• Pulsars in relativistic binary systems have emerged as fantastic natural laboratories for testing theories of gravity, the most prominent example being the double pulsar, PSR J0737$-$3039. The HTRU-South Low Latitude pulsar survey represents one of the most sensitive blind pulsar surveys taken of the southern Galactic plane to date, and its primary aim has been the discovery of new relativistic binary pulsars. Here we present our binary pulsar searching strategy and report on the survey's flagship discovery, PSR J1757$-$1854. A 21.5-ms pulsar in a relativistic binary with an orbital period of 4.4 hours and an eccentricity of 0.61, this double neutron star (DNS) system is the most accelerated pulsar binary known, and probes a relativistic parameter space not yet explored by previous pulsar binaries.
  • We report the discovery of PSR J1757$-$1854, a 21.5-ms pulsar in a highly-eccentric, 4.4-h orbit around a neutron star (NS) companion. PSR J1757$-$1854 exhibits some of the most extreme relativistic parameters of any known pulsar, including the strongest relativistic effects due to gravitational-wave (GW) damping, with a merger time of 76 Myr. Following a 1.6-yr timing campaign, we have measured five post-Keplerian (PK) parameters, yielding the two component masses ($m_\text{p}=1.3384(9)\,\text{M}_\odot$ and $m_\text{c}=1.3946(9)\,\text{M}_\odot$) plus three tests of general relativity (GR), which the theory passes. The larger mass of the NS companion provides important clues regarding the binary formation of PSR J1757$-$1854. With simulations suggesting 3-$\sigma$ measurements of both the contribution of Lense-Thirring precession to the rate of change of the semi-major axis and the relativistic deformation of the orbit within $\sim7-9$ years, PSR J1757$-$1854 stands out as a unique laboratory for new tests of gravitational theories.
  • We report the discovery of four Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) in the ongoing SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts (SUPERB) at the Parkes Radio Telescope: FRBs 150610, 151206, 151230 and 160102. Our real-time discoveries have enabled us to conduct extensive, rapid multi-messenger follow-up at 12 major facilities sensitive to radio, optical, X-ray, gamma-ray photons and neutrinos on time scales ranging from an hour to a few months post-burst. No counterparts to the FRBs were found and we provide upper limits on afterglow luminosities. None of the FRBs were seen to repeat. Formal fits to all FRBs show hints of scattering while their intrinsic widths are unresolved in time. FRB 151206 is at low Galactic latitude, FRB 151230 shows a sharp spectral cutoff, and FRB 160102 has the highest dispersion measure (DM = $2596.1\pm0.3$ pc cm$^{-3}$) detected to date. Three of the FRBs have high dispersion measures (DM >$1500$ pc cm$^{-3}$), favouring a scenario where the DM is dominated by contributions from the Intergalactic Medium. The slope of the Parkes FRB source counts distribution with fluences $>2$ Jyms is $\alpha=-2.2^{+0.6}_{-1.2}$ and still consistent with a Euclidean distribution ($\alpha=-3/2$). We also find that the all-sky rate is $1.7^{+1.5}_{-0.9}\times10^3$FRBs/($4\pi$ sr)/day above $\sim2$ Jyms and there is currently no strong evidence for a latitude-dependent FRB sky-rate.
  • We describe the Survey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts (SUPERB), an ongoing pulsar and fast transient survey using the Parkes radio telescope. SUPERB involves real-time acceleration searches for pulsars and single-pulse searches for pulsars and fast radio bursts. We report on the observational setup, data analysis, multi-wavelength/messenger connections, survey sensitivities to pulsars and fast radio bursts and the impact of radio frequency interference. We further report on the first 10 pulsars discovered in the project. Among these is PSR~J1306$-$40, a millisecond pulsar in a binary system where it appears to be eclipsed for a large fraction of the orbit. PSR~J1421$-$4407 is another binary millisecond pulsar; its orbital period is $30.7$ days. This orbital period is in a range where only highly eccentric binaries are known, and expected by theory; despite this its orbit has an eccentricity of $10^{-5}$.
