• The upcoming NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will obtain space-based uninterrupted light curves for a large sample of bright white dwarfs distributed across the entire sky, providing a very rich resource for asteroseismological studies and the search for transits from planetary debris. We have compiled an all-sky catalogue of ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometry as well as proper motions, which we propose as an essential tool for the preliminary identification and characterisation of potential targets. We present data for 1864 known white dwarfs and 305 high-probability white dwarf candidates brighter than 17 mag. We describe the spectroscopic follow-up of 135 stars, of which 82 are white dwarfs and 25 are hot subdwarfs. The new confirmed stars include six pulsating white dwarf candidates (ZZ Cetis), and nine white dwarf binaries with a cool main-sequence companion. We identify one star with a spectroscopic distance of only 25 pc from the Sun. Around the time TESS is launched, we foresee that all white dwarfs in this sample will have trigonometric parallaxes measured by the ESA Gaia mission next year.
  • Massive OB stars are critical to the ecology of galaxies, and yet our knowledge of OB stars in the Milky Way, fainter than $V \sim 12$, remains patchy. Data from the VST Photometric H$\alpha$ Survey (VPHAS+) permit the construction of the first deep catalogues of blue excess-selected OB stars, without neglecting the stellar field. A total of 14900 candidates with 2MASS cross-matches are blue-selected from a 42 square-degree region in the Galactic Plane, capturing the Carina Arm over the Galactic longitude range $282^{\circ} \lesssim \ell \lesssim 293^{\circ}$. Spectral energy distribution fitting is performed on these candidates' combined VPHAS+ $u,g,r,i$ and 2MASS $J,H,K$ magnitudes. This delivers: effective temperature constraints, statistically separating O from early-B stars; high-quality extinction parameters, $A_0$ and $R_V$ (random errors typically $< 0.1$). The high-confidence O-B2 candidates number 5915 and a further 5170 fit to later B spectral type. Spectroscopy of 276 of the former confirms 97% of them. The fraction of emission line stars among all candidate B stars is 7--8% . Greyer ($R_V > 3.5$) extinction laws are ubiquitous in the region, over the distance range 2.5--3 kpc to $\sim$10~kpc. Near prominent massive clusters, $R_V$ tends to rise, with particularly large and chaotic excursions to $R_V \sim 5$ seen in the Carina Nebula. The data reveal a hitherto unnoticed association of 108 O-B2 stars around the O5If$+$ star LSS 2063 ($\ell = 289.77^{\circ}$, $b = -1.22^{\circ}$). Treating the OB star scale-height as a constant within the thin disk, we find an orderly mean relation between extinction ($A_0$) and distance in the Galactic longitude range, $287.6^{\circ} < \ell < 293.5^{\circ}$, and infer the subtle onset of thin-disk warping. A halo around NGC 3603, roughly a degree in diameter, of $\sim$500 O-B2 stars with $4 < A_0 (\rm{mag}) < 7$ is noted.
  • We investigated the prospects for systematic searches of white dwarfs at low Galactic latitudes, using the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) H$\alpha$ Photometric Survey of the Galactic plane and Bulge (VPHAS+). We targeted 17 white dwarf candidates along sightlines of known open clusters, aiming to identify potential cluster members. We confirmed all the 17 white dwarf candidates from blue/optical spectroscopy, and we suggest five of them to be likely cluster members. We estimated progenitor ages and masses for the candidate cluster members, and compared our findings to those for other cluster white dwarfs. A white dwarf in NGC 3532 is the most massive known cluster member (1.13 M$_{\odot}$), likely with an oxygen-neon core, for which we estimate an $8.8_{-4.3}^{+1.2}$ M$_{\odot}$ progenitor, close to the mass-divide between white dwarf and neutron star progenitors. A cluster member in Ruprecht 131 is a magnetic white dwarf, whose progenitor mass exceeded 2-3 M$_{\odot}$. We stress that wider searches, and improved cluster distances and ages derived from data of the ESA Gaia mission, will advance the understanding of the mass-loss processes for low- to intermediate-mass stars.
