• We analyse a sample of 8 highly magnified galaxies at redshift 0.6<z<1.5 observed with MUSE, exploring the resolved properties of these galaxies at sub-kiloparsec scales. Combining multi-band HST photometry and MUSE spectra, we derive the stellar mass, global star formation rates, extinction and metallicity from multiple nebular lines, concluding that our sample is representative of z~1 star-forming galaxies. We derive the 2D kinematics of these galaxies from the [OII] emission and model it with a new method that accounts for lensing effects and fits multiple images simultaneously. We use these models to calculate the 2D beam-smearing correction and derive intrinsic velocity dispersion maps. We find them to be fairly homogeneous, with relatively constant velocity dispersions between 15 - 80 km/s and Gini coefficient of <0.3. We do not find any evidence for higher (or lower) velocity dispersions at the positions of bright star-forming clumps. We derive resolved maps of dust attenuation and attenuation-corrected star formation rates from emission lines for two objects in the sample. We use this information to study the relation between resolved star formation rate and velocity dispersion. We find that these quantities are not correlated, and the high-velocity dispersions found for relatively low star-forming densities seems to indicate that, at sub-kiloparsec scales, turbulence in high-z discs is mainly dominated by gravitational instability rather than stellar feedback.
  • We tested the performance of photometric redshifts for galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep field down to 30th magnitude. We compared photometric redshift estimates from three spectral fitting codes from the literature (EAZY, BPZ and BEAGLE) to high quality redshifts for 1227 galaxies from the MUSE integral field spectrograph. All these codes can return photometric redshifts with bias |Dzn|=|z-z_phot|/(1+z)<0.05 down to F775W=30 and spectroscopic incompleteness is unlikely to strongly modify this statement. We have, however, identified clear systematic biases in the determination of photometric redshifts: in the 0.4<z<1.5 range, photometric redshifts are systematically biased low by as much as Dzn=-0.04 in the median, and at z>3 they are systematically biased high by up to Dzn = 0.05, an offset that can in part be explained by adjusting the amount of intergalactic absorption applied. In agreement with previous studies we find little difference in the performance of the different codes, but in contrast to those we find that adding extensive ground-based and IRAC photometry actually can worsen photo-z performance for faint galaxies. We find an outlier fraction, defined through |Dzn|>0.15, of 8% for BPZ and 10% for EAZY and BEAGLE, and show explicitly that this is a strong function of magnitude. While this outlier fraction is high relative to numbers presented in the literature for brighter galaxies, they are very comparable to literature results when the depth of the data is taken into account. Finally, we demonstrate that while a redshift might be of high confidence, the association of a spectrum to the photometric object can be very uncertain and lead to a contamination of a few percent in spectroscopic training samples that do not show up as catastrophic outliers, a problem that must be tackled in order to have sufficiently accurate photometric redshifts for future cosmological surveys.
  • [abridged] The Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope surveys of the Frontier Fields (FF) provide extremely deep images around six massive, strong-lensing clusters of galaxies. The ALMA FF survey aims to cover the same fields at 1.1mm, with maps reaching (unlensed) sensitivities of $<$70$\mu$Jy, in order to explore the properties of background dusty star-forming galaxies. We report on the multi-wavelength photometric analysis of all 12 significantly detected ($>$5$\sigma$) sources in the first three FF clusters observed by ALMA, based on data from Hubble and Spitzer, the VLT and Herschel. We measure the total photometry in all available bands and determine the photometric redshifts and the physical properties of the counterparts via SED-fitting. In particular, we carefully estimate the FIR photometry using 1.1mm priors to limit the misidentification of blended FIR counterparts, which strongly affect some flux estimates in previous FIR catalogs. We identify robust near-infrared (NIR) counterparts for all 11 sources with K$_s$ detection, the majority of which are quite red, with eight having $F814W-K_s\gtrsim 4$ and five having $F160W-[4.5]\gtrsim3$. From the FIR point of view, all our objects have $z_{phot}$$\sim$1--3, whereas based on the optical SED one object prefers a high-$z$ solution ($z\geq\ $7). Five objects among our sample have spectroscopic redshifts from the GLASS survey for which we can reproduce their SEDs with existing templates. This verification confirms the validity of our photometric redshift methodology. The mean redshift of our sample is $z_{phot}$=1.99$\pm$0.27. All 1.1mm selected objects are massive (10.0$<\log[M_{\star}(M_{\odot})]<$ 11.5), with high star formation rates ($<\log[SFR(M_{\odot}/yr)]> \approx$1.6) and high dust contents (8.1 $<\log[M_{dust} (M_{\odot})]<$8.8), consistent with previous ALMA surveys.