  • We report the discovery and the results of follow-up timing observations of PSR J2045+3633 and PSR J2053+4650, two binary pulsars found in the Northern High Time Resolution Universe pulsar survey being carried out with the Effelsberg radio telescope. Having spin periods of 31.7 ms and 12.6 ms respectively, and both with massive white dwarf companions, $M_{c}\, > \, 0.8\, M_{\odot}$, the pulsars can be classified as mildly recycled. PSR J2045+3633 is remarkable due to its orbital period (32.3 days) and eccentricity $e\, = \, 0.01721244(5)$ which is among the largest ever measured for this class. After almost two years of timing the large eccentricity has allowed the measurement of the rate of advance of periastron at the 5-$\sigma$ level, 0.0010(2)$^\circ~\rm yr^{-1}$. Combining this with a detection of the orthometric amplitude of the Shapiro delay, we obtained the following constraints on the component masses (within general relativity): $M_{p}\, = \, 1.33^{+0.30}_{-0.28}\, M_{\odot}$, and $M_{c}\, = \, 0.94^{+0.14}_{-0.13}\, M_{\odot}$. PSR J2053+4650 has a 2.45-day circular orbit inclined to the plane of the sky at an angle $i\, = \, 85.0^{+0.8}_{-0.9}\,{^\circ}$. In this nearly edge-on case the masses can be obtained from the Shapiro delay alone. Our timing observations resulted in a significant detection of this effect giving: $M_{p}\, = \, 1.40^{+0.21}_{-0.18}\, M_{\odot}$, and $M_{c}\, = \, 0.86^{+0.07}_{-0.06}\, M_{\odot}$.
  • In Torne et al. (2015), we showed detections of SGR J1745-2900 up to 225 GHz (1.33 mm); at that time the highest radio frequency detection of pulsar emission. In this work, we present the results of new observations of the same magnetar with detections up to 291 GHz (1.03 mm), together with evidence of linear polarization in its millimetre emission. SGR J1745-2900 continues to show variability and is, on average, a factor $\sim$4 brighter in the millimetre band than in our observations of July 2014. The new measured spectrum is slightly inverted, with $\left<\alpha\right> = +0.4\pm0.2$ (for $S_{\nu} \propto \nu^{\alpha})$. However, the spectrum does not seem to be well described by a single power law, which might be due to the intrinsic variability of the source, or perhaps a turn-up somewhere between 8.35 and 87 GHz. These results may help us to improve our still incomplete model of pulsar emission and, in addition, they further support the search for and study of pulsars located at the Galactic Centre using millimetre wavelengths.
  • In recent years, millisecond duration radio signals originating from distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called Fast Radio Bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. While every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, none before now have had a redshift measurement, due to the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we present the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting $\sim 6$ days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be $z=0.492\pm0.008$. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionised baryons in the intergalactic medium of $\Omega_{\mathrm{IGM}}=4.9 \pm 1.3\%$, in agreement with the expectation from WMAP, and including all of the so-called "missing baryons". The $\sim6$-day transient is largely consistent with a short gamma-ray burst radio afterglow, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting there are at least two classes of bursts.
  • We report on simultaneous observations of the magnetar SGR J1745-2900 at frequencies $\nu = 2.54$ to $225\,\rm{GHz}$ using the Nancay 94-m equivalent, Effelsberg 100-m, and IRAM 30-m radio telescopes. We detect SGR J1745-2900 up to 225 GHz, the highest radio frequency detection of pulsed emission from a neutron star to date. Strong single pulses are also observed from 4.85 up to 154 GHz. At the millimetre band we see significant flux density and spectral index variabilities on time scales of tens of minutes, plus variability between days at all frequencies. Additionally, SGR J1745-2900 was observed at a different epoch at frequencies 296 to 472 GHz using the APEX 12-m radio telescope, with no detections. Over the period MJD 56859.83-56862.93 the fitted spectrum yields a spectral index of $\left<\alpha\right> = -0.4 \pm 0.1$ for a reference flux density $\left< S_{154} \right> = 1.1 \pm 0.2\rm{\,mJy}$ (with $S_{\nu} \propto {\nu}^{\alpha})$, a flat spectrum alike those of the other radio-loud magnetars. These results show that strongly magnetized neutron stars can be effective radio emitters at frequencies notably higher to what was previously known and that pulsar searches in the Galactic Centre are possible in the millimetre band.
