• The X-ray luminosities of T Tauri stars are about two to four orders of magnitude higher than the luminosity of the contemporary Sun. As these stars are born in clusters, their disks are not only irradiated by their parent star but also by an X-ray background field produced by the cluster members. We aim to quantify the impact of X-ray background fields produced by young embedded clusters on the chemical structure of disks. Further, we want to investigate the importance of the dust for X-ray radiative transfer in disks. We present a new X-ray radiative transfer module for the radiation thermo-chemical disk code ProDiMo, which includes X-ray scattering and absorption by both the gas and dust component. For the X-ray radiative transfer, we consider irradiation by the star and by X-ray background fields. To study the impact of X-rays on the chemical structure of disks we use the well-established disk ionization tracers N2H+ and HCO+. For evolved dust populations, X-ray opacities are mostly dominated by the gas; only for photon energies $E\gtrsim5-10\,$keV, dust opacities become relevant. Consequently, the local disk X-ray radiation field is only affected in dense regions close to the disk midplane. X-ray background fields can dominate the local X-ray disk ionization rate for disk radii $r\gtrsim20\,$au. However, the N2H+ and HCO+ column densities are only significantly affected in case of low cosmic-ray ionization rates, or if the background flux is at least a factor of ten higher than the flux level expected for clusters typical for the solar vicinity. Observable signatures of X-ray background fields in low-mass star-formation regions, like Taurus, are only expected for cluster members experiencing a strong X-ray background field. For the majority of the cluster members, the X-ray background field has only little impact on the disk chemical structure.
  • The physical state of the gas in the central 500 pc of NGC~5128 (the radio galaxy Centaurus A - Cen A), was investigated using the far-infrared fine-structure lines of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen, as well as the CO(4-3) molecular line. The circumnuclear disk (CND) is traced by emission from dust and the neutral gas ([CI] and CO). A gas outflow with a line-of-sight velocity of 60 km/s is evident in both species. The center of the CND is bright in [OI], [OIII], and [CII]; [OI]63mu emission dominates that of [CII] even though it is absorbed with optical depths of 1.0-1.5. The outflow is well-traced by the [NII] and [NIII] lines and also seen in the [CII] and [OIII] lines that peak in the center. Ionized gas densities are moderate in the CND and low everywhere else. Neutral gas densities range from 4000 per cm3 (outflow, extended thin disk ETD) to 20 000 per cm3 (CND). The CND radiation field is weak compared to the ETD starburst field. The outflow has a much stronger radiation field. The total mass of all the CND gas is 9 x 10^(7) M(o) and the mass of the outflowing gas is only 15%-30% of that. The outflow most likely originates from the shock-dominated CND cavity surrounding the central black hole. With a factor of three uncertainty, the mass outflow rate is about 2 M(o)/yr, a thousand times higher than the accretion rate of the black hole. Without replenishment, the CND will be depleted in 15-120 million years. However, the outflow velocity is well below the escape velocity.
  • Mid-IR water lines from protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars have a detection rate of 50\%. Models have identified multiple physical properties of disks such as dust-to-gas mass ratio, dust size power law distribution, disk gas mass, disk inner radius, and disk scale height as potential explanation for the current detection rate. We search for a connection between mid-IR water line fluxes and the strength of the 10~$\mu$m silicate feature. We analyse observed water line fluxes from three blends and compute the 10~$\mu$m silicate feature strength from Spitzer spectra. We use a series of published models, exploring disk dust and gas properties, and the effects of different stars. The models also show that the increasing stellar luminosity enhance simultaneously the strength of this dust feature and the water lines fluxes. No correlation is found between the observed mid-IR water lines and the 10~$\mu$m silicate. Our sample shows the same difference in the peak strength between amorphous and crystalline silicates that was noted in earlier studies, but our models do not support this intrinsic difference in silicate peak strength. Individual properties of our model series are not able to reproduce the most extreme observations, suggesting that more complex dust properties are required. A parametrized settling prescription is able to boost the peak strength by a factor 2 for the standard model. Water line fluxes are unrelated to the composition of the dust. The pronounced regular trends seen in the model results are washed out in the data due to the larger diversity in stellar and disk properties compared to our model series. The disks with with weaker mid-IR water line fluxes are depleted in gas or enhanced in dust in the inner 10~au. In the case of gas depleted disks, settling produces very strong 10~$\mu$m silicate features, with strong peak strength.