  • We report the discovery of an L dwarf companion to the A3V star \beta{} Circini. VVV J151721.49-585131.5, or \beta{} Cir B, was identified in a proper motion and parallax catalogue of the Vista Variables in the V\'{i}a L\'{a}ctea survey as having near infrared luminosity and colour indicative of an early L dwarf, and a proper motion and parallax consistent with that of \beta{} Cir. The projected separation of $\sim$3.6' corresponds to $6656$ au, which is unusually wide. The most recent published estimate of the age of the primary combined with our own estimate based on newer isochrones yields an age of $370-500$ Myr. The system therefore serves as a useful benchmark at an age greater than that of the Pleiades brown dwarfs and most other young L dwarf benchmarks. We have obtained a medium resolution echelle spectrum of the companion which indicates a spectral type of L1.0$\pm$0.5 and lacks the typical signatures of low surface gravity seen in younger brown dwarfs. This suggests that signs of low surface gravity disappear from the spectra of early L dwarfs by an age of $\sim370-500$ Myr, as expected from theoretical isochrones. The mass of \beta{} Cir B is estimated from the BHAC15 isochrones as $0.056\pm0.007$ M$_{\odot}$.
  • O and early B stars are at the apex of galactic ecology, but in the Milky Way, only a minority of them may yet have been identified. We present the results of a pilot study to select and parametrise OB star candidates in the Southern Galactic plane, down to a limiting magnitude of $g=20$. A 2 square-degree field capturing the Carina Arm around the young massive star cluster, Westerlund 2, is examined. The confirmed OB stars in this cluster are used to validate our identification method, based on selection from the $(u-g, g-r)$ diagram for the region. Our Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting method combines VPHAS+ $u, g, r, i$ with published $J, H, K$ photometry in order to derive posterior probability distributions of the stellar parameters $\log(\rm T_{\rm eff})$ and distance modulus, together with the reddening parameters $A_0$ and $R_V$. The stellar parameters are sufficient to confirm OB status while the reddening parameters are determined to a precision of $\sigma(A_0)\sim0.09$ and $\sigma(R_V)\sim0.08$. There are 489 objects that fit well as new OB candidates, earlier than $\sim$B2. This total includes 74 probable massive O stars, 5 likely blue supergiants and 32 reddened subdwarfs. This increases the number of previously known and candidate OB stars in the region by nearly a factor of 10. Most of the new objects are likely to be at distances between 3 and 6 kpc. We have confirmed the results of previous studies that, at these longer distances, these sight lines require non-standard reddening laws with $3.5<R_V<4$.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims to find sdBs with compact companions like massive white dwarfs, neutron stars or black holes. Here we provide classifications, atmospheric parameters and a complete radial velocity (RV) catalogue containing 1914 single measurements for an sample of 177 hot subluminous stars discovered based on SDSS DR7. 110 stars show significant RV variability, while 67 qualify as candidates. We constrain the fraction of close massive compact companions {of hydrogen-rich hot subdwarfs} in our sample to be smaller than $\sim1.3\%$, which is already close to the theoretical predictions. However, the sample might still contain such binaries with longer periods exceeding $\sim8\,{\rm d}$. We detect a mismatch between the $\Delta RV_{\rm max}$-distribution of the sdB and the more evolved sdOB and sdO stars, which challenges our understanding of their evolutionary connection. Furthermore, irregular RV variations of unknown origin with amplitudes of up to $\sim180\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$ on timescales of years, days and even hours have been detected in some He-sdO stars. They might be connected to irregular photometric variations in some cases.
  • We report the discovery of WTS-1b, the first extrasolar planet found by the WFCAM Transit Survey, which began observations at the 3.8-m United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) in August 2007. Light curves comprising almost 1200 epochs with a photometric precision of better than 1 per cent to J ~ 16 were constructed for ~60000 stars and searched for periodic transit signals. For one of the most promising transiting candidates, high-resolution spectra taken at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) allowed us to estimate the spectroscopic parameters of the host star, a late-F main sequence dwarf (V=16.13) with possibly slightly subsolar metallicity, and to measure its radial velocity variations. The combined analysis of the light curves and spectroscopic data resulted in an orbital period of the substellar companion of 3.35 days, a planetary mass of 4.01 +- 0.35 Mj and a planetary radius of 1.49+0.16-0.18 Rj. WTS-1b has one of the largest radius anomalies among the known hot Jupiters in the mass range 3-5 Mj. The high irradiation from the host star ranks the planet in the pM class.