  • We study the evolution of spectral early-type galaxies in clusters, groups and the field up to redshift 0.9 using the EDisCS dataset. We measure Re, Ie, and sigma for 154 cluster and 68 field galaxies. We study the evolution of the zero point of the fundamental plane (FP) and confirm results in the literature, but now also for the low cluster velocity dispersion regime. The mass-to-light ratio varies as Delta log M/L_B=(-0.54+-0.01)z=(-1.61+-0.01)log(1+z) in clusters, independent of their velocity dispersion. The evolution is stronger (Delta log M/L_B=(-0.76+-0.01)z=(-2.27+-0.03)log(1+z)) for field galaxies. The FP residuals correlate with galaxy mass and become progressively negative at low masses. The effect is visible at z>=0.7 for cluster galaxies and at z>=0.5 for field galaxies. We investigate the size evolution of our galaxy sample. We find that the half-luminosity radius for a galaxy with a dynamical or stellar mass of 2x10^11 Msol varies as (1+z)^{-1.0+-0.3} for both cluster and field galaxies. At the same time, stellar velocity dispersions grow with redshift, as (1+z)^{0.59+-0.10} at constant dynamical mass, and as (1+z)^{0.34+- 0.14} at constant stellar mass. The measured size evolution reduces to Re (1+z)^{-0.5+- 0.2} and sigma (1+z)^{0.41+-0.08}, at fixed dynamical masses, and Re (1+z)^{-0.68+-0.4} and sigma (1+z)^{0.19+-0.10}, at fixed stellar masses, when the progenitor bias (galaxies that locally are of spectroscopic early-type, but not very old, disappear from the EDisCS high-redshift sample; these galaxies tend to be large in size) is taken into account. Taken together, the variations in size and velocity dispersion imply that the luminosity evolution with redshift derived from the zero point of the FP is somewhat milder than that derived without taking these variations into account.
  • In this paper we present the results of our search for and study of $z \gtrsim 6$ galaxy candidates behind the third Frontier Fields (FF) cluster, MACSJ0717.5+3745, and its parallel field, combining data from Hubble and Spitzer. We select 39 candidates using the Lyman Break technique, for which the clear non-detection in optical make the extreme mid-$z$ interlopers hypothesis unlikely. We also take benefit from $z \gtrsim 6$ samples selected using previous Frontier Fields datasets of Abell 2744 and MACS0416 to improve the constraints on the properties of very high-redshift objects. We compute the redshift and the physical properties, such emission lines properties, star formation rate, reddening, and stellar mass for all Frontier Fields objects from their spectral energy distribution using templates including nebular emission lines. We study the relationship between several physical properties and confirm the trend already observed in previous surveys for evolution of star formation rate with galaxy mass, and between the size and the UV luminosity of our candidates. The analysis of the evolution of the UV Luminosity Function with redshift seems more compatible with an evolution of density. Moreover, no robust $z\ge$8.5 object is selected behind the cluster field, and few $z$$\sim$9 candidates have been selected in the two previous datasets from this legacy survey, suggesting a strong evolution in the number density of galaxies between $z$$\sim$8 and 9. Thanks to the use of the lensing cluster, we study the evolution of the star formation rate density produced by galaxies with L$>$0.03L$^{\star}$, and confirm the strong decrease observed between $z$$\sim$8 and 9.
  • We present the results obtained with MUSE on the core of the lensing cluster A1689. Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central region, allowing us to conduct a complete census on both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources, identified based on their spectral features without preselection. We investigate the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them based on photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Among them, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission-lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. 17 sources in total are found at z > 3 based on their Lyman-alpha emission, with Lyman-alpha luminosities ranging between 40.5 < log(Ly{\alpha}) < 42.5 after correction for magnification. This sample is particularly sensitive to the slope of the LF toward the faintest-end. The density of sources obtained in this survey is consistent with a steep value of {\alpha} < -1.5, although this result still needs further investigation. These results illustrate the efficiency of MUSE in the characterization of lensing clusters on one hand, and the study of faint and distant populations of galaxies on the other hand. In particular, our current survey of lensing clusters should provide a unique census of sources responsible for the reionization in a representative volume at z ~ 4-7.
