• We report six new inflated hot Jupiters (HATS-25b through HATS-30b) discovered using the HATSouth global network of automated telescopes. The planets orbit stars with $V$ magnitudes in the range $\sim 12-14$ and have masses in the largely populated $0.5M_J-0.7M_J$ region of parameter space but span a wide variety of radii, from $1.17R_J$ to $1.75 R_J$. HATS-25b, HATS-28b, HATS-29b and HATS-30b are typical inflated hot Jupiters ($R_p = 1.17-1.26R_J$) orbiting G-type stars in short period ($P=3.2-4.6$ days) orbits. However, HATS-26b ($R_p = 1.75R_J$, $P = 3.3024$ days) and HATS-27b ($R_p=1.50R_J$, $P=4.6370$ days) stand out as highly inflated planets orbiting slightly evolved F stars just after and in the turn-off points, respectively, which are among the least dense hot Jupiters, with densities of $0.153$ g cm$^{-3}$ and $0.180$ g cm$^{-3}$, respectively. All the presented exoplanets but HATS-27b are good targets for future atmospheric characterization studies, while HATS-27b is a prime target for Rossiter-McLaughlin monitoring in order to determine its spin-orbit alignment given the brightness ($V = 12.8$) and stellar rotational velocity ($v \sin i \approx 9.3$ km/s) of the host star. These discoveries significantly increase the number of inflated hot Jupiters known, contributing to our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for hot Jupiter inflation.
  • We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets from the HATSouth survey. HATS-11, a V=14.1 G0-star shows a periodic 12.9 mmag dip in its light curve every 3.6192 days and a radial velocity variation consistent with a Keplerian orbit. HATS-11 has a mass of 1.000 $\pm$ 0.060 M$_{\odot}$, a radius of 1.444 $\pm$ 0.057 M$_{\odot}$ and an effective temperature of 6060 $\pm$ 150 K, while its companion is a 0.85 $\pm$ 0.12 M$_J$, 1.510 $\pm$ 0.078 R$_J$ planet in a circular orbit. HATS-12 shows a periodic 5.1 mmag flux decrease every 3.1428 days and Keplerian RV variations around a V=12.8 F-star. HATS-12 has a mass of 1.489 $\pm$ 0.071 M$_{\odot}$, a radius of 2.21 $\pm$ 0.21 R$_{\odot}$, and an effective temperature of 6408 $\pm$ 75 K. For HATS-12, our measurements indicate that this is a 2.38 $\pm$ 0.11 M$_J$, 1.35 $\pm$ 0.17 R$_J$ planet in a circular orbit. Both host stars show sub-solar metallicity of -0.390 $\pm$ 0.060 dex and -0.100 $\pm$ 0.040 dex, respectively and are (slightly) evolved stars. In fact, HATS-11 is amongst the most metal-poor and, HATS-12 is amongst the most evolved stars hosting a hot Jupiter planet. Importantly, HATS-11 and HATS-12 have been observed in long cadence by Kepler as part of K2 campaign 7 (EPIC216414930 and EPIC218131080 respectively).
  • We report the discovery of HATS-15 b and HATS-16 b, two massive transiting extrasolar planets orbiting evolved ($\sim 10$ Gyr) main-sequence stars. The planet HATS-15 b, which is hosted by a G9V star ($V=14.8$ mag), is a hot Jupiter with mass of $2.17\pm0.15\, M_{\mathrm{J}}$ and radius of $1.105\pm0.0.040\, R_{\mathrm{J}}$, and completes its orbit in nearly 1.7 days. HATS-16 b is a very massive hot Jupiter with mass of $3.27\pm0.19\, M_{\mathrm{J}}$ and radius of $1.30\pm0.15\, R_{\mathrm{J}}$; it orbits around its G3 V parent star ($V=13.8$ mag) in $\sim2.7$ days. HATS-16 is slightly active and shows a periodic photometric modulation, implying a rotational period of 12 days which is unexpectedly short given its isochronal age. This fast rotation might be the result of the tidal interaction between the star and its planet.
  • We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-3b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a V=12.4 F-dwarf star. HATS-3b has a period of P = 3.5479d, mass of Mp = 1.07MJ, and radius of Rp = 1.38RJ. Given the radius of the planet, the brightness of the host star, and the stellar rotational velocity (vsini = 9.0km/s), this system will make an interesting target for future observations to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and determine its spin-orbit alignment. We detail the low/medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy that we are now using to deal with large numbers of transiting planet candidates produced by the HATSouth survey. We show that this important step in discovering planets produces logg and Teff parameters at a precision suitable for efficient candidate vetting, as well as efficiently identifying stellar mass eclipsing binaries with radial velocity semi-amplitudes as low as 1 km/s.
  • First identified from the HATNet wide-field photometric survey, these candidate transiting planets were then followed-up with a variety of photometric observations. Determining the planetary nature of the objects and characterizing the parameters of the systems were mainly done with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93m telescope at OHP and the TRES spectrograph at the 1.5m telescope at FLWO. HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b are typical hot Jupiters on circular orbits around early-G/late-F main sequence host stars, with periods of 4.641876\pm0.000032 and 3.332688\pm0.000016 days, masses of 0.975\pm0.126 and 0.660\pm0.083 Mjup, and radii of 1.277\pm0.149 and 1.283+0.057-0.034 Rjup, respectively. These discoveries increase the sample of planets with measured mean densities, which is needed to constrain theories of planetary interiors and atmospheres. Moreover, their hosts are relatively bright (V < 13.5) facilitating further follow-up studies.