  • A member of the Local Group, IC 1613 is a gas rich irregular dwarf galaxy that appears to have formed stars continuously over the last 10 Gyr and is relatively independent of external influences from other galaxies. This paper aims to study the spatial distribution of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population in IC 1613 and its metallicity. Using WFCAM on UKIRT, high quality JHK photometry of an area of 0.8 deg^2 centered on IC 1613 was obtained. The data have been used to isolate the C- and M-type components of the AGB population and using their number ratio, C/M, a global mean metallicity has been derived. The metallicity and the TRGB magnitude have been studied as a function of distance from the galactic centre and as a function of azimuthal angle. The tip of the RGB (TRGB) has been found at K_0 = 18.25 +/- 0.15 mag. The colour separation between the C- and M-type components of the AGB population has been located at (J-K) = 1.15 +/- 0.05 mag, giving a global C/M ratio of 0.52 +/- 0.04 and from this an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -1.26 +/- 0.07 dex has been calculated. The AGB population has been detected out to a radial distance of 4.5 kpc in the de-projected plane of the galaxy. The measured TRGB is consistent with previous measurements and no significant variation is detected in the TRGB or in metallicity either with galactocentric distance or azimuthal angle.
  • The VISTA near-infrared YJKs survey of the Magellanic Clouds system (VMC) has entered its core phase: about 40% of the observations across the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC), the Magellanic Bridge and Stream have already been secured and the data are processed and analysed regularly. The initial analyses, concentrated in the first two completed tiles in the LMC (6_6 including 30 Doradus and 8_8 including the South Ecliptic Pole), show the superior quality of the data. The depth of the VMC survey allows the derivation of the star formation history (SFH) with unprecedented quality compared to previous wide-area surveys while reddening maps of high angular resolution are constructed using red clump stars. The multi-epoch Ks-band data reveal tight period-luminosity relations for variable stars and they permit the measurement of accurate proper motions of the stellar populations. The VMC survey continues to acquire data that will address many issues in the field of star and galaxy evolution.
  • Context. White dwarfs can be used to study the structure and evolution of the Galaxy by analysing their luminosity function and initial mass function. Among them, the very cool white dwarfs provide the information for the early ages of each population. Because white dwarfs are intrinsically faint only the nearby (about 20 pc) sample is reasonably complete. The Gaia space mission will drastically increase the sample of known white dwarfs through its 5-6 years survey of the whole sky up to magnitude V = 20-25. Aims. We provide a characterisation of Gaia photometry for white dwarfs to better prepare for the analysis of the scientific output of the mission. Transformations between some of the most common photometric systems and Gaia passbands are derived. We also give estimates of the number of white dwarfs of the different galactic populations that will be observed. Methods. Using synthetic spectral energy distributions and the most recent Gaia transmission curves, we computed colours of three different types of white dwarfs (pure hydrogen, pure helium, and mixed composition with H/He= 0.1). With these colours we derived transformations to other common photometric systems (Johnson-Cousins, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and 2MASS). We also present numbers of white dwarfs predicted to be observed by Gaia. Results. We provide relationships and colour-colour diagrams among different photometric systems to allow the prediction and/or study of the Gaia white dwarf colours. We also include estimates of the number of sources expected in every galactic population and with a maximum parallax error. Gaia will increase the sample of known white dwarfs tenfold to about 200 000. Gaia will be able to observe thousands of very cool white dwarfs for the first time, which will greatly improve our understanding of these stars and early phases of star formation in our Galaxy.