  • LkCa 15 is an extensively studied star in the Taurus region known for its pre-transitional disk with a large inner cavity in dust continuum and normal gas accretion rate. The most popular hypothesis to explain the LkCa 15 data invokes one or more planets to carve out the inner cavity, while gas continues to flow across the gap from the outer disk onto the central star. We present spatially unresolved HCO+ J=4-3 observations of the LkCa 15 disk from the JCMT and model the data with the ProDiMo code. We find that: (1) HCO+ line-wings are clearly detected, certifying the presence of gas in the cavity within <50 AU of the star. (2) Reproducing the observed line-wing flux requires both a significant suppression of cavity dust (by a factor >10^4 compared to the ISM) and a substantial increase in the gas scale-height within the cavity (H_0/R_0 ~ 0.6). An ISM dust-to-gas ratio (d:g=10^-2) yields too little line-wing flux regardless of the scale-height or cavity gas geometry, while a smaller scale-height also under predicts the flux even with a reduced d:g. (3) The cavity gas mass is consistent with the surface density profile of the outer disk extended inwards to the sublimation radius (corresponding to mass M_d ~ 0.03 M_sun), and masses lower by a factor >10 appear to be ruled out.
  • We apply photo-dissociation region (PDR) molecular line emission models, that have varying degrees of enhanced mechanical heating rates, to the gaseous component of simulations of star-forming galaxies taken from the literature. Snapshots of these simulations are used to produce line emission maps for the rotational transitions of the CO molecule and its 13CO isotope up to J = 4-3. We consider two galaxy models: a small disk galaxy of solar metallicity and a lighter dwarf galaxy with 0.2 \zsun metallicity. Elevated excitation temperatures for CO(1 - 0) correlate positively with mechanical feedback, that is enhanced towards the central region of both model galaxies. The emission maps of these model galaxies are used to compute line ratios of CO and 13CO transitions. These line ratios are used as diagnostics where we attempt to match them These line ratios are used as diagnostics where we attempt to match them to mechanically heated single component (i.e. uniform density, Far-UV flux, visual extinction and velocity gradient) equilibrium PDR models. We find that PDRs ignoring mechanical feedback in the heating budget over-estimate the gas density by a factor of 100 and the far-UV flux by factors of ~10 - 1000. In contrast, PDRs that take mechanical feedback into account are able to fit all the line ratios for the central < 2 kpc of the fiducial disk galaxy quite well. The mean mechanical heating rate per H atom that we recover from the line ratio fits of this region varies between $10^{-27}$ -- $10^{-26}$~erg s$^{-1}$.
  • Far-infrared molecular emission is an important tool used to understand the excitation mechanisms of the gas in the inter-stellar medium of star-forming galaxies. In the present work, we model the emission from rotational transitions with critical densities n >~ 10^4 cm-3. We include 4-3 < J <= 15-14 transitions of CO and 13CO, in addition to J <= 7-6 transitions of HCN, HNC, and HCO+ on galactic scales. We do this by re-sampling high density gas in a hydrodynamic model of a gas-rich disk galaxy, assuming that the density field of the interstellar medium of the model galaxy follows the probability density function (PDF) inferred from the resolved low density scales. We find that in a narrow gas density PDF, with a mean density of ~10 cm-3 and a dispersion \sigma = 2.1 in the log of the density, most of the emission of molecular lines, emanates from the 10-1000 cm-3 part of the PDF. We construct synthetic emission maps for the central 2 kpc of the galaxy and fit the line ratios of CO and 13CO up to J = 15-14, as well as HCN, HNC, and HCO+ up to J = 7-6, using one photo-dissociation region (PDR) model. We attribute the goodness of the one component fits for our model galaxy to the fact that the distribution of the luminosity, as a function of density, is peaked at gas densities between 10 and 1000 cm-3. We explore the impact of different log-normal density PDFs on the distribution of the line-luminosity as a function of density, and we show that it is necessary to have a broad dispersion, corresponding to Mach numbers >~ 30 in order to obtain significant emission from n > 10^4 cm-3 gas. Such Mach numbers are expected in star-forming galaxies, LIRGS, and ULIRGS. By fitting line ratios of HCN(1-0), HNC(1-0), and HCO+(1-0) for a sample of LIRGS and ULIRGS using mechanically heated PDRs, we constrain the Mach number of these galaxies to 29 < M < 77.