  • We present initial results from the low-latitude Galactic plane region of the High Time Resolution Universe pulsar survey conducted at the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. We discuss the computational challenges arising from the processing of the terabyte-sized survey data. Two new radio interference mitigation techniques are introduced, as well as a partially-coherent segmented acceleration search algorithm which aims to increase our chances of discovering highly-relativistic short-orbit binary systems, covering a parameter space including potential pulsar-black hole binaries. We show that under a constant acceleration approximation, a ratio of data length over orbital period of ~0.1 results in the highest effectiveness for this search algorithm. From the 50 per cent of data processed thus far, we have re-detected 435 previously known pulsars and discovered a further 60 pulsars, two of which are fast-spinning pulsars with periods less than 30ms. PSR J1101-6424 is a millisecond pulsar whose heavy white dwarf (WD) companion and short spin period of 5.1ms indicate a rare example of full-recycling via Case A Roche lobe overflow. PSR J1757-27 appears to be an isolated recycled pulsar with a relatively long spin period of 17ms. In addition, PSR J1244-6359 is a mildly-recycled binary system with a heavy WD companion, PSR J1755-25 has a significant orbital eccentricity of 0.09, and PSR J1759-24 is likely to be a long-orbit eclipsing binary with orbital period of the order of tens of years. Comparison of our newly-discovered pulsar sample to the known population suggests that they belong to an older population. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our current pulsar detection yield is as expected from population synthesis.
  • The discovery and timing of radio pulsars within the Galactic centre is a fundamental aspect of the SKA Science Case, responding to the topic of "Strong Field Tests of Gravity with Pulsars and Black Holes" (Kramer et al. 2004; Cordes et al. 2004). Pulsars have in many ways proven to be excellent tools for testing the General theory of Relativity and alternative gravity theories (see Wex (2014) for a recent review). Timing a pulsar in orbit around a companion, provides a unique way of probing the relativistic dynamics and spacetime of such a system. The strictest tests of gravity, in strong field conditions, are expected to come from a pulsar orbiting a black hole. In this sense, a pulsar in a close orbit ($P_{\rm orb}$ < 1 yr) around our nearest supermassive black hole candidate, Sagittarius A* - at a distance of ~8.3 kpc in the Galactic centre (Gillessen et al. 2009a) - would be the ideal tool. Given the size of the orbit and the relativistic effects associated with it, even a slowly spinning pulsar would allow the black hole spacetime to be explored in great detail (Liu et al. 2012). For example, measurement of the frame dragging caused by the rotation of the supermassive black hole, would allow a test of the "cosmic censorship conjecture." The "no-hair theorem" can be tested by measuring the quadrupole moment of the black hole. These are two of the prime examples for the fundamental studies of gravity one could do with a pulsar around Sagittarius A*. As will be shown here, SKA1-MID and ultimately the SKA will provide the opportunity to begin to find and time the pulsars in this extreme environment.
  • The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will make ground breaking discoveries in pulsar science. In this chapter we outline the SKA surveys for new pulsars, as well as how we will perform the necessary follow-up timing observations. The SKA's wide field-of-view, high sensitivity, multi-beaming and sub-arraying capabilities, coupled with advanced pulsar search backends, will result in the discovery of a large population of pulsars. These will enable the SKA's pulsar science goals (tests of General Relativity with pulsar binary systems, investigating black hole theorems with pulsar-black hole binaries, and direct detection of gravitational waves in a pulsar timing array). Using SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW we will survey the Milky Way to unprecedented depth, increasing the number of known pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. SKA2 will potentially find all the Galactic radio-emitting pulsars in the SKA sky which are beamed in our direction. This will give a clear picture of the birth properties of pulsars and of the gravitational potential, magnetic field structure and interstellar matter content of the Galaxy. Targeted searches will enable detection of exotic systems, such as the ~1000 pulsars we infer to be closely orbiting Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Centre. In addition, the SKA's sensitivity will be sufficient to detect pulsars in local group galaxies. To derive the spin characteristics of the discoveries we will perform live searches, and use sub-arraying and dynamic scheduling to time pulsars as soon as they are discovered, while simultaneously continuing survey observations. The large projected number of discoveries suggests that we will uncover currently unknown rare systems that can be exploited to push the boundaries of our understanding of astrophysics and provide tools for testing physics, as has been done by the pulsar community in the past.
  • The anticipated discovery of a pulsar in orbit with a black hole is expected to provide a unique laboratory for black hole physics and gravity. In this context, the next generation of radio telescopes, like the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), with their unprecedented sensitivity, will play a key role. In this paper, we investigate the capability of future radio telescopes to probe the spacetime of a black hole and test gravity theories, by timing a pulsar orbiting a stellar-mass-black-hole (SBH). Based on mock data simulations, we show that a few years of timing observations of a sufficiently compact pulsar-SBH (PSR-SBH) system with future radio telescopes would allow precise measurements of the black hole mass and spin. A measurement precision of one per cent can be expected for the spin. Measuring the quadrupole moment of the black hole, needed to test GR's no-hair theorem, requires extreme system configurations with compact orbits and a large SBH mass. Additionally, we show that a PSR-SBH system can lead to greatly improved constraints on alternative gravity theories even if they predict black holes (practically) identical to GR's. This is demonstrated for a specific class of scalar-tensor theories. Finally, we investigate the requirements for searching for PSR-SBH systems. It is shown that the high sensitivity of the next generation of radio telescopes is key for discovering compact PSR-SBH systems, as it will allow for sufficiently short survey integration times.