  • We have observed the post common envelope binary WD0137-349 in the near infrared $J$, $H$ and $K$ bands and have determined that the photometry varies on the system period (116 min). The amplitude of the variability increases with increasing wavelength, indicating that the brown dwarf in the system is likely being irradiated by its 16500 K white dwarf companion. The effect of the (primarily) UV irradiation on the brown dwarf atmosphere is unknown, but it is possible that stratospheric hazes are formed. It is also possible that the brown dwarf (an L-T transition object) itself is variable due to patchy cloud cover. Both these scenarios are discussed, and suggestions for further study are made.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are the most important standard candles for measuring the expansion history of the universe. The thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf can explain their observed properties, but neither the progenitor systems nor any stellar remnants have been conclusively identified. Underluminous SN Ia have been proposed to originate from a so-called double-detonation of a white dwarf. After a critical amount of helium is deposited on the surface through accretion from a close companion, the helium is ignited causing a detonation wave that triggers the explosion of the white dwarf itself. We have discovered both shallow transits and eclipses in the tight binary system CD-30 11223 composed of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf and a hot helium star, allowing us to determine its component masses and fundamental parameters. In the future the system will transfer mass from the helium star to the white dwarf. Modelling this process we find that the detonation in the accreted helium layer is sufficiently strong to trigger the explosion of the core. The helium star will then be ejected at so large a velocity that it will escape the Galaxy. The predicted properties of this remnant are an excellent match to the so-called hypervelocity star US 708, a hot, helium-rich star moving at more than 750 km/s, sufficient to leave the Galaxy. The identification of both progenitor and remnant provides a consistent picture of the formation and evolution of underluminous type Ia supernovae.
  • A direct observation of the spiral structure of the Galaxy is hindered by our position in the middle of the Galactic plane. We propose a method based on the analysis of the birthplaces of high Galactic latitude runaway stars to map the spiral arms and determine their dynamics. As a proof of concept, the method is applied to a local sample of early-type stars and a sample of runaways stars to obtain estimates of the pattern speed and the spiral arm's phase angle. We also estimate the performance of this method once the data gathered by Gaia, in particular for runaway stars observed on the other side of the Galaxy, is available.
  • We have spectroscopically confirmed a brown dwarf mass companion to the hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf NLTT5306. The white dwarf's atmospheric parameters were measured using Sloan Digital Sky Survey and X-Shooter spectroscopy as T_eff=7756+/-35K and log(g)=7.68+/-0.08, giving a mass for the primary of M_WD=0.44+/-0.04 M_sun, at a distance of 71+/-4 pc with a cooling age of 710+/-50 Myr. The existence of the brown dwarf secondary was confirmed through the near-infrared arm of the X-Shooter data and a spectral type of dL4-dL7 was estimated using standard spectral indices. Combined radial velocity measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, X-Shooter and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's High Resolution Spectrograph of the white dwarf gives a minimum mass of 56+/-3 M_jup for the secondary, confirming the substellar nature. The period of the binary was measured as 101.88+/-0.02 mins using both the radial velocity data and i'-band variability detected with the INT. This variability indicates 'day' side heating of the brown dwarf companion. We also observe H{\alpha} emission in our higher resolution data in phase with the white dwarf radial velocity, indicating this system is in a low level of accretion, most likely via a stellar wind. This system represents the shortest period white dwarf + brown dwarf binary and the secondary has survived a stage of common envelope evolution, much like its longer period counterpart, WD0137-349. Both systems likely represent bona-fide progenitors of cataclysmic variables with a low mass white dwarf and a brown dwarf donor.
  • We report the discovery of WTS-1b, the first extrasolar planet found by the WFCAM Transit Survey, which began observations at the 3.8-m United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. Light curves comprising almost 1200 epochs with a photometric precision of better than 1 per cent to J=16 were constructed for 60000 stars and searched for periodic transit signals. For one of the most promising transiting candidates, high-resolution spectra taken at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope allowed us to estimate the spectroscopic parameters of the host star, a late-F main sequence dwarf (V=16.13) with possibly slightly subsolar metallicity, and to measure its radial velocity variations. The combined analysis of the light curves and spectroscopic data resulted in an orbital period of the substellar companion of 3.35 days, a planetary mass of 4.01+-0.35 Mj and a planetary radius of 1.49+-0.17 Rj. WTS-1b has one of the largest radius anomalies among the known hot Jupiters in the mass range 3-5 Mj.