  • We present a catalogue of nearly 3,000 submillimetre sources detected at 850um over ~5 square degrees surveyed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). This is the largest survey of its kind at 850um, probing a meaningful cosmic volume at the peak of star formation activity and increasing the sample size of submillimetre galaxies selected at 850um by an order of magnitude. We describe the wide 850um survey component of S2CLS, which covers the key extragalactic survey fields: UKIDSS-UDS, COSMOS, Akari-NEP, Extended Groth Strip, Lockman Hole North, SSA22 and GOODS-North. The average 1-sigma depth of S2CLS is 1.2 mJy/beam, approaching the SCUBA-2 850um confusion limit, which we determine to be ~0.8 mJy/beam. We measure the single dish 850um number counts to unprecedented accuracy, reducing the Poisson errors on the differential counts to approximately 4% at S_850~3mJy. With several independent fields, we investigate field-to-field variance, finding that the number counts on 0.5-1 degree scales are generally within 50% of the S2CLS mean for S_850>3mJy, with scatter consistent with the Poisson and estimated cosmic variance uncertainties, although there is a marginal (2-sigma) density enhancement in the GOODS-North field. The observed number counts are in reasonable agreement with recent phenomenological and semi-analytic models. Finally, the large solid angle of S2CLS allows us to measure the bright-end counts: at S_850>10mJy there are approximately ten sources per square degree, and we detect the distinctive up-turn in the number counts indicative of the detection of local sources of 850um emission and strongly lensed high-redshift galaxies. Here we describe the data collection and reduction procedures and present calibrated maps and a catalogue of sources; these are made publicly available.
  • The presence of dust can strongly affect the chemical composition of the interstellar medium. We model the chemistry in photodissociation regions (PDRs) using both gas-phase and dust-phase chemical reactions. Our aim is to determine the chemical compositions of the interstellar medium (gas/dust/ice) in regions with distinct (molecular) gas densities that are exposed to radiation fields with different intensities. We have significantly improved the Meijerink PDR code by including 3050 new gas-phase chemical reactions and also by implementing surface chemistry. In particular, we have included 117 chemical reactions occurring on grain surfaces covering different processes, such as adsorption, thermal desorption, chemical desorption, two-body reactions, photo processes, and cosmic-ray processes on dust grains. We obtain abundances for different gas and solid species as a function of visual extinction, depending on the density and radiation field. We also analyse the rates of the formation of CO2 and H2O ices in different environments. In addition, we study how chemistry is affected by the presence/absence of ice mantles (bare dust or icy dust) and the impact of considering different desorption probabilities. The type of substrate (bare dust or icy dust) and the probability of desorption can significantly alter the chemistry occurring on grain surfaces, leading to differences of several orders of magnitude in the abundances of gas-phase species, such as CO, H2CO, and CH3OH. The type of substrate, together with the density and intensity of the radiation field, also determine the threshold extinction to form ices of CO2 and H2O. We also conclude that H2CO and CH3OH are mainly released into the gas phase of low, far-ultraviolet illuminated PDRs through chemical desorption upon two-body surface reactions, rather than through photodesorption.
  • We propose a set of standard assumptions for the modelling of Class II and III protoplanetary disks, which includes detailed continuum radiative transfer, thermo-chemical modelling of gas and ice, and line radiative transfer from optical to cm wavelengths. We propose new standard dust opacities for disk models, we present a simplified treatment of PAHs sufficient to reproduce the PAH emission features, and we suggest using a simple treatment of dust settling. We roughly adjust parameters to obtain a model that predicts typical Class II T Tauri star continuum and line observations. We systematically study the impact of each model parameter (disk mass, disk extension and shape, dust settling, dust size and opacity, gas/dust ratio, etc.) on all continuum and line observables, in particular on the SED, mm-slope, continuum visibilities, and emission lines including [OI] 63um, high-J CO lines, (sub-)mm CO isotopologue lines, and CO fundamental ro-vibrational lines. We find that evolved dust properties (large grains) often needed to fit the SED, have important consequences for disk chemistry and heating/cooling balance, leading to stronger emission lines in general. Strong dust settling and missing disk flaring have similar effects on continuum observations, but opposite effects on far-IR gas emission lines. PAH molecules can shield the gas from stellar UV radiation because of their strong absorption and negligible scattering opacities. The observable millimetre-slope of the SED can become significantly more gentle in the case of cold disk midplanes, which we find regularly in our T Tauri models. We propose to use line observations of robust chemical tracers of the gas, such as O, CO, and H2, as additional constraints to determine some key properties of the disks, such as disk shape and mass, opacities, and the dust/gas ratio, by simultaneously fitting continuum and line observations.