  • We present temporal scattering measurements of single pulses and average profiles of PSR J1745--2900, a magnetar recently discovered only 3 arcsec away from Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), from 1.2 - 18.95 GHz using the Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope, the Nan\c{c}ay Decimetric Radio Telescope, and the Jodrell Bank Lovell Telescope. Single pulse analysis shows that the integrated pulse profile above 2 GHz is dominated by pulse jitter, while below 2 GHz the pulse profile shape is dominated by scattering. The high dispersion measure and rotation measure of the magnetar suggest that it is close to Sgr A* (within ~0.1 pc). This is the first object in the GC with both pulse broadening and angular broadening measurements. We measure a pulse broadening spectral index of alpha = -3.8 +/- 0.2 and a pulse broadening time scale at 1 GHz of tau_GHz = 1.3 +/- 0.2 s, which is several orders of magnitude lower than the scattering predicted by the NE2001 model (Cordes and Lazio 2002). If this scattering timescale is representative of the GC as a whole, then previous surveys should have detected many pulsars. The lack of detections implies either our understanding of scattering in the GC is incomplete or there are fewer pulsars in the GC than previously predicted. Given that magnetars are a rare class of radio pulsar, we believe that there are many canonical and millisecond pulsars in the GC, and not surprisingly, scattering regions in the GC have complex spatial structures.
  • We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of approximately 17000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop/s. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, of which 18 were isolated pulsars, and six were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (approximately 420 pc/cc). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.
  • The centre of our Milky Way harbours the closest candidate for a supermassive black hole. The source is thought to be powered by radiatively inefficient accretion of gas from its environment. This form of accretion is a standard mode of energy supply for most galactic nuclei. X-ray measurements have already resolved a tenuous hot gas component from which it can be fed. However, the magnetization of the gas, a crucial parameter determining the structure of the accretion flow, remains unknown. Strong magnetic fields can influence the dynamics of the accretion, remove angular momentum from the infalling gas, expel matter through relativistic jets and lead to the observed synchrotron emission. Here we report multi-frequency measurements with several radio telescopes of a newly discovered pulsar close to the Galactic Centre and show that its unusually large Faraday rotation indicates a dynamically relevant magnetic field near the black hole. If this field is accreted down to the event horizon it provides enough magnetic flux to explain the observed emission from the black hole, from radio to X-rays.
  • We report on the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing ephemerides provided by various radio observatories. We also present confirmation of the gamma-ray pulsations from a sixth source, PSR J2051-0827. Five of these six MSPs are in binary systems: PSRs J1713+0747, J1741+1351, J1600-3053 and the two black widow binary pulsars PSRs J0610-2100 and 2051-0827. The only isolated MSP is the nearby PSR J1024-0719, which is also known to emit X-rays. We present X-ray observations in the direction of PSRs J1600-3053 and J2051-0827. While the latter is firmly detected, we an only give upper limits for the X-ray flux of the former. There are no dedicated X-ray observations available for the other 3 objects. The MSPs mentioned above, together with most of the MSPs detected by Fermi, are used to put together a sample of 30 gamma-ray MSPs which is used to study the morphology and phase connection of radio and gamma-ray pulse profiles. We show that MSPs with pulsed gamma-ray emission which is phase aligned with the radio emission present the steepest radio spectra and the largest magnetic fields at the light cylinder among all MSPs. As well, we also observe a trend towards very low, or undetectable, radio linear polarisation levels. These properties could be attributed to caustic radio emission produced at a range of different altitudes in the magnetosphere. We note that most of these characteristics are also observed in the Crab pulsar, the only other radio pulsar known to exhibit phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray emission.
  • A fully coherent acceleration search algorithm has been applied to the Parkes multi- beam pulsar survey of the Galactic plane to search for previously undiscovered relativistic binary pulsars. The search has resulted in the discovery of 16 pulsars including a binary millisecond pulsar and an intermittent pulsar. Despite a number of promising candidates there have been no new discoveries of relativistic binary pulsars. Here we detail the acceleration search performed in our analysis and present coherent timing solutions for each of pulsars discovered. In light of the lack of discoveries of relativistic binary pulsars, we also discuss the technique of acceleration searching and its effectiveness in finding these systems.
