex and still far from being understood. We study scaling relations between AGN properties, host galaxy properties and AGN winds. We then evaluate the wind mean impact on the global star-formation history, taking into account the short AGN duty cycle with respect to that of star-formation. We first collect AGN wind observations for 94 AGN with detected massive winds at sub-pc to kpc spatial scales. We then fold AGN wind scaling relations with AGN luminosity functions, to evaluate the average AGN wind mass-loading factor as a function of cosmic time. We find strong correlations between the AGN molecular and ionised wind mass outflow rates and the AGN bolometric luminosity. The power law scaling is steeper for ionised winds (slope 1.29+/-0.38) than for molecular winds (0.76+/-0.06), meaning that the two rates converge at high bolometric luminosities. The molecular gas depletion timescale and the molecular gas fraction of galaxies hosting powerful AGN winds are 3-10 times shorter and smaller than those of main-sequence galaxies with similar SFR, stellar mass and redshift. These findings suggest that, at high AGN bolometric luminosity, the reduced molecular gas fraction may be due to the destruction of molecules by the wind, leading to a larger fraction of gas in the atomic ionised phase. The AGN wind mass-loading factor $\eta=\dot M_{OF}/SFR$ is systematically higher than that of starburst driven winds. Our analysis shows that AGN winds are, on average, powerful enough to clean galaxies from their molecular gas only in massive systems at z<=2, i.e. a strong form of co-evolution between SMBHs and galaxies appears to break down for the least massive galaxies.
  • We present the serendipitous ALMA detection of a faint submillimeter galaxy (SMG) lensed by a foreground z~1 galaxy. By optimizing the source detection to deblend the system, we accurately build the full spectral energy distribution of the distant galaxy from the I814 band to radio wavelengths. It is extremely red, with a I-K colour larger than 2.5. We estimate a photometric redshift of 3.28 and determine the physical parameters. The distant galaxy turns out to be magnified by the foreground lens by a factor of ~1.5, which implies an intrinsic Ks-band magnitude of ~24.5, a submillimeter flux at 870um of ~2.5 mJy and a SFR of ~150-300Msun/yr, depending on the adopted tracer. These values place our source towards the faint end of the distribution of observed SMGs, and in particular among the still few faint SMGs with a fully characterized spectral energy distribution, which allows us not only to accurately estimate its redshift but also to measure its stellar mass and other physical properties. The galaxy studied in this work is a representative of the population of faint SMGs, of which only few objects are known to date, that are undetected in optical and therefore are not typically accounted for when measuring the cosmic star formation history (SFH). This faint galaxy population thus likely represents an important and missing piece in our understanding of the cosmic SFH. Its observation and characterization is of major importance to achieve a solid picture of galaxy evolution.
  • We present zoom-in, AMR, high-resolution ($\simeq 30$ pc) simulations of high-redshift ($z \simeq 6$) galaxies with the aim of characterizing their internal properties and interstellar medium. Among other features, we adopt a star formation model based on a physically-sound molecular hydrogen prescription, and introduce a novel scheme for supernova feedback, stellar winds and dust-mediated radiation pressure. In the zoom-in simulation the target halo hosts "Dahlia", a galaxy with a stellar mass $M_*=1.6\times 10^{10}$M$_\odot$, representative of a typical $z\sim 6$ Lyman Break Galaxy. Dahlia has a total H2 mass of $10^{8.5}$M$_\odot$, that is mainly concentrated in a disk-like structure of effective radius $\simeq 0.6$ kpc and scale height $\simeq 200$ pc. Frequent mergers drive fresh gas towards the center of the disk, sustaining a star formation rate per unit area of $\simeq 15 $M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$. The disk is composed by dense ($n \gtrsim 25$ cm$^{-3}$), metal-rich ($Z \simeq 0.5 $ Z$_\odot$) gas, that is pressure-supported by radiation. We compute the $158\mu$m [CII] emission arising from {Dahlia}, and find that $\simeq 95\%$ of the total [CII] luminosity ($L_{[CII]}\simeq10^{7.5}$ L$_\odot$) arises from the H2 disk. Although $30\%$ of the CII mass is transported out of the disk by outflows, such gas negligibly contributes to [CII] emission, due to its low density ($n \lesssim 10$ cm$^{-3}$) and metallicity ($Z\lesssim 10^{-1}$Z$_\odot$). Dahlia is under-luminous with respect to the local [CII]-SFR relation; however, its luminosity is consistent with upper limits derived for most $z\sim6$ galaxies.