  • The mid-IR detection rate of water lines in disks around Herbig stars disks is about 5\%, while it is around 50\% for disks around TTauri stars. The reason for this is still unclear. In this study, we want to find an explanation for the different detection rates between low mass and high mass pre-main-sequence stars (PMSs) in the mid-IR regime. We run disk models with stellar parameters adjusted to spectral types B9 through M2, using the radiation thermo-chemical disk modeling code ProDiMo. We produce convolved spectra at the resolution of Spitzer IRS, JWST MIRI and VLT VISIR spectrographs. We apply random noise derived from typical Spitzer spectra for a direct comparison with observations. The strength of the mid-IR water lines correlates directly with the luminosity of the central star. We explored a small parameter space around a standard disk model, considering dust-to-gas mass ratio, disk gas mass, mixing coefficient for dust settling, flaring index, dust maximum size and size power law distribution index. The models show that it is possible to suppress the water emission, however, current observations are not sensitive enough to detect mid-IR lines in disks for most of the explored parameters. The presence of noise in the spectra, combined with the high continuum flux (noise level is proportional to the continuum flux), is the most likely explanation for the non detections towards Herbig stars. Mid-IR spectra with resolution higher than 20000 are needed to investigate water in protoplanetary disks. Intrinsic differences in disk structure, e.g. inner gaps, gas-to-dust ratio, dust size and distribution, and inner disk scale height, between Herbig and TTauri star disks are able to explain a lower water detection rate in disks around Herbig stars.
  • We investigate which properties of protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars affect the physics and chemistry in the regions where mid- and far-IR water lines originate and their respective line fluxes. We search for diagnostics for future observations. With the code ProDiMo, we build a series of models exploring a large parameter space, computing rotational and rovibrational transitions of water in nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE). We select a sample of transitions in the mid- IR regime and the fundamental ortho and para water transitions in the far-IR. We investigate the chemistry and the local physical conditions in the line emitting regions. We calculate Spitzer spectra for each model and compare far-IR and mid-IR lines. In addition, we use mid-IR colors to tie the water line predictions to the dust continuum. Parameters affecting the water line fluxes in disks by more than a factor of three are : the disk gas mass, the dust-to-gas mass ratio, the dust maximum grain size, ISM(InterStellarMedium) UV radiation field, the mixing parameter of Dubrulle settling, the disk flaring parameter, and the dust size distribution. The first four parameters affect the mid-IR lines much more than the far-IR lines. A key driver behind water spectroscopy is the dust opacity, which sets the location of the water line emitting region. We identify three types of parameters. Parameters, such as dust-to-gas ratio, ISM radiation field, and dust size distribution, affect the mid-IR lines more, while the far-IR transitions are more affected by the flaring index. The gas mass greatly affects lines in both regimes. Higher spectral resolution and line sensitivities, like from the James Webb Space Telescope, are needed to detect a statistically relevant sample of individual water lines to distinguish further between these types of parameters.
  • In this paper we investigate the origin of the mid-infrared (IR) hydrogen recombination lines for a sample of 114 disks in different evolutionary stages (full, transitional and debris disks) collected from the {\it Spitzer} archive. We focus on the two brighter {H~{\sc i}} lines observed in the {\it Spitzer} spectra, the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) at 12.37$\mu$m and the {H~{\sc i}}(9-7) at 11.32$\mu$m. We detect the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line in 46 objects, and the {H~{\sc i}}(9-7) in 11. We compare these lines with the other most common gas line detected in {\it Spitzer} spectra, the {[Ne~{\sc iii}]} at 12.81$\mu$m. We argue that it is unlikely that the {H~{\sc i}} emission originates from the photoevaporating upper surface layers of the disk, as has been found for the {[Ne~{\sc iii}]} lines toward low-accreting stars. Using the {H~{\sc i}}(9-7)/{H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line ratios we find these gas lines are likely probing gas with hydrogen column densities of 10$^{10}$-10$^{11}$~cm$^{-3}$. The subsample of objects surrounded by full and transitional disks show a positive correlation between the accretion luminosity and the {H~{\sc i}} line luminosity. These two results suggest that the observed mid-IR {H~{\sc i}} lines trace gas accreting onto the star in the same way as other hydrogen recombination lines at shorter wavelengths. A pure chromospheric origin of these lines can be excluded for the vast majority of full and transitional disks.We report for the first time the detection of the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line in eight young (< 20~Myr) debris disks. A pure chromospheric origin cannot be ruled out in these objects. If the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line traces accretion in these older systems, as in the case of full and transitional disks, the strength of the emission implies accretion rates lower than 10$^{-10}$M$_{\odot}$/yr. We discuss some advantages of extending accretion indicators to longer wavelengths.