  • (abridged) We report the discovery of PHz G95.5-61.6, a complex structure detected in emission in the Planck all-sky survey that corresponds to two over-densities of high-redshift galaxies. This is the first source from the Planck catalogue of high-z candidates that has been completely characterised with follow-up observations from the optical to the sub-millimetre domain. Herschel/SPIRE observations at 250, 350 and 500 microns reveal the existence of five sources producing a 500 microns emission excess that spatially corresponds to the candidate proto-clusters discovered by Planck. Further observations at CFHT in the optical bands (g and i) and in the near infrared (J, H and K_s), plus mid infrared observations with IRAC/Spitzer (at 3.6 and 4.5 microns) confirm that the sub-mm red excess is associated with an over-density of colour-selected galaxies. Follow-up spectroscopy of 13 galaxies with VLT/X-Shooter establishes the existence of two high-z structures: one at z~1.7 (three confirmed member galaxies), the other at z~2.0 (six confirmed members). This double structure is also seen in the photometric redshift analysis of a sample of 127 galaxies located inside a circular region of 1'-radius containing the five Herschel/SPIRE sources, where we found a double-peaked excess of galaxies at z~1.7 and z~2.0 with respect to the surrounding region. These results suggest that PHz G95.5-61.6 corresponds to two accreting nodes, not physically linked to one another, embedded in the large scale structure of the Universe at z~2 and along the same line-of-sight. In conclusion, the data, methods and results illustrated in this pilot project confirm that Planck data can be used to detect the emission from clustered, dusty star forming galaxies at high-z, and, thus, to pierce through the early growth of cluster-scale structures.
  • We present a thorough characterization of a large sample of 183 extreme emission-line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift 0.11 < z < 0.93 selected from the 20k zCOSMOS Bright Survey because of their unusually large emission line equivalent widths. We use multiwavelength COSMOS photometry, HST-ACS I-band imaging and optical zCOSMOS spectroscopy to derive the main global properties of EELGs, such as sizes, masses, SFRs, reliable metallicities from both "direct" and "strong-line" methods. The EELGs are compact (R_50 ~ 1.3 kpc), low-mass (log(M*/Msol)~7-10) galaxies forming stars at unusually high specific SFR (log(sSFR/yr) up to ~ -7) compared to main sequence SFGs of the same stellar mass and redshift. At UV wavelengths, the EELGs are luminous and show high surface brightness and include strong Ly$\alpha$ emitters, as revealed by GALEX spectroscopy. We show that zCOSMOS EELGs are high-ionization, low-metallicity systems, with median 12+log(O/H)=8.16, including a handful of extremely metal-deficient galaxies (<10% solar). While ~80% of the EELGs show non-axisymmetric morphologies, including clumpy and tadpole galaxies, we find that ~29% of them show additional low surface-brightness features, which strongly suggest recent or ongoing interactions. As star-forming dwarfs in the local Universe, EELGs are most often found in relative isolation. While only very few EELGs belong to compact groups, almost one third of them are found in spectroscopically confirmed loose pairs or triplets. We conclude that EELGs are galaxies caught in a transient and probably early period of their evolution, where they are efficiently building-up a significant fraction of their present-day stellar mass in an ongoing galaxy-wide starburst. Therefore, the EELGs constitute an ideal benchmark for comparison studies between low- and high-redshift low-mass star-forming galaxies.
  • (Abridged) The HST Frontier Fields project started at the end of 2013 with the aim of providing extremely deep images of 6 massive galaxy clusters. One of the main goals of this program is to push several telescopes to their limits in order to provide the best current view of the earliest stages of the Universe. We present a detailed analysis of $z$$\sim$8 objects behind the HFFs lensing cluster, MACS0416-2403, combining 0.3-1.6 $\mu$m imaging from HST, ground-based $K_s$ imaging from VLT HAWK-I, and 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m Spitzer Space Telescope. We apply the classical Lyman Break technique, combining non-detection criteria and color-selection. In order to avoid contamination by mid-$z$ interlopers, we require a strong break between optical and near infrared data. The luminosity function at $z$$\sim$8 is computed using a MC method taking advantage of the SED-fitting results. A piece of cautionary information is gleaned from new deep optical photometry of a previously identified $z$$\sim$8 galaxy in this cluster, which is now firmly detected as a mid-$z$ interloper with a strong $\approx1.5$ mag Balmer break (between F606W and F125W). Using the SED of this interloper, we estimate the contamination rate of our MACS0416$-$2403 sample, as well as for previous samples in Abell 2744 based on HFF data. Our selection recovers 4 robust objects with m$_{F160W}$ ranging from 26.0 to 27.9 AB and located in modest amplification regions ($\mu<$2.4). Two of the objects display a secondary break between the IRAC 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m bands which could be associated to the Balmer break or emission lines at $z$$\sim$8. The candidates generally have star formation rates around $\sim$10 M$_{\odot}$/yr and sizes ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 kpc, in good agreement with previous observations and expectations for objects in the early Universe.