  • The survival of dust grains in galaxies depends on various processes. Dust can be produced in stars, it can grow in the interstellar medium and be destroyed by astration and interstellar shocks. In this paper, we assemble a few data samples of local and distant star-forming galaxies to analyse various dust-related quantities in low and high redshift galaxies, to study how the relations linking the dust mass to the stellar mass and star formation rate evolve with redshift. We interpret the available data by means of chemical evolution models for discs and proto-spheroid (PSPH) starburst galaxies. In particular, we focus on the dust-to-stellar mass (DTS) ratio, as this quantity represents a true measure of how much dust per unit stellar mass survives the various destruction processes in galaxies and is observable. The theoretical models outline the strong dependence of this quantity on the underlying star formation history. Spiral galaxies are characterised by a nearly constant DTS as a function of the stellar mass and cosmic time, whereas PSPHs present an early steep increase of the DTS, which stops at a maximal value and decreases in the latest stages. In their late starburst phase, these models show a decrease of the DTS with their mass, which allows us to explain the observed anti-correlation between the DTS and the stellar mass. The observed redshift evolution of the DTS ratio shows an increase from z~0 to z~1, followed by a roughly constant behaviour at 1<z<2.5. Our models indicate a steep decrease of the global DTS at early times, which implies an expected decrease of the DTS at larger redshift.
  • We derive new empirical calibrations for strong-line diagnostics of gas phase metallicity in local star forming galaxies by uniformly applying the Te method over the full metallicity range probed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To measure electron temperatures at high metallicity, where the auroral lines needed are not detected in single galaxies, we stacked spectra of more than 110,000 galaxies from the SDSS in bins of log[O II]/H$\beta$ and log[O III]/H$\beta$. This stacking scheme does not assume any dependence of metallicity on mass or star formation rate, but only that galaxies with the same line ratios have the same oxygen abundance. We provide calibrations which span more than 1 dex in metallicity and are entirely defined on a consistent absolute Te metallicity scale for galaxies. We apply our calibrations to the SDSS sample and find that they provide consistent metallicity estimates to within 0.05 dex.
  • We present medium resolution near infrared spectroscopic observations of 41 obscured and intermediate class AGN (type 2, 1.9 and 1.8; AGN2) with redshift $z \lesssim$0.1, selected from the Swift/BAT 70-month catalogue. The observations have been carried out in the framework of a systematic study of the AGN2 near infrared spectral properties and have been executed using ISAAC/VLT, X-shooter/VLT and LUCI/LBT, reaching an average S/N ratio of $\sim$30 per resolution element. For those objects observed with X-shooter we also obtained simultaneous optical and UV spectroscopy. We have identified a component from the broad line region in 13 out of 41 AGN2, with FWHM ${\rm > 800 }$ km/s. We have verified that the detection of the broad line region components does not significantly depend on selection effects due to the quality of the spectra, the X-ray or near infrared fluxes, the orientation angle of the host galaxy or the hydrogen column density measured in the X-ray band. The average broad line region components found in AGN2 has a significantly (a factor 2) smaller FWHM if compared with a control sample of type 1 AGN.
  • The first generation of E-ELT instruments will include an optical-infrared High Resolution Spectrograph, conventionally indicated as EELT-HIRES, which will be capable of providing unique breakthroughs in the fields of exoplanets, star and planet formation, physics and evolution of stars and galaxies, cosmology and fundamental physics. A 2-year long phase A study for EELT-HIRES has just started and will be performed by a consortium composed of institutes and organisations from Brazil, Chile, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom. In this paper we describe the science goals and the preliminary technical concept for EELT-HIRES which will be developed during the phase A, as well as its planned development and consortium organisation during the study.
  • We present new results on [CII]158$\mu$ m emission from four galaxies in the reionization epoch. These galaxies were previously confirmed to be at redshifts between 6.6 and 7.15 from the presence of the Ly$\alpha$ emission line in their spectra. The Ly$\alpha$ emission line is redshifted by 100-200 km/s compared to the systemic redshift given by the [CII] line. These velocity offsets are smaller than what is observed in z~3 Lyman break galaxies with similar UV luminosities and emission line properties. Smaller velocity shifts reduce the visibility of Ly$\alpha$ and hence somewhat alleviate the need for a very neutral IGM at z~7 to explain the drop in the fraction of Ly$\alpha$ emitters observed at this epoch. The galaxies show [CII] emission with L[CII]=0.6-1.6 x10$^8 L_\odot$: these luminosities place them consistently below the SFR-L[CII] relation observed for low redshift star forming and metal poor galaxies and also below z =5.5 Lyman break galaxies with similar star formation rates. We argue that previous undetections of [CII] in z~7 galaxies with similar or smaller star formation rates are due to selection effects: previous targets were mostly strong Ly$\alpha$ emitters and therefore probably metal poor systems, while our galaxies are more representative of the general high redshift star forming population .