  • (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 $\mu$m) luminosities ($L_{LIRG}>10^{11} $L$_\odot$ and $L_{ULIRG}>10^{12}$ L$_\odot$). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (HerCULES; PI van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (10$^{11}\leq L_\odot \geq10^{13}$). With the \emph{Herschel Space Observatory}, we observe [CII] 157 $\mu$m, [OI] 63 $\mu$m, and [OI] 145 $\mu$m line emission with PACS, CO J=4-3 through J=13-12, [CI] 370 $\mu$m, and [CI] 609 $\mu$m with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [OI] 63 $\mu$m emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the IRAS 60/100 $\mu$m ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors. We present cooling budgets for the galaxies and find fine-structure line flux deficits in the [CII], [SiII], [OI], and [CI] lines in the objects with the highest far IR fluxes, but do not observe this for CO $4\leq J_{upp}\leq13$. In order to study the heating of the molecular gas, we present a combination of three diagnostic quantities to help determine the dominant heating source. Using the CO excitation, the CO J=1-0 linewidth, and the AGN contribution, we conclude that galaxies with large CO linewidths always have high-excitation CO ladders, and often low AGN contributions, suggesting that mechanical heating is important.
  • Herschel/PACS observations of 29 local (Ultra-)Luminous Infrared Galaxies, including both starburst and AGN-dominated sources as diagnosed in the mid-infrared/optical, show that the equivalent width of the absorbing OH 65 um Pi_{3/2} J=9/2-7/2 line (W_{eq}(OH65)) with lower level energy E_{low}~300 K, is anticorrelated with the [C ii]158 um line to far-infrared luminosity ratio, and correlated with the far-infrared luminosity per unit gas mass and with the 60-to-100 um far-infrared color. While all sources are in the active L_{IR}/M_{H2}>50 Lsun/Msun mode as derived from previous CO line studies, the OH65 absorption shows a bimodal distribution with a discontinuity at L_{FIR}/M_{H2}~100 Lsun/Msun. In the most buried sources, OH65 probes material partially responsible for the silicate 9.7 um absorption. Combined with observations of the OH 71 um Pi_{1/2} J=7/2-5/2 doublet (E_{low}~415 K), radiative transfer models characterized by the equivalent dust temperature, Tdust, and the continuum optical depth at 100 um, tau_{100}, indicate that strong [C ii]158 um deficits are associated with far-IR thick (tau_{100}>~0.7, N_{H}>~10^{24} cm^{-2}), warm (Tdust>~60 K) structures where the OH 65 um absorption is produced, most likely in circumnuclear disks/tori/cocoons. With their high L_{FIR}/M_{H2} ratios and columns, the presence of these structures is expected to give rise to strong [C ii] deficits. W_{eq}(OH65) probes the fraction of infrared luminosity arising from these compact/warm environments, which is >~30-50% in sources with high W_{eq}({OH65}). Sources with high W_{eq}({OH65}) have surface densities of both L_{IR} and M_{H2} higher than inferred from the half-light (CO or UV/optical) radius, tracing coherent structures that represent the most buried/active stage of (circum)nuclear starburst-AGN co-evolution.
  • We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435um dust continuum emission in the central kpc of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1 arcsec = 329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0".26 x 0".20) into a circum-nuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f_{CO(6-5)} = 898 (+-153) Jy km/s, which is 63(+-12)% of the total CO(6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100pc < r < 350pc from the nucleus, looks clumpy and includes seven unresolved (or marginally resolved) knots with median velocity dispersion of 40 km/s. These knots are associated with strong star formation regions with \Sigma_{SFR} 100 M_\sun/yr/kpc^{2} and \Sigma_{Gas} 1.0E4 M_\sun/pc^{2}. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435um continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick AGN in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation from an expected local correlation between \Sigma_{Gas} and \Sigma_{SFR}, indicating a breakdown of the Kennicutt-Schmidt law on the linear scale of 100 pc.