  • We analyzed the Einstein radius, $\theta_E$, in our sample of SL2S galaxy groups, and compared it with $R_A$ (the distance from the arcs to the center of the lens), using three different approaches: 1.- the velocity dispersion obtained from weak lensing assuming a Singular Isothermal Sphere profile ($\theta_{E,I}$), 2.- a strong lensing analytical method ($\theta_{E,II}$) combined with a velocity dispersion-concentration relation derived from numerical simulations designed to mimic our group sample, 3.- strong lensing modeling ($\theta_{E,III}$) of eleven groups (with four new models presented in this work) using HST and CFHT images. Finally, $R_A$ was analyzed as a function of redshift $z$ to investigate possible correlations with L, N, and the richness-to-luminosity ratio (N/L). We found a correlation between $\theta_{E}$ and $R_A$, but with large scatter. We estimate $\theta_{E,I}$ = (2.2 $\pm$ 0.9) + (0.7 $\pm$ 0.2)$R_A$, $\theta_{E,II}$ = (0.4 $\pm$ 1.5) + (1.1 $\pm$ 0.4)$R_A$, and $\theta_{E,III}$ = (0.4 $\pm$ 1.5) + (0.9 $\pm$ 0.3)$R_A$ for each method respectively. We found a weak evidence of anti-correlation between $R_A$ and $z$, with Log$R_A$ = (0.58$\pm$0.06) - (0.04$\pm$0.1)$z$, suggesting a possible evolution of the Einstein radius with $z$, as reported previously by other authors. Our results also show that $R_A$ is correlated with L and N (more luminous and richer groups have greater $R_A$), and a possible correlation between $R_A$ and the N/L ratio. Our analysis indicates that $R_A$ is correlated with $\theta_E$ in our sample, making $R_A$ useful to characterize properties like L and N (and possible N/L) in galaxy groups. Additionally, we present evidence suggesting that the Einstein radius evolves with $z$.
  • We present new observations of the lensing cluster SMACSJ2031.8-4036 obtained with the MUSE integral field spectrograph as part of its commissioning on the Very Large Telescope. By providing medium-resolution spectroscopy over the full 4750-9350 Angstroms domain and a 1x1 arcmin2 field of view, MUSE is ideally suited for identifying lensed galaxies in the cluster core, in particular multiple-imaged systems. We perform a redshift analysis of all sources in the datacube and identify a total of 12 systems ranging from $z=1.46$ to $z=6.4$, with all images of each system confirmed by a spectroscopic redshift. This allows us to accurately constrain the cluster mass profile in this region. We foresee that future MUSE observations of cluster cores should help us discover very faint Lyman-alpha emitters thanks to the strong magnification and the high sensitivity of this instrument.
  • Over the past 18 months we have revisited the science requirements for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These efforts span the full range of E-ELT science and include input from a broad cross-section of astronomers across the ESO partner countries. In this contribution we summarise the key cases relating to studies of high-redshift galaxies, galaxy evolution, and stellar populations, with a more expansive presentation of a new case relating to detection of exoplanets in stellar clusters. A general requirement is the need for two observational modes to best exploit the large (>40 sq. arcmin) patrol field of the E-ELT. The first mode ('high multiplex') requires integrated-light (or coarsely resolved) optical/near-IR spectroscopy of >100 objects simultaneously. The second ('high definition'), enabled by wide-field adaptive optics, requires spatially-resolved, near-IR of >10 objects/sub-fields. Within the context of the conceptual study for an ELT-MOS called MOSAIC, we summarise the top-level requirements from each case and introduce the next steps in the design process.
  • We studied the chronology of galactic bulge and disc formation by analysing the relative contributions of these components to the B-band rest-frame luminosity density at different epochs. We present the first estimate of the evolution of the fraction of rest-frame B-band light in galactic bulges and discs since redshift z~0.8. We performed a bulge-to-disc decomposition of HST/ACS images of 3266 galaxies in the zCOSMOS-bright survey with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.7 < z < 0.9. We find that the fraction of B-band light in bulges and discs is $(26 \pm 4)%$ and $(74 \pm 4)%$, respectively. When compared with rest-frame B-band measurements of galaxies in the local Universe in the same mass range ($10^{9} M_{\odot}\lessapprox M \lessapprox 10^{11.5} M_{\odot}$), we find that the B-band light in discs decreases by ~30% from z~0.7-0.9 to z~0, while the light from the bulge increases by ~30% over the same period of time. We interpret this evolution as the consequence of star formation and mass assembly processes, as well as morphological transformation, which gradually shift stars formed at half the age of the Universe from star-forming late-type/irregular galaxies toearlier types and ultimately into spheroids.
