• We present the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS), an 18 square degrees medium-deep survey at 3.6 and 4.5 microns with the post-cryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope to ~2 microJy (AB=23.1) depth of five highly observed astronomical fields (ELAIS-N1, ELAIS-S1, Lockman Hole, Chandra Deep Field South and XMM-LSS). SERVS is designed to enable the study of galaxy evolution as a function of environment from z~5 to the present day, and is the first extragalactic survey both large enough and deep enough to put rare objects such as luminous quasars and galaxy clusters at z>1 into their cosmological context. SERVS is designed to overlap with several key surveys at optical, near- through far-infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths to provide an unprecedented view of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies. In this paper, we discuss the SERVS survey design, the data processing flow from image reduction and mosaicing to catalogs, as well as coverage of ancillary data from other surveys in the SERVS fields. We also highlight a variety of early science results from the survey.
  • We study the star/galaxy classification efficiency of 13 different decision tree algorithms applied to photometric objects in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven (SDSS DR7). Each algorithm is defined by a set of parameters which, when varied, produce different final classification trees. We extensively explore the parameter space of each algorithm, using the set of $884,126$ SDSS objects with spectroscopic data as the training set. The efficiency of star-galaxy separation is measured using the completeness function. We find that the Functional Tree algorithm (FT) yields the best results as measured by the mean completeness in two magnitude intervals: $14\le r\le21$ ($85.2%$) and $r\ge19$ ($82.1%$). We compare the performance of the tree generated with the optimal FT configuration to the classifications provided by the SDSS parametric classifier, 2DPHOT and Ball et al. (2006). We find that our FT classifier is comparable or better in completeness over the full magnitude range $15\le r\le21$, with much lower contamination than all but the Ball et al. classifier. At the faintest magnitudes ($r>19$), our classifier is the only one able to maintain high completeness ($>$80%) while still achieving low contamination ($\sim2.5%$). Finally, we apply our FT classifier to separate stars from galaxies in the full set of $69,545,326$ SDSS photometric objects in the magnitude range $14\le r\le21$.
  • We use SDSS-DR4 photometric and spectroscopic data out to redshift z~0.1 combined with ROSAT All Sky Survey X-ray data to produce a sample of twenty-five fossil groups (FGs), defined as bound systems dominated by a single, luminous elliptical galaxy with extended X-ray emission. We examine possible biases introduced by varying the parameters used to define the sample and the main pitfalls are discussed. The spatial density of FGs, estimated via the V/V_ MAX} test, is 2.83 x 10^{-6} h_{75}^3 Mpc^{-3} for L_x > 0.89 x 10^42 h_{75}^-2 erg/s consistent with Vikhlinin et al. (1999), who examined an X-ray overluminous elliptical galaxy sample (OLEG). We compare the general properties of FGs identified here with a sample of bright field ellipticals generated from the same dataset. These two samples show no differences in the distribution of neighboring faint galaxy density excess, distance from the red sequence in the color-magnitude diagram, and structural parameters such as a$_{4}$ and internal color gradients. Furthermore, examination of stellar populations shows that our twenty-five FGs have similar ages, metallicities, and $\alpha$-enhancement as the bright field ellipticals, undermining the idea that these systems represent fossils of a physical mechanism that occurred at high redshift. Our study reveals no difference between FGs and field ellipticals, suggesting that FGs might not be a distinct family of true fossils, but rather the final stage of mass assembly in the Universe.
  • The Cl1604 supercluster at z=0.9 is one of a small handful of such structures discovered in the high redshift universe, and is the first target observed as part of the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environments (ORELSE) Survey. To date, Cl1604 is the largest structure mapped at z~1, with the most constituent clusters and the largest number of spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies. In this paper we present the results of a spectroscopic campaign to create a three-dimensional map of Cl1604 and to understand the contamination by fore- and background large scale structures. Combining new Deep Imaging Multi-object Spectrograph observations with previous data yields redshifts for 1,383 extragalactic objects in a ~ 0.08 sq. deg region, 449 of which are supercluster members. We examine the complex three dimensional structure of Cl1604, providing velocity dispersions for eight of the member clusters and groups. Our extensive spectroscopic dataset is used to examine potential biases in cluster velocity dispersion measurements in the presence of overlapping structures and filaments. We also discuss other structures found along the line-of-sight, including a filament at z=0.6 and two serendipitously discovered clusters/groups at z~1.2.
  • We describe 2DPHOT, a general purpose analysis environment for source detection and analysis in deep wide-field images. 2DPHOT is an automated tool to obtain both integrated and surface photometry of galaxies in an image, to perform reliable star-galaxy separation with accurate estimates of contamination at faint flux levels, and to estimate completeness of the image catalog. We describe the analysis strategy on which 2DPHOT is based, and provide a detailed description of the different algorithms implemented in the package. This new environment is intended as a dedicated tool to process the wealth of data from wide-field imaging surveys. To this end, the package is complemented by 2DGUI, an environment that allows multiple processing of data using a range of computing architectures.