  • There is a striking and unexplained dearth of brown dwarf companions in close orbits (< 3AU) around stars more massive than the Sun, in stark contrast to the frequency of stellar and planetary companions. Although rare and relatively short-lived, these systems leave detectable evolutionary end points in the form of white dwarf - brown dwarf binaries and these remnants can offer unique insights into the births and deaths of their parent systems. We present the discovery of a close (orbital separation ~ 0.006 AU) substellar companion to a massive white dwarf member of the Praesepe star cluster. Using the cluster age and the mass of the white dwarf we constrain the mass of the white dwarf progenitor star to lie in the range 3.5 - 3.7 Msun (B9). The high mass of the white dwarf means the substellar companion must have been engulfed by the B star's envelope while it was on the late asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Hence, the initial separation of the system was ~2 AU, with common envelope evolution reducing the separation to its current value. The initial and final orbital separations allow us to constrain the combination of the common envelope efficiency (alpha) and binding energy parameters (lambda) for the AGB star to alpha lambda ~3. We examine the various formation scenarios and conclude that the substellar object was most likely to have been captured by the white dwarf progenitor early in the life of the cluster, rather than forming in situ.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely close, eclipsing binary system. A white dwarf is orbited by a core He-burning compact hot subdwarf star with a period as short as $\simeq0.04987 {\rm d}$ making this system the most compact hot subdwarf binary discovered so far. The subdwarf will start to transfer helium-rich material on short timescales of less than $50 {\rm Myr}$. The ignition of He-burning at the surface may trigger carbon-burning in the core although the WD is less massive than the Chandrasekhar limit ($>0.74\,M_{\rm \odot}$) making this binary a possible progenitor candidate for a supernova type Ia event.
  • We report the identification of LSR J0745+2627 in the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) as a cool white dwarf with kinematics and age compatible with the thick-disk/halo population. LSR J0745+2627 has a high proper motion (890 mas/yr) and a high reduced proper motion value in the J band (H_J=21.87). We show how the infrared-reduced proper motion diagram is useful for selecting a sample of cool white dwarfs with low contamination. LSR J0745+2627 is also detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We have spectroscopically confirmed this object as a cool white dwarf using X-Shooter on the Very Large Telescope. A detailed analysis of its spectral energy distribution reveals that its atmosphere is compatible with a pure-H composition model with an effective temperature of 3880+-90 K. This object is the brightest pure-H ultracool white dwarf (Teff<4000 K) ever identified. We have constrained the distance (24-45 pc), space velocities and age considering different surface gravities. The results obtained suggest that LSR J0745+2627 belongs to the thick-disk/halo population and is also one of the closest ultracool white dwarfs.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions (white dwarfs with masses $M>1.0 {\rm M_{\odot}}$, neutron stars or black holes). The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution calculations and some candidate systems have been found. We identified $\simeq1100$ hot subdwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Stars with high velocities have been reobserved and individual SDSS spectra have been analysed. About 70 radial velocity variable subdwarfs have been selected as good candidates for follow-up time resolved spectroscopy to derive orbital parameters and photometric follow-up to search for features like eclipses in the light curves. Up to now we found nine close binary sdBs with short orbital periods ranging from $\simeq0.07 {\rm d}$ to $1.5 {\rm d}$. Two of them are eclipsing binaries with companions that are most likely of substellar nature.
  • NGC 6822 is an irregular dwarf galaxy and part of the Local Group. Its close proximity and apparent isolation provide a unique opportunity to study galactic evolution without any obvious strong external influences. This paper aims to study the spatial distribution of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population and metallicity in NGC 6822. Using deep, high quality JHK photometry, taken with WFCAM on UKIRT, carbon- and oxygen-rich AGB stars have been isolated. The ratio between their number, the C/M ratio, has then been used to derive the [Fe/H] abundance across the galaxy. The tip of the red giant branch is located at K0 = 17.41 \pm 0.11 mag and the colour separation between carbon- and oxygen-rich AGB stars is at (J - K)0 = 1.20 \pm 0.03 mag (i.e. (J - K)2MAS S {\guillemotright} 1.28 mag). A C/M ratio of 0.62 \pm 0.03 has been derived in the inner 4 kpc of the galaxy, which translates into an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -1.29\pm0.07 dex. Variations of these parameters were investigated as a function of distance from the galaxy centre and azimuthal angle. The AGB population of NGC 6822 has been detected out to a radius of 4 kpc giving a diameter of 56 arcmin. It is metal-poor, but there is no obvious gradient in metallicity with either radial distance from the centre or azimuthal angle. The detected spread in the TRGB magnitude is consistent with that of a galaxy surrounded by a halo of old stars. The C/M ratio has the potential to be a very useful tool for the determination of metallicity in resolved galaxies but a better calibration of the C/M vs. [Fe/H] relation and a better understanding of the sensitivities of the C/M ratio to stellar selection criteria is first required.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions (massive white dwarfs M>1.0 Msun, neutron stars or stellar mass black holes). The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution theory and some candidate systems have been found. We classified about 1400 hot subdwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by colour selection and visual inspection of their spectra. Stars with high velocities have been reobserved and individual SDSS spectra have been analysed. In total 201 radial velocity variable subdwarfs have been discovered and about 140 of them have been selected as good candidates for follow-up time resolved spectroscopy to derive their orbital parameters and photometric follow-up to search for features like eclipses in the light curves. Up to now we found seven close binary sdBs with short orbital periods ranging from 0.21 d to 1.5 d and two eclipsing binaries with companions that are most likely of substellar nature. A new pulsating sdB in a close binary system has been discovered as well.