  • We present in this letter the first analysis of a z~8 galaxy candidate found in the Hubble and Spitzer imaging data of Abell 2744, as part of the Hubble Frontier Fields legacy program. We applied the most commonly-used methods to select exceptionally high-z galaxies by combining non-detection and color-criteria using seven HST bands. We used GALFIT on IRAC images for fitting and subtracting contamination of bright nearby sources. The physical properties have been inferred from SED-fitting using templates with and without nebular emission. This letter is focussed on the brightest candidate we found (m$_{F160W}$=26.2) over the 4.9 arcmin$^2$ field of view covered by the WFC3. It shows a non-detection in the ACS bands and at 3.6{\mu}m whereas it is clearly detected at 4.5{\mu}m with rather similar depths. This break in the IRAC data could be explained by strong [OIII]+H{\beta} lines at z~8 which contribute to the 4.5{\mu}m photometry. The best photo-z is found at z~8.0$^{+0.2}_{-0.5}$, although solutions at low-redshift (z~1.9) cannot be completely excluded, but they are strongly disfavoured by the SED-fitting work. The amplification factor is relatively small at {\mu}=1.49$\pm$0.02. The Star Formation Rate in this object is ranging from 8 to 60 Mo/yr, the stellar mass is in the order of M$_{\star}$=(2.5-10) x 10$^{9}$Mo and the size is r~0.35$\pm$0.15 kpc. This object is one of the first z~8 LBG candidates showing a clear break between 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m which is consistent with the IRAC properties of the first spectroscopically confirmed galaxy at a similar redshift. Due to its brightness, the redshift of this object could potentially be confirmed by near infrared spectroscopy with current 8-10m telescopes. The nature of this candidate will be revealed in the coming months with the arrival of new ACS and Spitzer data, increasing the depth at optical and near-IR wavelengths.
  • We describe the completed VIMOS VLT Deep Survey, and the final data release of 35016 galaxies and type-I AGN with measured spectroscopic redshifts up to redshift z~6.7, in areas 0.142 to 8.7 square degrees, and volumes from 0.5x10^6 to 2x10^7h^-3Mpc^3. We have selected samples of galaxies based solely on their i-band magnitude reaching i_{AB}=24.75. Spectra have been obtained with VIMOS on the ESO-VLT, integrating 0.75h, 4.5h and 18h for the Wide, Deep, and Ultra-Deep nested surveys. A total of 1263 galaxies have been re-observed independently within the VVDS, and from the VIPERS and MASSIV surveys. They are used to establish the redshift measurements reliability, to assess completeness, and to provide a weighting scheme taking into account the survey selection function. We describe the main properties of the VVDS samples, and the VVDS is compared to other spectroscopic surveys. In total we have obtained spectroscopic redshifts for 34594 galaxies, 422 type-I AGN, and 12430 Galactic stars. The survey has enabled to identify galaxies up to very high redshifts with 4669 redshifts in 1<=z_{spec}<=2, 561 in 2<=z_{spec}<=3 and 468 with z_{spec}>3, and specific populations like LAE have been identified out to z=6.62. We show that the VVDS occupies a unique place in the parameter space defined by area, depth, redshift coverage, and number of spectra. The VVDS provides a comprehensive survey of the distant universe, covering all epochs since z, or more than 12 Gyr of cosmic time, with a uniform selection, the largest such sample to date. A wealth of science results derived from the VVDS have shed new light on the evolution of galaxies and AGN, and their distribution in space, over this large cosmic time. A final public release of the complete VVDS spectroscopic redshift sample is available at http://cesam.lam.fr/vvds.