  • We present FIR-CO luminosity relations ($\log L_{\rm FIR} = \alpha \log L'_{\rm CO} + \beta$) for the full CO rotational ladder from J=1-0 to J=13-12 for 62 local (z < 0.1) (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) using data from Herschel SPIRE-FTS and ground-based telescopes. We extend our sample to high redshifts (z > 1) by including 35 (sub)-millimeter selected dusty star forming galaxies from the literature with robust CO observations. The addition of luminous starbursts at high redshifts enlarge the range of the FIR-CO luminosity relations towards the high-IR-luminosity end while also significantly increasing the small amount of mid-/high-J CO line data available prior to Herschel. This new data-set (both in terms of IR luminosity and J-ladder) reveals linear FIR-CO luminosity relations ($\alpha \sim 1$) for J=1-0 up to J=5-4, with a nearly constant normalisation ($\beta \sim 2$). This is expected from the (also) linear FIR-(molecular line) relations found for the dense gas tracer lines (HCN and CS), as long as the dense gas mass fraction does not vary strongly within our (merger/starburst)-dominated sample. However from J=6-5 and up to J=13-12 we find an increasingly sub-linear slope and higher normalization constant with increasing J. We argue that these are caused by a warm (~100K) and dense ($>10^4{\rm cm^{-3}}$) gas component whose thermal state is unlikely to be maintained by star formation powered far-UV radiation fields (and thus is no longer directly tied to the star formation rate). We suggest that mechanical heating (e.g., supernova driven turbulence and shocks), and not cosmic rays, is the more likely source of energy for this component. The global CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs), which remain highly excited from J=6-5 up to J=13-12, are found to be a generic feature of the (U)LIRGs in our sample, and further support the presence of this gas component.
  • Understanding the heating and cooling mechanisms in nearby (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies can give us insight into the driving mechanisms in their more distant counterparts. Molecular emission lines play a crucial role in cooling excited gas, and recently, with Herschel Space Observatory we have been able to observe the rich molecular spectrum. CO is the most abundant and one of the brightest molecules in the Herschel wavelength range. CO transitions are observed with Herschel, and together, these lines trace the excitation of CO. We study Arp 299, a colliding galaxy group, with one component harboring an AGN and two more undergoing intense star formation. For Arp 299 A, we present PACS spectrometer observations of high-J CO lines up to J=20-19 and JCMT observations of $^{13}$CO and HCN to discern between UV heating and alternative heating mechanisms. There is an immediately noticeable difference in the spectra of Arp 299 A and Arp 299 B+C, with source A having brighter high-J CO transitions. This is reflected in their respective spectral energy line distributions. We find that photon-dominated regions (PDRs) are unlikely to heat all the gas since a very extreme PDR is necessary to fit the high-J CO lines. In addition, this extreme PDR does not fit the HCN observations, and the dust spectral energy distribution shows that there is not enough hot dust to match the amount expected from such an extreme PDR. Therefore, we determine that the high-J CO and HCN transitions are heated by an additional mechanism, namely cosmic ray heating, mechanical heating, or X-ray heating. We find that mechanical heating, in combination with UV heating, is the only mechanism that fits all molecular transitions. We also constrain the molecular gas mass of Arp 299 A to 3e9 Msun and find that we need 4% of the total heating to be mechanical heating, with the rest UV heating.
  • We present Herschel/PACS observations of extended [CII]157.7{\mu}m line emission detected on ~ 1 - 10 kpc scales in 60 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We find that most of the extra-nuclear emission show [CII]/FIR ratios >~ 4 x 10^-3, larger than the mean ratio seen in the nuclei, and similar to those found in the extended disks of normal star-forming galaxies and the diffuse inter-stellar medium (ISM) of our Galaxy. The [CII] "deficits" found in the most luminous local LIRGs are therefore restricted to their nuclei. There is a trend for LIRGs with warmer nuclei to show larger differences between their nuclear and extra-nuclear [CII]/FIR ratios. We find an anti-correlation between [CII]/FIR and the luminosity surface density, {\Sigma}_IR, for the extended emission in the spatially-resolved galaxies. However, there is an offset between this trend and that found for the LIRG nuclei. We use this offset to derive a beam filling-factor for the star-forming regions within the LIRG disks of ~ 6 % relative to their nuclei. We confront the observed trend to photo-dissociation region (PDR) models and find that the slope of the correlation is much shallower than the model predictions. Finally, we compare the correlation found between [CII]/FIR and {\Sigma}_IR with measurements of high-redshift starbursting IR-luminous galaxies.