  • Using the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope operating at 1.36 GHz, we have performed a targeted radio pulsar survey of 289 unassociated gamma-ray sources discovered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi satellite and published in the 1FGL catalogue (Abdo et al., 2010). This survey resulted in the discovery of millisecond pulsar J1745+1017, which resides in a short-period binary system with a low-mass companion, Mmin ~ 0.0137 Msun, indicative of `Black Widow' type systems. A two-year timing campaign has produced a refined radio ephemeris, accurate enough to allow for phase-folding of the LAT photons, resulting in the detection of a dual-peaked gamma-ray light-curve, proving that PSR J1745+1017 is the source responsible for the gamma-ray emission seen in 1FGL J1745.5 + 1018 (2FGL J1745.6+1015; Nolan et al., 2012). We find the gamma-ray spectrum of PSR J1745+1017 to be well modelled by an exponentially-cut-off power law with cut-off energy 3.2 GeV and photon index 1.6. The observed sources are known to contain a further 10 newly discovered pulsars which were undetected in this survey. Our radio observations of these sources are discussed and in all cases limiting flux densities are calculated. The reasons behind the seemingly low yield of discoveries are also discussed.
  • The discovery of a pulsar (PSR) in orbit around a black hole (BH) is expected to provide a superb new probe of relativistic gravity and BH properties. Apart from a precise mass measurement for the BH, one could expect a clean verification of the dragging of space-time caused by the BH spin. In order to measure the quadrupole moment of the BH for testing the no-hair theorem of general relativity (GR), one has to hope for a sufficiently massive BH. In this respect, a PSR orbiting the super-massive BH in the center of our Galaxy would be the ultimate laboratory for gravity tests with PSRs. But even for gravity theories that predict the same properties for BHs as GR, a PSR-BH system would constitute an excellent test system, due to the high grade of asymmetry in the strong field properties of these two components. Here we highlight some of the potential gravity tests that one could expect from different PSR-BH systems, utilizing present and future radio telescopes, like FAST and SKA.
  • Radio pulsars in relativistic binary systems are unique tools to study the curved space-time around massive compact objects. The discovery of a pulsar closely orbiting the super-massive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy, Sgr A*, would provide a superb test-bed for gravitational physics. To date, the absence of any radio pulsar discoveries within a few arc minutes of Sgr A* has been explained by one principal factor: extreme scattering of radio waves caused by inhomogeneities in the ionized component of the interstellar medium in the central 100 pc around Sgr A*. Scattering, which causes temporal broadening of pulses, can only be mitigated by observing at higher frequencies. Here we describe recent searches of the Galactic centre region performed at a frequency of 18.95 GHz with the Effelsberg radio telescope.
  • We report the discovery of nine previously unknown gamma-ray pulsars in a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found with a novel hierarchical search method originally developed for detecting continuous gravitational waves from rapidly rotating neutron stars. Designed to find isolated pulsars spinning at up to kHz frequencies, the new method is computationally efficient, and incorporates several advances, including a metric-based gridding of the search parameter space (frequency, frequency derivative and sky location) and the use of photon probability weights. The nine pulsars have spin frequencies between 3 and 12 Hz, and characteristic ages ranging from 17 kyr to 3 Myr. Two of them, PSRs J1803-2149 and J2111+4606, are young and energetic Galactic-plane pulsars (spin-down power above 6e35 erg/s and ages below 100 kyr). The seven remaining pulsars, PSRs J0106+4855, J0622+3749, J1620-4927, J1746-3239, J2028+3332, J2030+4415, J2139+4716, are older and less energetic; two of them are located at higher Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10 deg). PSR J0106+4855 has the largest characteristic age (3 Myr) and the smallest surface magnetic field (2e11 G) of all LAT blind-search pulsars. PSR J2139+4716 has the lowest spin-down power (3e33 erg/s) among all non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars ever found. Despite extensive multi-frequency observations, only PSR J0106+4855 has detectable pulsations in the radio band. The other eight pulsars belong to the increasing population of radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars.
  • Radio pulsar surveys are producing many more pulsar candidates than can be inspected by human experts in a practical length of time. Here we present a technique to automatically identify credible pulsar candidates from pulsar surveys using an artificial neural network. The technique has been applied to candidates from a recent re-analysis of the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey resulting in the discovery of a previously unidentified pulsar.