  • We identify 42 candidate groups lying between 1.8<z<3.0 from a sample of 3502 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the zCOSMOS-deep redshift survey within the same redshift interval. These systems contain three to five spectroscopic galaxies that lie within 500kpc in projected distance (in physical space) and within 700km/s in velocity. Based on extensive analysis of mock catalogues that have been generated from the Millennium simulation, we examine the likely nature of these systems at the time of observation, and what they will evolve into down to the present epoch. Although few of the "member" galaxies are likely to reside in the same halo at the epoch we observe them, 50% of the systems will eventually bring them all into the same halo, and almost all (93%) will have at least part of the member galaxies in the same halo by the present epoch. Most of the candidate groups can therefore be described as "proto-groups". An estimate of the overdensities is also consistent with the idea that these systems are being seen at the start of the assembly process. We also examine present-day haloes and ask whether their progenitors would have been seen amongst our candidate groups. For present-day haloes between 10^14-10^15Msun/h, 35% should have appeared amongst our candidate groups, and this would have risen to 70% if our survey had been fully-sampled, so we can conclude that our sample can be taken as representative of a large fraction of such systems. There is a clear excess of massive galaxies above 10^10Msun around the locations of the candidate groups in a large independent COSMOS photo-z sample, but we see no evidence in this latter data for any colour differentiation with respect to the field. This is however consistent with the idea that such differentiation arises in satellite galaxies, as indicated at z<1, if the candidate groups are indeed only starting to be assembled.
  • In the course of our 870um APEX/LABOCA follow up of the Herschel Lensing Survey we have detected a source in AS1063 (RXC J2248.7-4431), that has no counterparts in any of the Herschel PACS/SPIRE bands, it is a Herschel 'drop-out' with S_870/S_500>0.5. The 870um emission is extended and centered on the brightest cluster galaxy suggesting either a multiply imaged background source or substructure in the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) increment due to inhomogeneities in the hot cluster gas of this merging cluster. We discuss both interpretations with emphasis on the putative lensed source. Based on the observed properties and on our lens model we find that this source could be the first SMG with a moderate far infrared luminosity (L_FIR<10^12 L_sol) detected so far at z>4. In deep HST observations we identified a multiply imaged z~6 source and we measured its spectroscopic redshift z=6.107 with VLT/FORS. This source could be associated with the putative SMG but it is most likely offset spatially by 10-30kpc and they could be interacting galaxies. With a FIR luminosity in the range [5-15]x10^{11} L_sol corresponding to a star formation rate in the range [80-260]M_sol/yr, this SMG would be more representative than the extreme starbursts usually detected at z>4. With a total magnification of ~25 it would open a unique window to the 'normal' dusty galaxies at the end of the epoch of reionization.
  • We present an analysis of cool outflowing gas around galaxies, traced by MgII absorption lines in the co-added spectra of a sample of 486 zCOSMOS galaxies at 1 < z < 1.5. These galaxies span a range of stellar masses (9.45< log[M*/Msun]<10.7) and star formation rates (0.14 < log [SFR/Msun/yr] < 2.35). We identify the cool outflowing component in the MgII absorption and find that the equivalent width of the outflowing component increases with stellar mass. The outflow equivalent width also increases steadily with the increasing star formation rate of the galaxies. At similar stellar masses the blue galaxies exhibit a significantly higher outflow equivalent width as compared to red galaxies. The outflow equivalent width shows strong effect with star formation surface density ({\Sigma}SFR) of the sample. For the disk galaxies, the outflow equivalent width is higher for the face-on systems as compared to the edge-on ones, indicating that for the disk galaxies, the outflowing gas is primarily bipolar in geometry. Galaxies typically exhibit outflow velocities ranging from -200 km/s to -300 km/s and on average the face-on galaxies exhibit higher outflow velocity as compared to the edge-on ones. Galaxies with irregular morphologies exhibit outflow equivalent width as well as outflow velocities comparable to face on disk galaxies. These galaxies exhibit minimum mass outflow rates > 5-7 Msun/yr and a mass loading factor ({\eta} = dMout/dt /SFR) comparable to the star formation rates of the galaxies.
  • We explore the role of environment in the evolution of galaxies over 0.1<z<0.7 using the final zCOSMOS-bright data set. Using the red fraction of galaxies as a proxy for the quenched population, we find that the fraction of red galaxies increases with the environmental overdensity and with the stellar mass, consistent with previous works. As at lower redshift, the red fraction appears to be separable in mass and environment, suggesting the action of two processes: mass and environmental quenching. The parameters describing these appear to be essentially the same at z~0.7 as locally. We explore the relation between red fraction, mass and environment also for the central and satellite galaxies separately, paying close attention to the effects of impurities in the central-satellite classification and using carefully constructed samples matched in stellar mass. There is little evidence for a dependence of the red fraction of centrals on overdensity. Satellites are consistently redder at all overdensities, and the satellite quenching efficiency increases with overdensity at 0.1<z<0.4. This is less marked at higher redshift, but both are nevertheless consistent with the equivalent local measurements. At a given stellar mass, the fraction of galaxies that are satellites also increases with the overdensity. At a given overdensity and mass, the obtained relation between the environmental quenching and the satellite fraction agrees well with the satellite quenching efficiency, demonstrating that the environmental quenching in the overall population is consistent with being entirely produced through the satellite quenching process at least up to z=0.7. However, despite the unprecedented size of our high redshift samples, the associated statistical uncertainties are still significant and our statements should be understood as approximations to physical reality, rather than physically exact formulae.
