• We investigate the magnetic field and temperature dependence of the single-electron spin lifetime in silicon quantum dots and find a lifetime of 2.8 ms at a temperature of 1.1 K. We develop a model based on spin-valley mixing and find that Johnson noise and two-phonon processes limit relaxation at low and high temperature respectively. We also investigate the effect of temperature on charge noise and find a linear dependence up to 4 K. These results contribute to the understanding of relaxation in silicon quantum dots and are promising for qubit operation at elevated temperatures.
  • Quantum computers promise to solve certain problems that are intractable for classical computers, such as factoring large numbers and simulating quantum systems. To date, research in quantum computer engineering has focused primarily at opposite ends of the required system stack: devising high-level programming languages and compilers to describe and optimize quantum algorithms, and building reliable low-level quantum hardware. Relatively little attention has been given to using the compiler output to fully control the operations on experimental quantum processors. Bridging this gap, we propose and build a prototype of a flexible control microarchitecture supporting quantum-classical mixed code for a superconducting quantum processor. The microarchitecture is based on three core elements: (i) a codeword-based event control scheme, (ii) queue-based precise event timing control, and (iii) a flexible multilevel instruction decoding mechanism for control. We design a set of quantum microinstructions that allows flexible control of quantum operations with precise timing. We demonstrate the microarchitecture and microinstruction set by performing a standard gate-characterization experiment on a transmon qubit.
  • We present two pulse schemes for actively depleting measurement photons from a readout resonator in the nonlinear dispersive regime of circuit QED. One method uses digital feedback conditioned on the measurement outcome while the other is unconditional. In the absence of analytic forms and symmetries to exploit in this nonlinear regime, the depletion pulses are numerically optimized using the Powell method. We shorten the photon depletion time by more than six inverse resonator linewidths compared to passive depletion by waiting. We quantify the benefit by emulating an ancilla qubit performing repeated quantum parity checks in a repetition code. Fast depletion increases the mean number of cycles to a spurious error detection event from order 1 to 75 at a 1 microsecond cycle time.
  • We demonstrate the active suppression of transmon qubit dephasing induced by dispersive measurement, using parametric amplification and analog feedback. By real-time processing of the homodyne record, the feedback controller reverts the stochastic quantum phase kick imparted by the measurement on the qubit. The feedback operation matches a model of quantum trajectories with measurement efficiency $\tilde{\eta} \approx 0.5$, consistent with the result obtained by postselection. We overcome the bandwidth limitations of the amplification chain by numerically optimizing the signal processing in the feedback loop and provide a theoretical model explaining the optimization result.
  • The stochastic evolution of quantum systems during measurement is arguably the most enigmatic feature of quantum mechanics. Measuring a quantum system typically steers it towards a classical state, destroying any initial quantum superposition and any entanglement with other quantum systems. Remarkably, the measurement of a shared property between non-interacting quantum systems can generate entanglement starting from an uncorrelated state. Of special interest in quantum computing is the parity measurement, which projects a register of quantum bits (qubits) to a state with an even or odd total number of excitations. Crucially, a parity meter must discern the two parities with high fidelity while preserving coherence between same-parity states. Despite numerous proposals for atomic, semiconducting, and superconducting qubits, realizing a parity meter creating entanglement for both even and odd measurement results has remained an outstanding challenge. We realize a time-resolved, continuous parity measurement of two superconducting qubits using the cavity in a 3D circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture and phase-sensitive parametric amplification. Using postselection, we produce entanglement by parity measurement reaching 77% concurrence. Incorporating the parity meter in a feedback-control loop, we transform the entanglement generation from probabilistic to fully deterministic, achieving 66% fidelity to a target Bell state on demand. These realizations of a parity meter and a feedback-enabled deterministic measurement protocol provide key ingredients for active quantum error correction in the solid state.