  • We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission (rest-frame frequency = 691.473 GHz) and of the 435$\mu m$ dust continuum emission in the nuclear region of NGC 34, a local luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) at a distance of 84 Mpc (1" = 407 pc) which contains a Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) and a nuclear starburst. The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam ($\rm 0."26\times 0."23$), with an integrated flux of $\rm f_{CO~(6-5)} = 1004\; (\pm 151) \; Jy\; km\; s^{-1}$. Both the morphology and kinematics of the CO (6-5) emission are rather regular, consistent with a compact rotating disk with a size of 200 pc. A significant emission feature is detected on the red-shifted wing of the line profile at the frequency of the $\rm H^{13}CN\; (8-7)$ line, with an integrated flux of $\rm 17.7 \pm 2.1 (random) \pm 2.7 (sysmatic)\; Jy\;km\; s^{-1}$. However, it cannot be ruled out that the feature is due to an outflow of warm dense gas with a mean velocity of $\rm 400\; km\; s^{-1}$. The continuum is resolved into an elongated configuration, and the observed flux corresponds to a dust mass of $\rm M_{dust} = 10^{6.97\pm 0.13}\; M_{sun}$. An unresolved central core ($\rm radius \simeq 50\; pc$) contributes $28\%$ of the continuum flux and $19\%$ of the CO (6-5) flux, consistent with insignificant contributions of the AGN to both emissions. Both the CO (6-5) and continuum spatial distributions suggest a very high gas column density ($\rm >= 10^4\; M_{sun}\; pc^{-2}$) in the nuclear region at $\rm radius <= 100\; pc$.
  • The structure of protoplanetary disks is thought to be linked to the temperature and chemistry of their dust and gas. Whether the disk is flat or flaring depends on the amount of radiation that it absorbs at a given radius, and on the efficiency with which this is converted into thermal energy. The understanding of these heating and cooling processes is crucial to provide a reliable disk structure for the interpretation of dust continuum emission and gas line fluxes. Especially in the upper layers of the disk, where gas and dust are thermally decoupled, the infrared line emission is strictly related to the gas heating/cooling processes. We aim to study the thermal properties of the disk in the oxygen line emission region, and to investigate the relative importance of X-ray (1-120 Angstrom) and far-UV radiation (FUV, 912-2070 Angstrom) for the heating balance there. We use [OI] 63 micron line fluxes observed in a sample of protoplanetary disks of the Taurus/Auriga star forming region and compare it to the model predictions presented in our previous work. The data were obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory as part of the Herschel Open Time Key Program GASPS (GAS in Protoplanetary diskS), published in Howard et al. (2013). Our theoretical grid of disk models can reproduce the [OI] absolute fluxes and predict a correlation between [OI] and the sum Lx+Lfuv. The data show no correlation between the [OI] line flux and the X-ray luminosity, the FUV luminosity or their sum. The data show that the FUV or X-ray radiation has no notable impact on the region where the [OI] line is formed. This is in contrast with what is predicted from our models. Possible explanations are that the disks in Taurus are less flaring than the hydrostatic models predict, and/or that other disk structure aspects that were left unchanged in our models are important. ..abridged..
  • We present new CO and C^o line measurements of the compact circumnuclear disk in the center of NGC 128 (Centaurus~A) obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, as well as SEST, JCMT, and APEX. The Cen A center CO ladder is quite different from those of either star-burst galaxies or AGNs. In addition, the relative intensity of the central Cen A [CI] emission lines is much greate than that in any other galaxy. The CO surface brightness of the compact circumnuclear disk (CND) is significantly higher than that of the much more extended thin disk (ETD) in the same line of sight. Our LVG and PDR/XDR models suggest that much of the CND gas is relatively cool (25 - 80 K) and not very dense (~ 300 cm^{-3}) if the heating is by UV photons, although there is some gas in both the CND and the ETD with a much higher density of ~30 000 cm^{-3}. Finally, there is also high-excitation, high-density phase in the CND (but not in the ETD), either in the form of an extreme PDR but more likely in the form of an XDR. The total gas mass of the Cen A CND is 8.4 x 10^{7} M(sun), uncertain by a factor of two. The CO-H2 conversion factor is 4 x 10^{20} K km/s, also within a factor of two.
  • We present spectrally resolved Herschel/HIFI observations of the young multiple system T Tau in atomic and molecular lines. While CO, H2O, [C II], and SO lines trace the envelope and the outflowing gas up to velocities of 33 km/s with respect to systemic, the CN 5-4 hyperfine structure lines at 566.7, 566.9 GHz show a narrow double-peaked profile centered at systemic velocity, consistent with an origin in the outer region of the compact disk of T Tau N. Disk modeling of the T Tau N disk with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo produces CN line fluxes and profiles consistent with the observed ones and constrain the size of the gaseous disk (R_out = 110 (+10, -20) AU) and its inclination (i = 25 \pm 5 degree). The model indicates that the CN lines originate in a disk upper layer at 40-110 AU from the star, which is irradiated by the stellar UV field and heated up to temperatures of 50-700 K. With respect to previously observed CN 2-1 millimeter lines, the CN 5-4 lines appear to be less affected by envelope emission, due to their larger critical density and excitation temperature. Hence, high-J CN lines are a unique confusion-free tracer of embedded disks, such as the disk of T Tau N.