  • A sample of 94 narrow line AGN with 0.65<z<1.20 has been selected from the 20k-Bright zCOSMOS galaxy sample by detection of the high-ionization [NeV]3426 line. Taking advantage of the large amount of data available in the COSMOS field, the properties of the [NeV]-selected Type-2 AGN have been investigated, focusing on their host galaxies, X-ray emission, and optical line flux ratios. Finally, the diagnostic developed by Gilli et al. (2010), based on the X-ray to [NeV] luminosity ratio, has been exploited to search for the more heavily obscured AGN. We found that [Ne v]-selected narrow line AGN have Seyfert 2-like optical spectra, although with emission line ratios diluted by a star-forming component. The ACS morphologies and stellar component in the optical spectra indicate a preference for our Type-2 AGN to be hosted in early-spirals with stellar masses greater than 10^(9.5-10)Msun, on average higher than those of the galaxy parent sample. The fraction of galaxies hosting [NeV]-selected obscured AGN increases with the stellar mass, reaching a maximum of about 3% at 2x10^11 Msun. A comparison with other selection techniques at z~1 shows that the detection of the [Ne v] line is an effective method to select AGN in the optical band, in particular the most heavily obscured ones, but can not provide by itself a complete census of AGN2. Finally, the high fraction of [NeV]-selected Type-2 AGN not detected in medium-deep Chandra observations (67%) is suggestive of the inclusion of Compton-thick sources in our sample. The presence of a population of heavily obscured AGN is corroborated by the X-ray to [NeV] ratio; we estimated, by mean of X-ray stacking technique and simulations, that the Compton-thick fraction in our sample of Type-2 AGN is 43+-4%, in good agreement with standard assumptions by the XRB synthesis models.
  • We examine the red fraction of central and satellite galaxies in the large zCOSMOS group catalog out to z ~ 0.8 correcting for both the incompleteness in stellar mass and for the less than perfect purities of the central and satellite samples. We show that, at all masses and at all redshifts, the fraction of satellite galaxies that have been quenched, i.e., are red, is systematically higher than that of centrals, as seen locally in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The satellite quenching efficiency, which is the probability that a satellite is quenched because it is a satellite rather than a central, is, as locally, independent of stellar mass. Furthermore, the average value is about 0.5, which is also very similar to that seen in the SDSS. We also construct the mass functions of blue and red centrals and satellites and show that these broadly follow the predictions of the Peng et al. analysis of the SDSS groups. Together, these results indicate that the effect of the group environment in quenching satellite galaxies was very similar when the universe was about a half its present age, as it is today.
  • We investigate the link between AGN activity, star-formation and stellar mass of the host galaxy at 0<z<1, looking for spectroscopic traces of AGN and aging of the host. This work provides an extension of the existing studies at z<0.1 and contributes to shed light on galaxy evolution at intermediate redshifts. We used the zCOSMOS 20k data to create a sample of galaxies at z<1. We divided the sample in several mass-redshift bins to obtain stacked galaxy spectra with an improved S/N. We exploited emission-line diagnostic diagrams to separate AGN from star-forming galaxies. We found indication of a role for the total galaxy stellar mass in leading galaxy classification. Stacked spectra show AGN signatures above the log M_*/M_sun>10.2 threshold. Moreover, the stellar populations of AGN hosts are found to be older with respect to star-forming and composites galaxies. This could be due to the the tendency of AGN to reside in massive hosts. The dependence of the AGN classification on the stellar mass is in agreement with what has been already found in previous studies. It is consistent with, together with the evidence of older stellar populations inhabiting the AGN-like galaxies, the downsizing scenario. In particular, our evidence points to an evolutionary scenario where the AGN-feedback is capable of quenching the star formation in the most massive galaxies. Therefore, the AGN-feedback is the best candidate for initiating the passive evolutionary phase of galaxies.