  • We measured projected rotational velocities of more than a hundred apparently single sdBs. A comparison is made with sdB stars in binary systems with orbits so wide, that tidal interaction becomes negligible. All of these stars are slow rotators (vsini<10 km/s) with EC 22081-1916 being the only exception. This single star has the highest projected rotational velocity ever measured for an sdB (vsini=163 km/s) and might have been formed by a merger event. The merger of a red-giant core and a low-mass, main-sequence star or substellar object during a common envelope phase fits particularly well with observations. The implications of our results for hot subdwarf formation are briefly discussed.
  • During the past 20 years, the idea that non-spherical planetary nebulae (PN) may need a binary or planetary interaction to be shaped was discussed by various authors. It is now generally agreed that the varied morphologies of PN cannot be fully explained solely by single star evolution. Observationally, more binary central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN) have been discovered, opening new possibilities to understand the connections between binarity and morphology. So far, \simeq 45 binary CSPN have been detected, most being close systems detected via flux variability. To determine the PN binary fraction, one needs a method to detect wider binaries. We present here recent results obtained with the various techniques described, concentrating on binary infrared excess observations aimed at detecting binaries of any separation.
  • The multi-epoch YJKs sub-arcsecond photometry of the VMC survey provides a long anticipated deep near-infrared (NIR) window into further understanding the stellar populations of the Magellanic Clouds. The first year of observations consisted of six tiles covering ~9% of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) survey region and contains 102 objects previously classified as planetary nebulae (PNe). A large proportion of the sample were found to be contaminated by non-PNe. These initial results underline the importance of establishing a clean catalogue of LMC PNe before they are applied in areas such as the planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) and searches for binary central stars. As the VMC survey progresses it will play a fundamental role in cleaning extant PN catalogues and a complementary role in the discovery of new PNe.
  • The VISTA Magellanic Cloud (VMC) survey is assembling a deep, multi-epoch atlas of YJKs photometry across the Magellanic Clouds. Prior to the VMC survey only the brightest Magellanic Cloud PNe (MCPNe) were accessible at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. It is now possible for the first time to assemble the NIR properties of MCPNe and to identify contaminating non-PNe mimics which are best revealed at NIR wavelengths (e.g. HII regions and symbiotic stars). To maintain the unique scientific niche that MCPNe occupy these contaminants must be removed. Here we conduct a VMC-led, multi-wavelength study of 102 objects previously classified as PNe that are located within the first six VMC tiles observed. We present images, photometry, lightcurves, diagnostic colour-colour diagrams and spectral energy distributions used to analyse the entire sample. At least five PNe have newly resolved nebula morphologies, a task previously only possible with the HST. A total 45/67 (67%) of Reid & Parker (RP) catalogued objects were reclassified as non-PNe, most of which were located in the vicinity of 30 Doradus. This sample included 16 field stars, 5 emission line stars, 19 HII regions, 4 symbiotic star candidates and 1 young stellar object. We discuss possible selection effects responsible for their inclusion in the RP catalogue and the implications for binary central star surveys targeting LMC PNe. A total of five new LMC symbiotic star candidates identified, compared to eight previously known, underlines the important role the VMC survey will have in advancing Magellanic symbiotic star studies.