  • Quasiparticle excitations adversely affect the performance of superconducting devices in a wide range of applications. They limit the sensitivity of photon detectors in astronomy, the accuracy of current sources in metrology, the cooling power of micro-refrigerators, and could break the topological protection of Majorana qubits. In superconducting circuits for quantum information processing, tunneling of quasiparticles across Josephson junctions constitutes a decoherence mechanism. As relaxation and pure dephasing times of transmon-type charge qubits now reach 100 microseconds, understanding whether quasiparticle tunneling may already bottleneck coherence is of high interest. We integrate recent advances in qubit readout and feedback control in circuit quantum electrodynamics to perform the first real-time observation of quasiparticle tunneling in a transmon qubit. We demonstrate quasiparticle-tunneling contributions to qubit relaxation and pure dephasing in the millisecond range. Thus, quasiparticle tunneling will not limit coherence for at least one order of magnitude beyond the state of the art.
  • Controlled manipulation of quantum states is central to studying natural and artificial quantum systems. If a quantum system consists of interacting sub-units, the nature of the coupling may lead to quantum levels with degenerate energy differences. This degeneracy makes frequency-selective quantum operations impossible. For the prominent group of transversely coupled two-level systems, i.e. qubits, we introduce a method to selectively suppress one transition of a degenerate pair while coherently exciting the other, effectively creating artificial selection rules. It requires driving two qubits simultaneously with the same frequency and specified relative amplitude and phase. We demonstrate our method on a pair of superconducting flux qubits. It can directly be applied to the other superconducting qubits, and to any other qubit type that allows for individual driving. Our results provide a single-pulse controlled-NOT gate for the class of transversely coupled qubits.
  • We present experimental results on the crosstalk between two AC-operated dispersive bifurcation detectors, implemented in a circuit for high-fidelity readout of two strongly coupled flux qubits. Both phase-dependent and phase-independent contributions to the crosstalk are analyzed. For proper tuning of the phase the measured crosstalk is 0.1 % and the correlation between the measurement outcomes is less than 0.05 %. These results show that bifurcative readout provides a reliable and generic approach for multi-partite correlation experiments.
  • We fabricated and tested a squelch circuit consisting of a copper powder filter with an embedded Josephson junction connected to ground. For small signals (squelch-ON), the small junction inductance attenuates strongly from DC to at least 1 GHz, while for higher frequencies dissipation in the copper powder increases the attenuation exponentially with frequency. For large signals (squelch-OFF) the circuit behaves as a regular metal powder filter. The measured ON/OFF ratio is larger than 50dB up to 50 MHz. This squelch can be applied in low temperature measurement and control circuitry for quantum nanostructures such as superconducting qubits and quantum dots.
  • We employ a cryogenic High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifier to increase the bandwidth of a charge detection setup with a quantum point contact (QPC) charge sensor. The HEMT is operating at 1K and the circuit has a bandwidth of 1 MHz. The noise contribution of the HEMT at high frequencies is only a few times higher than that of the QPC shot noise. We use this setup to monitor single-electron tunneling to and from an adjacent quantum dot and we measure fluctuations in the dot occupation as short as 400 nanoseconds, 20 times faster than in previous work.
  • We have studied low-frequency resistance fluctuations in shadow-evaporated Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junctions. Between 300 K and 5 K the spectral density follows a 1/f-law. Below 5 K, individual defects distort the 1/f-shape of the spectrum. The spectral density decreases linearly with temperature between 150 K and 1 K and saturates below 0.8 K. At 4.2 K, the spectral density is about two orders of magnitude lower than expected from a recent survey [D. J. Van Harlingen et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 064510 (2004)]. Due to the saturation below 0.8 K the estimated qubit dephasing times at 100 mK are only about two times longer than calculated by Van Harlingen et al.
  • We present a new readout method for a superconducting flux qubit, based on the measurement of the Josephson inductance of a superconducting quantum interference device that is inductively coupled to the qubit. The intrinsic flux detection efficiency and back-action are suitable for a fast and nondestructive determination of the quantum state of the qubit, as needed for readout of multiple qubits in a quantum computer. We performed spectroscopy of a flux qubit and we measured relaxation times of the order of 80 $\mu s$.