  • We present new improved constraints on the Hubble parameter H(z) in the redshift range 0.15 < z < 1.1, obtained from the differential spectroscopic evolution of early-type galaxies as a function of redshift. We extract a large sample of early-type galaxies (\sim11000) from several spectroscopic surveys, spanning almost 8 billion years of cosmic lookback time (0.15 < z < 1.42). We select the most massive, red elliptical galaxies, passively evolving and without signature of ongoing star formation. Those galaxies can be used as standard cosmic chronometers, as firstly proposed by Jimenez & Loeb (2002), whose differential age evolution as a function of cosmic time directly probes H(z). We analyze the 4000 {\AA} break (D4000) as a function of redshift, use stellar population synthesis models to theoretically calibrate the dependence of the differential age evolution on the differential D4000, and estimate the Hubble parameter taking into account both statistical and systematical errors. We provide 8 new measurements of H(z) (see Tab. 4), and determine its change in H(z) to a precision of 5-12% mapping homogeneously the redshift range up to z \sim 1.1; for the first time, we place a constraint on H(z) at z \neq 0 with a precision comparable with the one achieved for the Hubble constant (about 5-6% at z \sim 0.2), and covered a redshift range (0.5 < z < 0.8) which is crucial to distinguish many different quintessence cosmologies. These measurements have been tested to best match a \Lambda CDM model, clearly providing a statistically robust indication that the Universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. This method shows the potentiality to open a new avenue in constrain a variety of alternative cosmologies, especially when future surveys (e.g. Euclid) will open the possibility to extend it up to z \sim 2.
  • The chemical evolution of galaxies on a cosmological timescale is still a matter of debate despite the increasing number of available data provided by spectroscopic surveys of star-forming galaxies at different redshifts. The fundamental relations involving metallicity, such as the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) or the fundamental-metallicity relation, give controversial results about the reality of evolution of the chemical content of galaxies at a given stellar mass. In this work we shed some light on this issue using the completeness reached by the 20k bright sample of the zCOSMOS survey and using for the first time the nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio (N/O) as a tracer of the gas phase chemical evolution of galaxies that is independent of the star formation rate. Emission-line galaxies both in the SDSS and 20k zCOSMOS bright survey were used to study the evolution from the local Universe of the $MZR up to a redshift of 1.32 and the relation between stellar mass and nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio (MNOR) up to a redshift of 0.42 using the N2S2 parameter. All the physical properties derived from stellar continuum and gas emission-lines, including stellar mass, star formation rates, metallicity and N/O, were calculated in a self-consistent way over the full redshift range. We confirm the trend to find lower metallicities in galaxies of a given stellar mass in a younger Universe. This trend is even observed when taking possible selection effects into account that are due to the observed larger median star formation rates for galaxies at higher redshifts. We also find a significant evolution of the MNOR up to z = 0.4. Taking the slope of the O/H vs. N/O relation into account for the secondary-nitrogen production regime, the observed evolution of the MNOR is consistent with the trends found for both the MZR and its equivalent relation using new expressions to reduce its dependence on SFR.
  • In this paper we measure the merger fraction and rate, both minor and major, of massive early-type galaxies (M_star >= 10^11 M_Sun) in the COSMOS field, and study their role in mass and size evolution. We use the 30-band photometric catalogue in COSMOS, complemented with the spectroscopy of the zCOSMOS survey, to define close pairs with a separation 10h^-1 kpc <= r_p <= 30h-1 kpc and a relative velocity Delta v <= 500 km s^-1. We measure both major (stellar mass ratio mu = M_star,2/M_star,1 >= 1/4) and minor (1/10 <= mu < 1/4) merger fractions of massive galaxies, and study their dependence on redshift and on morphology. The merger fraction and rate of massive galaxies evolves as a power-law (1+z)^n, with major mergers increasing with redshift, n_MM = 1.4, and minor mergers showing little evolution, n_mm ~ 0. When split by their morphology, the minor merger fraction for early types is higher by a factor of three than that for spirals, and both are nearly constant with redshift. Our results show that massive early-type galaxies have undergone 0.89 mergers (0.43 major and 0.46 minor) since z ~ 1, leading to a mass growth of ~30%. We find that mu >= 1/10 mergers can explain ~55% of the observed size evolution of these galaxies since z ~ 1. Another ~20% is due to the progenitor bias (younger galaxies are more extended) and we estimate that very minor mergers (mu < 1/10) could contribute with an extra ~20%. The remaining ~5% should come from other processes (e.g., adiabatic expansion or observational effects). This picture also reproduces the mass growth and velocity dispersion evolution of these galaxies. We conclude from these results that merging is the main contributor to the size evolution of massive ETGs at z <= 1, accounting for ~50-75% of that evolution in the last 8 Gyr. Nearly half of the evolution due to mergers is related to minor (mu < 1/4) events.