  • The localization of the short-duration, hard-spectrum GRB 050509b was a watershed event. Thanks to the nearly immediate relay of the GRB position by Swift, we began imaging the GRB field 8 minutes after the burst and continued for the following 8 days. No convincing optical/infrared candidate afterglow or supernova was found for the object. We present a re-analysis of the XRT afterglow and find an absolute position that is ~4" to the west of the XRT position reported previously. Close to this position is a bright elliptical galaxy with redshift z=0.2248, about 1' from the center of a rich cluster of galaxies. Based on positional coincidences, the GRB and the bright elliptical are likely to be physically related. We thus have discovered evidence that at least some short-duration, hard-spectra GRBs arise at cosmological distances. However, while GRB 050509b was underluminous compared to long-duration GRBs, we demonstrate that the ratio of the blast-wave energy to the gamma-ray energy is consistent with that of long-duration GRBs. Based on this analysis, on the location of the GRB (40 +- 13 kpc from a bright galaxy), on the galaxy type (elliptical), and the lack of a coincident supernova, we suggest that there is now observational consistency with the hypothesis that short-hard bursts arise during the merger of a compact binary. We limit the properties of a Li-Paczynski ''mini-supernova.'' Other progenitor models are still viable, and additional rapidly localized bursts from the Swift mission will undoubtedly help to further clarify the progenitor picture. (abridged)
  • In this paper we present an objectively defined catalog of 459 small, high density groups of galaxies out to z~0.2 in a region of 6260 square degrees in the northern sky derived from the Digitized Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Our catalog extends down to r = 19.0 and has a median redshift of z_med = 0.12, making it complementary to Hickson's catalog for the nearby universe (z_med = 0.03). The depth and angular coverage of this catalog makes it valuable for studies of the general characteristics of small groups of galaxies and how galaxies evolve in and around them. We also examine the relationship between compact groups and large scale structure.
  • The Cl 1604 supercluster at z~0.9 is known to contain at least four distinct member clusters, separated in both projection and redshift. In this paper we present deep, multicolor wide-field imaging of a region spanning ~45' on a side, corresponding to 21 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc (physical) at the supercluster redshift. We select galaxies whose colors correspond to those of spectroscopically confirmed cluster members in the r' vs. (r'-i') color-magnitude diagram. Using an adaptive kernel, we generate a map of the projected red galaxy density and identify numerous new candidate clusters which are likely supercluster members. Assuming that all of the density peaks are associated with the supercluster, its transverse size is ~10 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc, which is still significantly smaller than the nearly 93 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc depth in redshift space.
  • We present spectroscopic confirmation of the Cl 1604 supercluster at z~0.9. Originally detected as two individual clusters, Cl 1604+4304 at z = 0.90 and Cl 1604+4321 at z = 0.92, which are closely separated in both redshift and sky position, subsequent imaging revealed a complex of red galaxies bridging the two clusters, suggesting that the region contained a large scale structure. We have carried out extensive multi-object spectroscopy, which, combined with previous measurements, provides ~600 redshifts in this area, including 230 confirmed supercluster members. We detect two additional clusters that are part of this structure, Cl 1604+4314 at z = 0.87 and Cl 1604+4316 at z = 0.94. All four have properties typical of local clusters, with line-of-sight velocity dispersions between 489 and 962 km/s. The structure is significantly extended in redshift space, which, if interpreted as a true elongation in real space, implies a depth of 93 Mpc. We examine the spatial and redshift distribution of the supercluster members.
  • We present a new, objectively defined catalog of candidate galaxy clusters based on the galaxy catalogs from the Digitized Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (DPOSS). This cluster catalog, derived from the best calibrated plates in the high latitude (|b|>30) Northern Galactic Cap region, covers 5,800 square degrees, and contains 8,155 candidate clusters. A simple adaptive kernel density mapping technique, combined with the SExtractor object detection algorithm, is used to detect galaxy overdensities, which we identify as clusters. Simulations of the background galaxy distribution and clusters of varying richnesses and redshifts allow us to optimize detection parameters, and measure the completeness and contamination rates for our catalog. Cluster richnesses and photometric redshifts are measured, using integrated colors and magnitudes for each cluster. An extensive spectroscopic survey is used to confirm the photometric results. This catalog, with well-characterized sample properties, provides a sound basis for future studies of cluster physics and large scale structure.
  • This paper presents photometric redshifts for 431 Abell clusters imaged as part of the Palomar Abell Cluster Optical Survey (PACOS), of which 236 are new redshi fts. We have obtained moderately deep, 3--band (Gunn gri) imaging for this sam ple at the Palomar Observatory 60'' telescope, as part of the photometric calibration of DPOSS. Our data acquisition, reduction, and photometric calibration techniques are described, and photometric accuracy and consistency is demonstrated. An empirical redshift estimator is presented, utilizing background-corrected median g-r colors and mean g magnitudes for the ensemble of galaxies in each field. We present photometric redshift estimates for the clusters in our sample with an accuracy of sigma_z=0.038. These redshift estimates provide checks on single-galaxy cluster redshifts, as well as distance information for studies of the Butcher-Oemler effect, luminosity functions, M/L ratios, and many other projects.