  • Starburst galaxies are undergoing intense periods of star formation. Understanding the heating and cooling mechanisms in these galaxies can give us insight to the driving mechanisms that fuel the starburst. Molecular emission lines play a crucial role in the cooling of the excited gas. With SPIRE on the Herschel Space Observatory we have observed the rich molecular spectrum towards the central region of NGC 253. CO transitions from J=4-3 to 13-12 are observed and together with low-J line fluxes from ground based observations, these lines trace the excitation of CO. By studying the CO excitation ladder and comparing the intensities to models, we investigate whether the gas is excited by UV radiation, X-rays, cosmic rays, or turbulent heating. Comparing the $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO observations to large velocity gradient models and PDR models we find three main ISM phases. We estimate the density, temperature,and masses of these ISM phases. By adding $^{13}$CO, HCN, and HNC line intensities, we are able to constrain these degeneracies and determine the heating sources. The first ISM phase responsible for the low-J CO lines is excited by PDRs, but the second and third phases, responsible for the mid to high-J CO transitions, require an additional heating source. We find three possible combinations of models that can reproduce our observed molecular emission. Although we cannot determine which of these are preferable, we can conclude that mechanical heating is necessary to reproduce the observed molecular emission and cosmic ray heating is a negligible heating source. We then estimate the mass of each ISM phase; $6\times 10^7$ M$_\odot$ for phase 1 (low-J CO lines), $3\times 10^7$ M$_\odot$ for phase 2 (mid-J CO lines), and $9\times 10^6$ M$_\odot$ for phase 3 (high-J CO lines) for a total system mass of $1\times10^{8}$ M$_\odot$.
  • We investigate the multi-wavelength properties of a sample of 450-\mu m selected sources from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). A total of 69 sources were identified above 4\sigma\ in deep SCUBA-2 450-\mu m observations overlapping the UDS and COSMOS fields and covering 210 sq. arcmin to a typical depth of \sigma 450=1.5 mJy. Reliable cross identification are found for 58 sources (84 per cent) in Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR data. The photometric redshift distribution (dN/dz) of 450\mu m-selected sources is presented, showing a broad peak in the redshift range 1<z<3, and a median of z=1.4. Combining the SCUBA-2 photometry with Herschel SPIRE data from HerMES, the submm spectral energy distribution (SED) is examined via the use of modified blackbody fits, yielding aggregate values for the IR luminosity, dust temperature and emissivity of <LIR>=10^12 +/- 0.8 L_sol, <T_D>=42 +/- 11 K and <\beta_D>=1.6 +/- 0.5, respectively. The relationship between these SED parameters and the physical properties of galaxies is investigated, revealing correlations between T_D and LIR and between \beta_D and both stellar mass and effective radius. The connection between star formation rate and stellar mass is explored, with 24 per cent of 450 \mu m sources found to be ``star-bursts'', i.e. displaying anomalously high specific SFRs. However, both the number density and observed properties of these ``star-burst'' galaxies are found consistent with the population of normal star-forming galaxies.
  • Context. This paper discusses the sensitivity of water lines to chemical processes and radiative transfer for the protoplanetary disk around TW Hya. The study focuses on the Herschel spectral range in the context of new line detections with the PACS instrument from the Gas in Protoplanetary Systems project (GASPS). Aims. The paper presents an overview of the chemistry in the main water reservoirs in the disk around TW Hya. It discusses the limitations in the interpretation of observed water line fluxes. Methods. ... (abbreviated) Results. We report new line detections of p-H2O (3_22-2_11) at 89.99 micron and CO J=18-17 at 144.78 micron for the disk around TW Hya. Disk modeling shows that the far-IR fine structure lines ([OI], [CII]) and molecular submm lines are very robust to uncertainties in the chemistry, while the water line fluxes can change by factors of a few. The water lines are optically thick, sub-thermally excited and can couple to the background continuum radiation field. The low-excitation water lines are also sensitive to uncertainties in the collision rates, e.g. with neutral hydrogen. The gas temperature plays an important role for the [OI] fine structure line fluxes, the water line fluxes originating from the inner disk as well as the high excitation CO, CH+ and OH lines. Conclusions. Due to their sensitivity on chemical input data and radiative transfer, water lines have to be used cautiously for understanding details of the disk structure. Water lines covering a wide range of excitation energies provide access to the various gas phase water reservoirs (inside and outside the snow line) in protoplanetary disks and thus provide important information on where gas-phase water is potentially located. Experimental and/or theoretical collision rates for H2O with atomic hydrogen are needed to diminish uncertainties from water line radiative transfer.