  • The Northern Sky Optical Cluster Survey is a project to create an objective catalog of galaxy clusters over the entire high-galactic-latitude Northern sky, with well understood selection criteria. We use the object catalogs generated from the Digitized Second Palomar Sky Survey (DPOSS, Djorgovski et al. 1999) as the basis for this survey. We apply a color criterion to select against field galaxies, and use a simple adaptive kernel technique to create galaxy density maps, combined with the bootstrap technique to make significance maps, from which density peaks are selected. This survey attempts to eliminate some of the subjective criteria and assumptions of past surveys, including detection by eye (Abell 1958, ACO 1989) and assumed luminosity functions and cluster profiles (PDCS, Postman et al. 1995). We also utilize more information (especially colors) than the most similar recent survey, the APM (Dalton et al. 1992). This paper presents the details of our cluster detection technique, as well as some initial results for two small areas totaling ~60 square degrees. We find a mean surface density of ~1.5 clusters per square degree, consistent with the detection of richness class 0 and higher clusters to z~0.3. In addition, we demonstrate an effective photometric redshift estimator for our clusters.
  • We report the discovery of a radio transient VLA 232937.2-235553, coincident with the proposed X-ray afterglow for the gamma-ray burst GRB 981226. This GRB has the highest ratio of X-ray to gamma-ray fluence of all the GRBs detected by BeppoSAX so far and yet no corresponding optical transient was detected. The radio light curve of VLA 232937.2-235553 is qualitatively similar to that of several other radio afterglows. At the sub-arcsecond position provided by the radio detection, optical imaging reveals an extended R=24.9 mag object, which we identify as the host galaxy of GRB 981226. Afterglow models which invoke a jet-like geometry for the outflow or require an ambient medium with a radial density dependence, such as that produced by a wind from a massive star, are both consistent with the radio data. Furthermore, we show that the observed properties of the radio afterglow can explain the absence of an optical transient without the need for large extinction local to the GRB.
  • We report on the creation of an unbiased catalog of galaxy clusters from the galaxy catalogs derived from the digitized POSS-II (DPOSS). Utilizing the g-r color information, we show that it is possible to estimate redshifts for galaxy clusters at z<0.4 with an rms accuracy of 0.01.
  • Afterglow, or long-lived emission, has now been detected from about a dozen well-positioned gamma-ray bursts. Distance determinations made by measuring optical emission lines from the host galaxy, or absorption lines in the afterglow spectrum, place the burst sources at significant cosmological distances, with redshifts ranging from ~1--3. The energy required to produce the bright gamma-ray flashes is enormous: up to ~10^{53} erg or 10 percent of the rest mass energy of a neutron star, if the emission is isotropic. Here we present the discovery of the optical afterglow and the redshift of GRB 990123, the brightest well-localized GRB to date. With our measured redshift of >1.6, the inferred isotropic energy release exceeds the rest mass of a neutron star thereby challenging current theoretical models for the origin of GRBs. We argue that the optical and IR afterglow measurements reported here may provide the first observational evidence of beaming in a GRB, thereby reducing the required energetics to a level where stellar death models are still tenable.
  • We present deep images of the field of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 990123 obtained in a broad-band UV/visible bandpass with the Hubble Space Telescope, and deep near-infrared images obtained with the Keck-I 10-m telescope. Both the HST and Keck images show that the optical transient (OT) is clearly offset by 0.6 arcsec from an extended object, presumably the host galaxy. This galaxy is the most likely source of the metallic-line absorption at z = 1.6004 seen in the spectrum of the OT. With magnitudes V_{C} ~ 24.6 +/- 0.2 and K = 21.65 +/- 0.30 mag this corresponds to an L ~ 0.7 L_* galaxy, assuming that it is located at z = 1.6. The estimated unobscured star formation rate is SFR ~ 6 M_sun/yr, which is not unusually high for normal galaxies at comparable redshifts. The strength of the observed metallic absorption lines is suggestive of a relatively high metallicity of the gas, and thus of a chemically evolved system which may be associated with a massive galaxy. It is also indicative of a high column density of the gas, typical of damped Ly-alpha systems at high redshifts. We conclude that this is the host galaxy of GRB 990123. No other obvious galaxies are detected within the same projected radius from the OT. There is thus no evidence for strong gravitational lensing magnification of this burst, and some alternative explanation for its remarkable energetics may be required. The observed offset of the OT from the center of its apparent host galaxy, 5.5 +/- 0.9 proper kpc (projected) in the galaxy's rest-frame, both refutes the possibility that GRBs are related to galactic nuclear activity and supports models of GRBs which involve the death and/or merger of massive stars. Further, the HST image suggests an intimate connection of GRB 990123 and a star-forming region.